U.S. under-23s: no time for the mourning after, but time for some to release the hand brake

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There is absolutely no time for rebukes and rehash in the under-23 men’s national camp. They are on the field again in 36 hours, and if they can’t get their Olympic-bound cart out of the ditch, we’ll have all summer for autopsy.

Manager Caleb Porter sure gets it. “We’re all disappointed,” he said after last night’s 2-0 loss to Canada. “The reality is we need to move on. We need to get back to work tomorrow. We can’t dwell on this.”

All of his post-game comments are here.

Meanwhile, we’ll look quickly at three important individuals who simply must find the next level. U.S. international sides have a history of being at their best when things get bumpy; historically, they are better as underdogs, greater when pushing through hard times, lesser when leading the pack.

So, here are three who need to lead the “step-up” charge:

Freddy Adu

Adu loves the playmaker role. He’s OK out on the wing; I truly believe this is a far more mature Freddy Adu these days, one who has been through the professional wringer and knows what’s up in the world. He doesn’t complain about manning the flanks, but his true love is at central playmaker. He said so when I spoke to him during the Dallas training camp in February.

Fair enough. So step up. Be the creator in there – if that’s where Caleb Porter wants to put you.

Listen to what Porter said about the halftime adjustment, the centerpiece of which was moving Adu inside from the right wing. “We didn’t use the width we talked about at halftime,” Porter said. “We put Joe Gyau on and talked about creating 2 versus 1 situations wide. We didn’t do that well enough.”

That’s not all on Adu, of course. But much of it is. The thing with being a playmaker and orchestrator – you have to orchestrate. And it’s not always easy, especially when teams stack the midfield in a Christmas tree (4-3-2-1) formation as Canada did. It is what it is, and Adu has to find a way.

Bill Hamid

Monday’s match will go far in defining the young D.C. United goalkeeper’s career. Right now, he’s a talented work in progress, one who made a huge and costly mistake. That’s over. So now what is he going to do about it?

I say all the time, the problem with young goalkeepers isn’t the “mistake,” per se. It’s how they handle it. Can Hamid jog out onto the field for warm-ups Monday knowing, in his heart of hearts, that he can still manage the job? Does he know, beyond all doubt, that he’s the backstopper Porter needs to get the car back on the road? For there is no other way to play. He cannot hesitate, blink or think about things for a nano-second back there. Big-time goalkeepers are ‘keepers of supreme confidence – the rest just fall in line as good league-level men between the sticks.

(All that is assuming Porter sticks with Hamid; it was always close between he and Sean Johnson.)

Teal Bunbury or Terrence Boyd

Everybody is bummed about Juan Agudelo, and who can blame them? But as they say, he’s not coming off that bench now. So one of the remaining American strikers simply must do more. Bunbury got the start but was only dangerous last night when pressuring and harassing. Boyd got the last half hour and needed to plant the big idea in Porter’s noggin: “I have to start this guy next time.” But Boyd didn’t.

The best U.S. moments Saturday came when Brek Shea was unshackled on the wings, putting something worthwhile into the mixer. That’s just half the recipe. He needs someone finding the vulnerable spots in front of goal, and doing the deed from there.

Note

I didn’t pick center back Ike Opara as one of the “step-uppers” because, in all honesty, I suspect he’s all he can be at the moment. He hasn’t been very good over two matches, confirming what many suspected anyway, that he was slightly in over his head. It’s up to Porter now: stick with Opara and provide the necessary cover when possible or change personnel. That’s about it.

Chastain, MacMillan inducted into US Soccer Hall of Fame

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SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) Brandi Chastain looked at the assembled crowd in a tent under the rain and addressed former coach Tony DiCicco, who had just introduced her at the induction ceremony for the U.S. National Soccer Hall of Fame.

[ MORE: USMNT smashes six past Honduras in CONCACAF WCQ ]

“Thank you, not just for today but for every day that you gave me the chance to play for the women’s national team, and for having the confidence in me and the guts to tell me I wasn’t going to be a forward,” she said.

Chastain, a forward on the 1991 World Cup champions and a left back whose penalty kick won a shootout for the 1999 title, was inducted Friday night along with midfielder Shannon MacMillan, a 1996 Olympic gold medalist and World Cup champion three years later.

[ MORE: Player ratings from USMNT’s win over Honduras ]

The ceremony was held before the U.S. men played Honduras in a World Cup qualifier.

Remembered most for pulling off her shirt after her World Cup-winning goal and celebrating in a sports bra, Chastain grew up in San Jose and talked about her early days playing youth soccer in the area, starting with the Quakettes. After winning her first World Cup title, she was left off the 1995 roster. She revived her career as a defender.

“Change is good. Though, scary, it’s good. And I think we would all benefit from seeing change as an opportunity for growth and development, and for a new adventure,” she said.

Now 38, Chastain scored 30 goals in 192 international appearances and also won a pair of Olympic gold medals. MacMillan, 42, had 60 in 176 international games.

“It was always such a massive honor that gave me chills every time I walked in that locker room, whether it was my first cap, my 100th cap or my last cap,” MacMillan said. “It was something that I never took for granted.”

Soccer America’s Paul Kennedy was given the Colin Jose Media Award.

The Hall’s building in Oneonta, New York, closed in 2010 and a new Hall is being built in Frisco, Texas.

Hernandez, Araujo score in 1st half, Mexico beats Costa Rica

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MEXICO CITY (AP) Javier Hernandez and Nestor Araujo scored in the first half, and Mexico overcame the absence of half a dozen players to beat Costa Rica 2-0 on Friday night in a World Cup qualifying match.

Hernandez scored on a cross from Carlos Vela to open the score in the seventh and Araujo added a goal on a header in the 45th.

[ USMNT: Recap & videoPlayer ratings ]

Hernandez scored his 46th goal with the Mexican team and tied Jared Borgetti as the all-time leading scorer.

With the win, Mexico remains undefeated and has seven points after three rounds to take sole command in the six-nation tournament. Costa Rica stays on six points and is second and Panama is third with four.

The top three teams qualified for the Russia 2018 World Cup.

Mexico beat Costa Rica for the first time since September 11, 2012, when they prevailed 1-0.

Running Away With It

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Christian Pulisic scored and played a part in three other goals as the United States rained goals down on Honduras in a 6-0 win at Avaya Stadium in San Jose early Saturday morning.

Clint Dempsey scored two goals, and Michael Bradley and Sebastian Lletget also scored as the U.S. moved into fourth place in CONCACAF World Cup qualifying. Their next match is Tuesday in Panama.

[ MORE: Player ratings | Three things ]

The United States men’s national team’s bid to recover their 2018 World Cup hopes got off to a flying start.

Sloppy Honduran defending caused a turnover outside the 18, and Jozy Altidore played Christian Pulisic in on goal. Keeper Donis Escober got a piece of Pulisic’s shot, but no one followed Lletget to the back post and the ex-West Ham and current LA Galaxy man quickly put the Yanks up 1-0.

The Yanks didn’t stop, and Lletget drew a yellow card when he beat Ever Alvarado down the right flank and forced a take down from the Honduran defender.

Alberth Elis slipped John Brooks’ mark, and the Houston Dynamo man turned to fire on goal. Tim Howard was well positioned to scoop it up.

Lletget turned out to be injured by the Alvarado foul, and Bruce Arena turned to Alejandro Bedoya in the 17th minute.

Geoff Cameron was given a yellow card in the 25th minute for a foul on Roger Espinoza. That gave a free kick to Honduras from 30 yards out, and Romell Quioto fired right at Tim Howard.

Then it was the captain who doubled the lead, as Honduras inexplicably gave him the room to walk across the arc of the 18 to rip a shot across goal. 2-0.

It was Clint Dempsey’s turn in the 33rd minute, after an otherworldly scooped pass from Pulisic.

What. A. Pass. Kid.

Honduras then took a bigger hit: the loss of star attacker Romell Quioto (Houston Dynamo) to an apparent shoulder injury.

Brooks bailed out an out-of-position Gonzalez just before halftime to keep the lead 3-0.

The Yanks needed 15 seconds to make it 4-0, with Dempsey winning a 50-50 tussle and finding Altidore for a flick to Pulisic. He netted his fourth USMNT goal. He’s 18.

Pulisic then won a free kick 25 yards out from goal by embellishing a foul, and Dempsey’s free kick tricked Escober. 6-0. For real.

A scary moment late as a dazed and wobbly John Brooks was forced off despite no apparent injury. Fox’s Jenny Taft said he was dehydrated, which is a relief.

LINEUP

USMNT: Howard; Villafana, Gonzalez, Brooks (Ream, 70′), Cameron (Zusi, 58′); Bradley, Lletget (Bedoya, 18′), Nagbe; Pulisic, Dempsey, Altidore.

Goals: Lletget (5′), Bradley (27′), Dempsey (33′, 49′, 54′), Pulisic (46′)

Player ratings from USMNT’s pounding of Honduras

Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images
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Battered. Throttled. Eviscerated.

Pick your verb of dominance, the United States likely fit it well in a 6-0 destruction of Honduras at Avaya Stadium in San Jose.

[ MORE: Recap + video | Three things ]

The win boosts the U.S. in World Cup qualifying after their 0-2 start, but how did the individuals fare? Obviously well.

Starting XI

Tim Howard — 7 — The team just feels in a safer place with the veteran back there. If the U.S. goes to the 2018 World Cup, Howard remains their No. 1 (and there probably never should have been a question. Sorry Brad).

Jorge Villafana — 7 — Tidy passing and a low-risk game from the Santos Laguna man.

John Brooks (Off 70′) — 7 — An early error before recovering to be his usual free-clearing, athletic self. Scary injury took him out late, as he looked dazed. Fox’s Jenny Taft said he was dehydrated, which is a relief.

Omar Gonzalez — 5  — He wasn’t bad, but Gonzalez is still a positional question mark. Bailed out a couple times by Brooks.

Geoff Cameron (Off 59′) — 6 — Out of position and a bit hobbled, he wasn’t at his best.

Michael Bradley — 7 — One of his better USMNT games in a long time.

Sebastian Lletget (Off 17′) — 8 — Scored, then got hurt on a roasting run down the right.

Darlington Nagbe — 6 — One or two electric moments in the first half, but overall a quiet enough night for the Timbers man.

Christian Pulisic — 9 — Hard to not to hand the kid a 10. He’s quite frankly the most exciting American talent in the history of the program.

Clint Dempsey — 10 — Along with Howard, the sort of player you knew would make sure this game ended with three points. The fact that he nabbed three goals, too, is just a bonus.

Jozy Altidore — 7  — Pretty darn good night holding up the ball, and passed as well as ever, but did he drop a bit too deep too often? The answer is probably, “Who cares? They won 6-0, dude.”

Subs

Alejandro Bedoya (On 18′)  — 6 — Typical high energy, space eating job in the middle of the park from the Union man.

Graham Zusi (On 58′)  — 6 — Good late clearance preserved the shutout.

Tim Ream (On 70′)  — 6 — Interesting to note that Arena went to him over Walker Zimmerman or Matt Besler.