McBride

Today’s 10-year anniversary: the most important day in U.S. Soccer history

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Journalists get themselves in trouble when they overstep on pronouncements of historical importance. Truly, it’s easy to get swept up in the cross currents of hyperbole and get pulled out to sea.

But I’ll chance it here and say this: We stand today on the 10-year anniversary of the most important day in U.S. Soccer history.

The United States national team manufactured one of its biggest moments on this date, 10 years ago. Don’t underestimate what a stunning 3-2 win over Portugal that day meant going forward.

It came in Suwon, Korea, where John O’Brien, Landon Donovan and Brian McBride scored in the first half against Portugal to open World Cup 2002. (That was surely the most shocking 45 minutes of U.S. Soccer history; that much we can all agree on, no?)

That match launched the U.S. soccer team’s breakthrough quarterfinal march. (A march that ended perhaps unfairly, blunted at least partially by one notoriously incorrect decision). That was the match that started the U.S. movement beyond also-ran status in world soccer.

Don’t forget, the United States was coming off a brutal performance at World Cup 1998, adjudged 32nd best out of 32 teams. They had escaped as hosts from the first round of World Cup 1994 and had been spanked like the young bucks they were at Italia ’90. So, honestly, who saw this coming, this rise against the established global soccer order?

Twelve days later, another grand moment would be achieved: the 2-0 win over Mexico in World Cup elimination play. More important in the big picture, because it moved the United States into the quarterfinals and helped create critical mass in the burgeoning psychological edge over regional rival Mexico? Perhaps. It was probably a better team performance in athletic terms.

But as historic moment: that match never happens if not for the shocking Portuguese ambush in Suwon. Because, if we’re honest, the remainder of the U.S. first round consisted of an underwhelming (although pulsating) draw with Korea and a full crash landing against Poland, a 3-1 loss with booboos aplenty.

So, the stunner over Portugal gets my vote.

Other “biggest moment” candidates: the day in 1988 (July 5) when FIFA awarded World Cup 1994 to the United States. Or perhaps a November day in 1989 when Paul Caligiuri carried the United States into World Cup 1990.

source:  But I’ll propose that June 5, 2002, was the most important date in U.S. Soccer – over the last 20 years, at very least.

The day was resplendent with Grade A performances from U.S. men, as Arena’s young group, confident beyond its years, dealt a devastating blow to Portugal’s ballyhooed and certainly overly confident Golden Generation.

O’Brien scored that shocking first goal after just four minutes. (He was also force in midfield ball handling that day.) Young DaMarcus Beasley, having never blinked when Arena informed him of an impending start, was a dervish, harassing Portuguese attackers and bothering the opposition with his fast feet going forward. Donovan announced himself to the world by engaging a Portuguese team that suddenly looked sluggish and slow – and perhaps irritated for being made to defend.

Tony Sanneh’s one-on-one defending at right back was flawless for most of the match, and one of his bursts forward provided the cross to McBride that situated his team with a 3-0 lead. In the 36th minute!

And about McBride: what a match that man had, undressing Portugal’s decorated center backs with a brilliant combination of skill, wits and American want-to.  Portuguese goalkeeper Vitor Baia couldn’t hold McBride’s blistering 4th-minute header off a corner kick, for instance. O’Brien was there to clean up. Later, McBride cleverly feinted toward the near post before breaking to the back, knowing exactly where Sanneh was about to drop that critical cross. And that was the 3-0 lead.

How ironic that such a momentous occasion was seen by such a precious few; that match started in pre-dawn hours. So, many sleepy U.S. fans awoke to the stunning news. Either way, the world was awake to a new player in the global game.

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Atleti’s Torres ready for “game of his life” in UEFA Champions League final

MADRID, SPAIN - MAY 21: Atletico de Madrid players Saul Niguez (L) and Fernando Torres (R) stretch during the training session during the Club Atletico de Madrid Open Media Day ahead of the UEFA Champions League Final match against Real Madrid CF on May 21, 2016 in Majadahonda, Spain.
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Fernando Torres has won the UEFA Champions League before, but a victory on Saturday would ring as true as ever.

Calling it the game of his life, the Atletico Madrid striker spoke about this year’s final against Real Madrid.

[ MORE: Three battles that could determined UCL final ]

A lot has changed since the 2012 victory over Bayern Munich at the Allianz Arena, when Torres subbed into Chelsea’s comeback win.

His decline at Chelsea found him on loan to Milan, where he transferred before finding another loan back home to Atleti. Now 32, Torres has his most goals since 2013 and is preparing for a Madrid Derby final.

From Sky Sports:

“Tomorrow [Saturday] is the game of my life, without doubt,” said Torres. “To me it means everything. Everything you dream when you’re a kid, I have the chance tomorrow to make this dream come true.

“I’ve played for great teams, and won many things, but this one is special, it is different, it’s what I wanted when I was a kid.”

Later lauding Atleti for giving him the chance “to come back and fight for what I wanted”, Torres is clearly hungry for a bit of redemption. And if his side comes out on top, he’ll likely be a big part of it.

Costa injury sends Kaka into Brazil’s Copa America squad

ORLANDO, FL - MARCH 06:  Kaka (R) is seen on the field prior to a MLS soccer match between Real Salt Lake and the Orlando City SC at the Orlando Citrus Bowl on March 6, 2016 in Orlando, Florida. Kaka will not start the season opener due to injury. (Photo by Alex Menendez/Getty Images)
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Orlando City is losing its wizard for a bit.

Kaka, 34, has been called into Dunga’s Brazil squad for this summer’s Copa America Centenario.

The move was made after Bayern Munich star Douglas Costa picked up an injury that will cause him to miss the tournament.

[ COPA AMERICA PREVIEWS: Group A | B | C | D ]

The 2007 Ballon D’Or winner didn’t play in that year’s Copa America, which Brazil won.

Kaka has two goals and five assists in 7 MLS matches this season, a year after netting nine times with six assists in 28 matches.

Evans to face new rape trial in October

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND - MARCH 28:  Sheffield United player Ched Evans in action during the npower League One game between Sheffield United and Chesterfield at Bramall Lane on March 28, 2012 in Sheffield, England.  (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images)
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CARDIFF, Wales (AP) A former Premier League player whose rape conviction was overturned will face a new trial in October.

Ched Evans, a Wales international who has played for Manchester City and Sheffield United, appeared in court in Cardiff on Friday and pleaded not guilty to raping a woman at a hotel in May 2011.

[ MORE: Mourinho confirmed | Speaks more ]

Evans had already served half of a five-year sentence before being released from prison and getting the conviction overturned in April following an appeal.

Evans only spoke briefly to confirm his identity before entering his plea.

The new trial will start on Oct. 4 in Cardiff.

Mourinho: “I prefer to forget the last three years” of Manchester United

MANCHESTER, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 26:  Chelsea Manager Jose Mourinho is asked for his autograph by fans prior to the Barclays Premier League match between Manchester United and Chelsea at Old Trafford on October 26, 2014 in Manchester, England.  (Photo by Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images)
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Manchester United manager Jose Mourinho has immediately begun courting the fans of his new club.

The 53-year-old Portuguese manager may’ve run rivals Chelsea on two occasions, but claims he’s always had empathy with United even when defeating the Old Trafford club.

[ MORE: United hires Mourinho | Things he must do ]

In an interview with Manchester United TV, Mourinho issues some high praise of the club while also managing a bit of classic “The Special One” ego in saying, “Giant clubs must be for the best managers.”

As for the disappointing trio of years between David Moyes and Louis Van Gaal, Mourinho says he’d rather consider his tenure in line with the run of Alex Ferguson.

From the BBC:

“I think we can look at our club in two perspectives – one is the past three years and another is the history. I prefer to forget the last three years. I prefer to focus on the giant club I have in my hands now. “

Mourinho has had some time to calculate the best way to endear himself to United supporters, and playing to their belief as the most historic club in the world sure pushes the right buttons.

Now comes the task of delivering titles in a climate more competitive than any other time in modern history.