Today’s 10-year anniversary: the most important day in U.S. Soccer history


Journalists get themselves in trouble when they overstep on pronouncements of historical importance. Truly, it’s easy to get swept up in the cross currents of hyperbole and get pulled out to sea.

But I’ll chance it here and say this: We stand today on the 10-year anniversary of the most important day in U.S. Soccer history.

The United States national team manufactured one of its biggest moments on this date, 10 years ago. Don’t underestimate what a stunning 3-2 win over Portugal that day meant going forward.

It came in Suwon, Korea, where John O’Brien, Landon Donovan and Brian McBride scored in the first half against Portugal to open World Cup 2002. (That was surely the most shocking 45 minutes of U.S. Soccer history; that much we can all agree on, no?)

That match launched the U.S. soccer team’s breakthrough quarterfinal march. (A march that ended perhaps unfairly, blunted at least partially by one notoriously incorrect decision). That was the match that started the U.S. movement beyond also-ran status in world soccer.

Don’t forget, the United States was coming off a brutal performance at World Cup 1998, adjudged 32nd best out of 32 teams. They had escaped as hosts from the first round of World Cup 1994 and had been spanked like the young bucks they were at Italia ’90. So, honestly, who saw this coming, this rise against the established global soccer order?

Twelve days later, another grand moment would be achieved: the 2-0 win over Mexico in World Cup elimination play. More important in the big picture, because it moved the United States into the quarterfinals and helped create critical mass in the burgeoning psychological edge over regional rival Mexico? Perhaps. It was probably a better team performance in athletic terms.

But as historic moment: that match never happens if not for the shocking Portuguese ambush in Suwon. Because, if we’re honest, the remainder of the U.S. first round consisted of an underwhelming (although pulsating) draw with Korea and a full crash landing against Poland, a 3-1 loss with booboos aplenty.

So, the stunner over Portugal gets my vote.

Other “biggest moment” candidates: the day in 1988 (July 5) when FIFA awarded World Cup 1994 to the United States. Or perhaps a November day in 1989 when Paul Caligiuri carried the United States into World Cup 1990.

source:  But I’ll propose that June 5, 2002, was the most important date in U.S. Soccer – over the last 20 years, at very least.

The day was resplendent with Grade A performances from U.S. men, as Arena’s young group, confident beyond its years, dealt a devastating blow to Portugal’s ballyhooed and certainly overly confident Golden Generation.

O’Brien scored that shocking first goal after just four minutes. (He was also force in midfield ball handling that day.) Young DaMarcus Beasley, having never blinked when Arena informed him of an impending start, was a dervish, harassing Portuguese attackers and bothering the opposition with his fast feet going forward. Donovan announced himself to the world by engaging a Portuguese team that suddenly looked sluggish and slow – and perhaps irritated for being made to defend.

Tony Sanneh’s one-on-one defending at right back was flawless for most of the match, and one of his bursts forward provided the cross to McBride that situated his team with a 3-0 lead. In the 36th minute!

And about McBride: what a match that man had, undressing Portugal’s decorated center backs with a brilliant combination of skill, wits and American want-to.  Portuguese goalkeeper Vitor Baia couldn’t hold McBride’s blistering 4th-minute header off a corner kick, for instance. O’Brien was there to clean up. Later, McBride cleverly feinted toward the near post before breaking to the back, knowing exactly where Sanneh was about to drop that critical cross. And that was the 3-0 lead.

How ironic that such a momentous occasion was seen by such a precious few; that match started in pre-dawn hours. So, many sleepy U.S. fans awoke to the stunning news. Either way, the world was awake to a new player in the global game.


Jurgen Klopp coy over links with Liverpool

LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 25:  Jurgen Klopp manager of Borussia Dortmund speaks during a Borussia Dortmund press conference, ahead of the UEFA Champions League Group D match against Arsenal, at Emirates Stadium on November 25, 2014 in London, England.  (Photo by Ian Walton/Getty Images)
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Based on all the reports, it seems like a matter of when, not if, Jurgen Klopp will be named the next manager at Liverpool.

The former Borussia Dortmund boss had been heavily linked with the Liverpool job even before Brendan Rodgers was fired, and now that Rodgers is out, Klopp’s name is once again grabbing all the headlines.

While some reports state he could be appointed manager by the end of the week, nothing is official yet as Klopp is still in Germany, unemployed as of today.

[ REPORTS: Nigel Pearson approached by Sunderland ]

Klopp was approached by a reporter from German news outlet Bild in Leverkusen, and was asked about the vacant Liverpool job. While he did not confirm he was in talks with the club, he didn’t deny the links either.

There’s nothing to say. Neither a definite yes nor a definite no. I’m going home now.

It is believed that a deal between the club and the manager is in the works, with a few details still needed to be worked out before anything is made official.

[ MORE: JPW’s Premier League Playback: Rodgers gone, but not forgotten ]

One of the biggest roadblocks in the deal is Liverpool’s use of a transfer committee when buying new players, while Klopp is supposedly keen on having full control over the team’s signings. The club has said no moves are made without the manager’s approval, although it is reported that Rodgers was limited on what players he could bring in, having multiple moves shot down by the committee.

Former Real Madrid boss Carlo Ancelotti is still in the running for the vacant position, but at this time, Klopp is the out-and-out favorite to take over.

Reports: Sunderland reaches out to Nigel Pearson

WEST BROMWICH, ENGLAND - APRIL 11:  Nigel Pearson, manager of Leicester City during the Barclays Premier League match between West Bromwich Albion and Leicester City at The Hawthorns on April 11, 2015 in West Bromwich, England.  (Photo by Michael Regan/Getty Images)
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Sunderland is without a win and without a manager, as the Black Cats are in desperate need of some help.

After manager Dick Advocaat resigned following Sunderland’s 2-2 draw against West Ham, the club has been searching for a replacement to help lead the club off the bottom of the table.

Reports out of England state the North East club has approached former Leicester City boss Nigel Pearson, who has been out of work after being fired over the summer.

[ MORE: Latest Premier League standings ]

Pearson knows what it takes to win with a team in a relegation battle, as he led Leicester to a 14th place finish last season after sitting bottom of the table at Christmas. Still in last place in March, the Foxes won seven of their final nine matches to stay up in the Premier League.

However, Pearson was sacked over the summer after having a fall-out with the Leicester board, and it was well-documented that he had a tumultuous relationship with the club’s owners.

It is being reported that Sunderland’s technical director Lee Congerton approached Pearson about the job, but that club owner Ellis Short would rather bring former West Ham manager Sam Allardyce on board.

[ REPORTS: Liverpool could appoint Jurgen Klopp manager by end of the week ]

When you look at Nigel Pearson, he is a polar opposite of Dick Advocaat. Advocaat came to Sunderland towards the end of his managerial career, with experience winning titles with major clubs throughout Europe. However, he had never managed in the Premier League, and had no experience with a club fighting for survival.

Pearson, on the other hand, is fresh off a relegation battle and his fiery attitude may be what’s needed to turn Sunderland around. While Pearson may not always see eye-to-eye with the media or the board, he is fiercely loyal to his players and is a no-nonsense type-manager.

With the Premier League on an international break, Sunderland has a bit of time to figure things out, but expect Pearson’s name to continue to be linked with the job.