Offshore drilling, Euro 2012: Spain 2, France 0

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Man of the Match: An early Spain goal meant there weren’t many stand out performances, the game contested between an Spain team lacking ambition and a France side deprived of the ball. Xabi Alonso, however, had a day to remember, scoring twice in his centennial appearance for La Roja. A fine first half header provided the early winner, with a late penalty kick completing the midfielder’s double.

NBC Sports: Spain beats France 2-0 to reach semifinals

Packaged for takeaway:

  • Pre-match changes sent heads spinning as to what the coaches had in mind, and given how the match slowed down after Spain’s opener, the game’s most interesting aspect was the mundane tactical battle set up by Laurent Blanc’s selection:
    • For Spain, it wasn’t much of a mystery. Fernando Torres was out. Cesc Fabregas was in, with Vicente Del Bosque coming good on his mid-week misgivings about his starting XI. This meant Spain planned to play with … (wait for it) … a false nine! ZOMGs!
    • For France, the changes were more meaningful. Philippe Mexes was suspended, so Arsenal’s Laurent Koscielny came in. Anthony Revelliere was also brought into the defense, with normal starting right back Mathieu Debuchy pushed into midfield. Florent Malouda came in to bolster to the middle, while Samir Nasri and Hatem Ben Arfa went to the bench.
    • That Nasri and Ben Arfa were dropped wasn’t much of a surprise. Nasri had come under fire for being too slow in his passing and not diligent enough with his defending. Ben Arfa was talking on his cell phone in the locker room after the Sweden game, electing not to take part of the team’s post-match discussions.
    • France’s formation was 4-5-1, with its initial distribution mimicking a kind of 4-3-2-1 except for Debuchy playing as a type of right-sided sweeper. Blanc obviously didn’t want Andres Iniesta deciding the match. Debuchy tracked the Spain star until he could be handed off to Revelliere, and vice-versa. When Revelliere was pulled wide, Debuchy would drop into the space.
    • Adding to some of the confusion on the defense’s right, Adil Rami did much of the marking on Cesc Fabregas, which (given how Spain played) pulled him in a number of different directions. Debuchy helped here, also. When Rami was taken too far out of position, that usually meant the ball was on the right, which allowed Debuchy to drop into that space.
    • As the half went on, Franck Ribery started going out to his normal left wing position, leaving France with an amorphous 4-5-1.
  • Nineteen minutes in, Iniesta destroyed all that planning. Yohan Cabaye (who had been playing on the right of France’s “2” level in midfield) came to support, help that seemed to cause some confusion. Debuchy and Revelliere didn’t know what to do without being able to use Iniesta as their indicator. This allowed left back Jordi Alba to blow down the flank and, after Iniesta had drawn everybody to him, get behind the defense and onto a through ball.
  • Alba’s cross from the left of the area was perfect, finding Alonso ghosting into the box, connecting with him 14 yards out (even with the right post). Alonso hit a perfect header to the left of Hugo Lloris, bouncing it four yards in front of the line and into goal.
  • But where was Alonso’s man? Replays showed Alonso start his run from near the center circle. Florent Malouda never broke out of a walk.
  • Another interesting first half tactical nuance was Sergio Busquets’ positioning. Spain employs a much-maligned double pivote, but in the first half against France, he was often positioned much higher than Alonso, at one point applying the pressure to the French defense. Was this a response to France’s lineup? Their set up? Until the goal, Spain played with two players at Xavi Hernández’s level of the field.
  • After the goal, France started to take more liberties going forward. They generated two crosses into the penalty area down their left side but failed to offset Spain’s possession dominance. The rest of the half had the same feel of Spain-Ireland’s first period – the holders having swapped their drive for a goal.
  • France maintained their approach, beginning the second half with the same set up. The only tweak was making Ribery into more of a forward, though the team’s best chances continued to come from their left side. In the 62nd and 71st minutes, France could have easily had equalizers, but nice reads from Iker Casillas snuffed out problems before they could take root.
  • Del Bosque tried to change things up, bringing on Pedro Rodríguez and Fernando Torres (France had already brought on Samir Nasri and Jeremy Menez). The substitutions had only one effect: More offside calls against Spain. Koscielny had a pretty easy time trapping Torres.
  • France continued to be the more dangerous side, but unable to offset Spain’s possession, they couldn’t sustain an attack. Their moments of pressure were too isolated to build on each other, preventing them from catching Spain off-guard.
  • Spain finally put the match away in extra time when Pedro drew a questionable penalty from Reveilliere, leaving them with a flattering scoreline.
  • The win gives Spain a semifinal a meeting with Portugal – 90 minutes that could prove very similar to what we just endured. Portugal has a recent win over Spain but are likely to erect a bunker. Cristiano Ronaldo and Nani offer new threats, but the conflict is the same: Can Portugal allocate the resources they need to hold Spain off while still providing a way to get the ball to their dangermen?

ProSoccerTalk is doing its best to keep you up to date on what’s going on in Poland and Ukraine. Check out the site’s Euro 2012 page and look at the site’s previews, predictions, and coverage of all the events defining UEFA’s championship.

USMNT: Brooks out with hip strain; World Cup qualifiers loom

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John Brooks is out of Hertha Berlin’s lineup “for the time being” after scans revealed a hip strain suffered in this weekend’s win over Wolfsburg.

That’s all Hertha has said, and that makes it hard to imagine whether American fans should be a little concerned or very concerned ahead of the USMNT’s World Cup qualifiers against Mexico, and Trinidad and Tobago in early June.

Brooks was unavailable for two weeks with an adductor strain in September, missing a month before returning to the starting lineup.

The U.S. center back pool isn’t teeming after Brooks and Geoff Cameron. Matt Besler, Tim Ream, Omar Gonzalez, and Walker Zimmerman were called up for the last World Cup qualifiers, and Gonzalez struggled but is a Bruce Arena favorite from their time in L.A.

WATCH: Snazzy Sargent goal leads U.S. U-17s past Mexico

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Josh Sargent scored a pretty goal as the United States Soccer program had another banner day against Mexico.

Nearly two months to the day after the U.S. U-20 side beat Mexico for the first time in 31 years, the U.S. U-17 topped El Tri for the first time ever. That win snapped Mexico’s 25-match unbeaten streak.

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The goal is the first of Sargent’s two goals, as the 16-year-old latched onto a long diagonal ball and used his right foot and head to move the ball into position for a strong shot.

The U.S. clinches a spot in the next round of U-17 World Cup qualifying with one match remaining in group play.

Sargent is from St. Louis and plays with Scott Gallagher-Missouri. Former Philadelphia Union coach John Hackworth coaches the U.S. U-17s.

Heads of South American soccer sent $128M in bank transfers

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SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) The leaders of South America’s soccer confederation transferred $128.6 million between 2000 and 2015 to personal accounts, suspicious accounts, or unauthorized third-party accounts, according to an audit released Wednesday by Ernst & Young.

According to the audit presented to the annual CONMEBOL congress in the Chilean capital, the confederation’s former president Nicolas Leoz transferred $26.9 million to his personal accounts. Leoz was the president for 27 years until resigning in 2013 for what he said were health reasons.

The audit also found $58 million in payments “to third parties without adequate documentation,” payments of $33.3 million to “unidentified accounts,” and $10.4 million to “suspicious third-parties.”

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“We had said that we would have four pillars, and the first two pillars were clear accounts and accountability,” said Alejandro Dominguez, the president of CONMEBOL who commissioned the audit last year. “Today we are accountable to the leaders and the whole world of football.”

Leoz, 88, is one of three ex-presidents of CONMEBOL accused on corruption charges by the United States Department of Justice. He is in Paraguay fighting extradition to the United States.

The South American body has been plagued by corruption, which was exposed two years ago during the FIFA scandal. Leoz’s two successors, Eugenio Figueredo and Juan Angel Napout, were both arrested on corruption charges.

“I’m here, I’m the manager” – Moyes will not quit Sunderland

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This has been one horrible stretch for David Moyes.

The Sunderland manager probably thought he’d been through the worst once he left Real Sociedad, where he went 12-15-15.

But he’s managed just seven wins and seven draws in 38 matches in charge of the Black Cats — an 18 percent win mark. He’s also been charged for threatening to slap a female journalist.

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And after Wednesday, Moyes has lost both of his derby matches against Middlesbrough.

Sunderland is 12 points back of safety with five matches left. The odds the Black Cats are headed for the Championship are somewhere north of 99 percent, and fans are calling for his job.

Well, he isn’t quitting. From the BBC:

“No, I’m here, I’m the manager, you take it on the chin. … I’m a football supporter, I know what it’s like. You don’t like seeing your team lose.

“There is nobody who wants to win more than me. I am used to winning, I’m not used to losing and I don’t want to get used to it either.”