ProSoccerTalk staff memories of Euro 2012:

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Yes, there were a few brush marks of ugly racism, but not nearly enough to truly stain a lovely European Championship tournament that just came and went.

The ProSoccerTalk staff quickly reflects on what they will best or most fondly remember when they think back on Euro 2012 from Poland and Ukraine:

Richard Farley

Andriy Shevchenko’s Ukraine swan song will always stick out. Though he went on to play two more times for his country, Shevchenko’s last hurrah will always be remembered as his second half double against Sweden – two goals that earned Ukraine their only victory at the championship they co-hosted.

The outburst came after a half where Shevchenko had looked his age, with commentators questioning whether the 35-year-old’s start was more ceremonial than deserved. Then, after Sweden had gone up one, Shevchenko summoned all the vigor of his Milan glory, heading home the twice to push Ukraine to the top of their group.

It was part of a stand-out tournament for some of Europe’s elder statesmen. Andrea Pirlo (33) was the tournament’s best player. Giorgos Karagounis (35) reminded us of 2004. Steve Gerrard (32) helped return hope to England. Xavi Hernández (32) hit top gear in the final.

None of those stories were the fairy tale. Shevchenko’s was. One week later, he announced his retirement from international soccer, his double against Sweden his final tallies for the national team. They were a part of a night few great players get to experience: Starring in a major tournament in front of your home nation.

Noah Davis

It didn’t end well for Italy, but to even make the final was an impressive feat. For me, the moment of the tournament came against Germany. Mario Balotelli beat the offsides, waited for the pass, took a touch, reached the 18-yard box, and ripped a shot. (The pace!) Manuel Neuer would have had a better chance stopping it if he was watching on television. Off went Balotelli’s shirt, down went my lower jaw. It was everything the young Italian represents: audacity, obnoxiousness, brilliance, and so much more. I’ll remember the Spanish domination in the final, but my favorite single image has to be shirtless Ballotelli flexing. It’s fine to let your actions scream “look at me” when you’ve just done something no one else can do.

Jenna Pel

It may not have impacted the course of the tournament, or heck, even determined who survived the group stage, but for the measure of unadulterated joy it elicited, I’m going with Jakob Błaszczykowski’s equalizer against Russia. The match was tinged with political tension that only upped the intensity.

Fate would ultimately see it differently, but at the time Russia and Poland were tipped as favorites to advance from Group A. Russia had arguably played the most convincing soccer of the tournament at that point while hosts Poland were eager to bring pride to its compatriots.

Facing a one-goal deficit and imminent elimination, Polish captain Jakob ‘Kuba’ Błaszczykowski came through with the most glorious of equalizers. The long-range screamer would end up being the final goal of Poland’s Euro 2012 campaign, and what an effort it was.

Steve Davis

I guess I’m a sucker for true fan passion, and probably for a lost cause, too. But when I think back on this tournament, about regal Spain and a more pleasing tactical way for Italy, about a German side that looked so capable before it fell to pieces in one stinker, about Shevchenko’s heart and Balotelli’s emotional eruption, about Zlatan Ibrahimović’s athletic feat of wonder … while I’m thinking about it all, I’ll be hearing the Irish fans reminding everyone what being a true fan is all about. I absolutely adored the 10 minutes the proud fans of the Republic of Ireland belted out “The Fields of Athenry” (an Irish folk ballad about stoicism in the face of suffering) as their team tumbled from the tournament in a loss to Spain.

That moment reminded us that supporters may suffer, but their love for their land and their team prevails.

Rapinoe, Morgan, Ertz lift US past South Korea, 3-1

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NEW ORLEANS (AP) Alex Morgan scored in a fourth straight game, Julie Ertz scored for the fourth time in five games, and the United States women beat South Korea 3-1 on Thursday night.

Megan Rapinoe added her 34th international goal and her 42nd assist.

Having assisted on Ertz’s diving header in the first half, Rapinoe scored on a penalty kick she drew in the 49th minute when pounced on a loose ball about 12 yards in front of the goal and was tripped by Ji Sohyun.

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Han Chaerin scored her first international goal in her South Korea debut to make it 2-1 just before the end of the first half.

U.S. forward Mallory Pugh had to leave the game late in the first half with a right hamstring injury. There was no immediate word on the severity of her injury after she was helped off the field by trainers.

Meanwhile, Carli Lloyd returned from a nine-week absence because of ankle injury, entering the game as a substitute in the 77th minute.

Midfielder Andi Sullivan started for the U.S. about 11 months after having reconstructive knee surgery. Her third minute shot narrowly missed the far post from about 18 yards. She was substituted out, as planned, at halftime.

South Korea began the game in a defensive posture and the U.S. maintained a decisive edge in possession, forcing Kang Gaae to make several sprawling saves before breaking though on Ertz goal in the 24th minute

Ertz dove in front of two defenders to redirect Rapinoe’s hard, low corner kick between the legs of Kang as the goal keeper tried to respond at the near post.

Morgan scored in the 40th minute, using her right foot to settle Kelley O’Hara’s bouncing pass from the end line, then pivoting and whipping her left foot through the ball from point-blank range. The goal was the 28-year-old Morgan’s 78th for the national squad.

Han scored against the run of play with a hard shot from about 25 yards that sailed beyond U.S. goal keeper Alyssa Naher’s reach before dipping under the cross bar.

Lloyd’s introduction drew an enthusiastic response from nearly 10,000 spectators in the Superdome. The two-time FIFA World Player of the Year missed a pair of U.S. exhibition wins over New Zealand last month because of an Aug. 13 ankle sprain in a National Women’s Soccer League match.

Forward Tobin Heath, who has an ankle injury, and defender Taylor Smith, who has an injured shoulder, were not in the lineup and are not expected to play in a second friendly scheduled between South Korea and the U.S. on Sunday in Cary, North Carolina.

Both women were hurt in the NWSL championship match.

UEFA charge Roma after racist chanting witnessed

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AS Roma and its fans could face severe penalties after alleged racist chants were hurled in the direction of Chelsea’s Antonio Rudiger.

It appears via broadcast footage from Chelsea’s 3-3 UEFA Champions League draw with Roma at Stamford Bridge this week that after shepherding a ball out of play, Rudiger was subjected to monkey noises and other racist abuse from the away end where the AS Roma fans were congregated.

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In the past, UEFA has ordered either partial or full closures of stadiums and announced fines to the clubs, though it doesn’t seem to have stamped out the problem of racist chanting in Europe.

Hopefully, UEFA will investigate this fully and ban the individuals who allegedly committed the chants.

Rudiger signed for Chelsea this past summer for a reported $44.8 million.

FIFA says deal close to resolve transfer system complaint

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ZURICH (AP) A complaint to the European Commission challenging soccer’s transfer market is set to be withdrawn by the global group of players’ unions, according to FIFA.

A formal complaint that the trading system is “anti-competitive, unjustified and illegal” was filed in Brussels two years ago by FIFPro.

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After a meeting Thursday of the FIFA stakeholders committee, soccer’s world governing body said a tentative agreement relating to unpaid player wages and transfer fees reached with FIFPro, European clubs and a global leagues’ group can help end the dispute next year.

“It was an issue that was stewing for a long, long, long time,” FIFA vice president Victor Montagliani told reporters after chairing the meeting. “Because of our impetus they came to an agreement.”

FIFPro, which has campaigned to let players terminate contracts after going unpaid for several weeks, cautiously welcomed its “constructive talks with FIFA.”

“(It’s) premature to discuss what might happen next regarding our legal complaint against the transfer system, or any prospective deal until we are satisfied with the proposals put forth,” the Netherlands-based union said.

FIFA has been open to reviewing a transfer system which has seemed weighted in favor of wealthy clubs and was widely criticized in the European summer trading window. Salary caps, limits on squad sizes and restricting loan deals have been suggested.

Representing 65,000 players, FIFPro had suggested its September 2015 filing threatened the biggest upheaval in transfer rules since the Bosman case in 1995.

Then, a European Court of Justice ruling gave players more freedom to move within the European Union and drove up salaries by letting clubs sign out-of-contract players without paying a transfer fee.

The tentative accord FIFA announced Thursday seeks to amend complex transfer regulations and better protect players and clubs from unpaid salaries and transfer fees.

Another shared goal is enforcing cases more efficiently with a clearer path to applying sanctions. Players can wait many months – and even years – pursuing claims for unpaid wages in FIFA judicial bodies.

FIFA’s ruling council must approve the accord next week at a meeting in India. A new draft of transfer regulations could then be put to the Council next March in Zurich, clearing FIFPro to drop its complaint case.

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Delegates at FIFA headquarters Thursday included English Premier League CEO Richard Scudamore and two-time Champions League winner Edwin van der Sar, now CEO at Ajax.

The session also discussed changing rules that govern players’ eligibility for national teams and switching allegiance, FIFA said.

However, talking points such as club salary caps, allowing an extra Copa America tournament in 2020 on the international match calendar, and issues around the 2022 World Cup in Qatar were not raised.

Report: USMNT interim manager to be named this weekend

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What’s next for the U.S. Men’s National Team?

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The first of many dominos may fall this weekend, according to ESPN FC.

The report states that the USMNT is likely to name its interim manager “some time this weekend,” however, U.S. Under-20 manager Tab Ramos likely won’t be the one named.

Ramos is reportedly seeking a full-time position as the USMNT boss, and the interim tag could be a turn off for the 51-year-old former national team midfielder.

U.S. Soccer president Sunil Gulati had stated following former U.S. manager Bruce Arena’s departure that he expected to make a decision in “seven to 10 days.” A decision this weekend would stick with Gulati’s original intentions.

The Americans will reconvene next month when they take on Portugal on Nov. 14 in an international friendly in Leiria.

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The match was originally scheduled to be played in Faro, but due to recent devastation in the are the fixture will be played in Leiria and all proceeds will go to the victims of wildfire damage. Portugal will also play a friendly four days prior to taking on the U.S. against Saudi Arabia at the same stadium.