Former USMNT head coach Bradley is making quite a name for himself in Norway.

“That” moment in U.S. Soccer qualifying


In social media funniness, they call it “that” moment.

You know, you say “that moment” and then attach an awkward or absurd moment. Let me give you a “for instance.” It goes like this:

That moment … when your team’s World Cup qualifying effort shows signs of unraveling, and when a million dreams of Brazil 2014 threaten fall apart faster than the U.S. midfield against Jamaica.

So, yeah, that moment.

I’m really just having a little fun with the collective, reactionary voice in U.S. Soccer supporters. I know everyone is a little freaked out over Friday’s result in Jamaica, the 2-1 Kingston clubbing delivered to Jurgen Klinsmann’s men.

But here’s the reason everybody should calm down a little:

Every World Cup qualifying cycle has that moment. Some have a couple of them. It’s a moment where panic and portent of misfortune begin to infiltrate supporters circles, and with potentially toxic effect.

It’s almost always a loss or a draw on the road (usually in Costa Rica), where everyone loses perspective and needs reminding that qualifiers on the road are painfully tricky business. I know everyone wants the United States to be the regional bully boy, to go romping and stomping through the field, never mind if the match in question is being played in dusty Guatemala City or humid San Jose, Costa Rica, or Kingston, Jamaica or wherever. Fact is, the United States just isn’t there yet.

None of this means that questions don’t need to be asked about yesterday’s contest, where the defense looked OK, but where the game plan and personnel choices may have been half-baked, the midfield trio failed at basic tasks and the forwards – well, in all honesty they didn’t get the ball enough to make many quality assessments.

(MORE: Talking points off Friday’s match)

So, we can, have and will again visit about all that before Tuesday’s must-win in Columbus featuring the same two sides.

Still, let’s remember that nothing is lost just yet. Two of four teams in this group advance to final stage qualifying, and the United States has three winnable matches remaining.

So … what does history say about that moment? Let’s look?

World Cup 1998: On June 27, 1997, a 1-1 draw in El Salvador left the United States with a 1-1-3 record after five matches in final stage qualifying. That’s why the subsequent 1-0 win over Costa Rica in Portland was nothing less than massive. (I was lucky enough to be there; it remains today one of the best soccer experiences I’ve had – and I have been to four World Cups.) After two more draws, Steve Sampson’s team clinched a spot at France 98 with one contest to spare.

World Cup 2002 (semifinal round): Semifinal round qualifying in 2002 did not go smoothly. A tie right away in Guatemala and a subsequent loss at Costa Rica had fans falling over sideways. After two wins put things back on track, a scoreless tie in (you may want to close your eyes for a second) Columbus left Bruce Arena’s team requiring a win in Barbados to ensure passage to the final round of qualifying. (And at one point in Barbados, the United States was 25 minutes away from being out. As in OUT!)

World Cup 2002 (final round): A 2-0 loss late in final stage qualifying in Costa Rica threatened the effort. Arena’s men got back on track with a 2-1 win over Jamaica in Foxboro. (That match was memorable for what most fans didn’t see: the match itself, which was preempted by news reports of the war beginning in Afghanistan.

World Cup 2006: A tie with Jamaica in Kingston, a win over El Salvador in Foxborough and a draw with Panama in Panama City may sound OK. In the end, it was. But that draw in Panama came courtesy of a late Cobi Jones strike. And the draw in Jamaica had been a similar nail-biter. So, U.S. Soccer fandom was not feeling great about things. Then, in final round qualifying, a 2-1 loss in Mexico City may have been more palatable – except that it was the second contest. So, low-level panic ensued.

World Cup 2010: Remember when the United States always lost in Mexico City? Yeah, those were the bad ol’ days. Except that everybody conveniently forgot about that when Bob Bradley’s men lost at Azteca (again!) on Aug. 12, 2009, making things a little close for comfort en route to South Africa 2010. The United States (and its concerning penchant for conceding early leads) stood 3-2-1 in final stage qualifying, still in reasonable shape, but moving into an absolute must-win match in Salt Lake City against El Salvador.

LINEUPS: Tim Howard starts for USMNT against Costa Rica

SALVADOR, BRAZIL - JULY 01:  Tim Howard of the United States gestures during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Round of 16 match between Belgium and the United States at Arena Fonte Nova on July 1, 2014 in Salvador, Brazil.  (Photo by Jamie McDonald/Getty Images)
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The United States takes on Costa Rica in a friendly tonight at Red Bull Arena, as the USMNT must put the Mexico match behind them and focus on the upcoming World Cup qualifiers.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s USMNT coverage ]

The biggest inclusion in tonight’s starting XI is that of Tim Howard in goal, marking his return to the national side after taking a self-imposed sabbatical. It will be Howard’s first appearance for the USMNT since his legendary performance against Belgium in the 2014 World Cup.

Klinsmann has chosen to go with a 4-4-2 tonight, and Geoff Cameron remains the only starter in the back-line from the Mexico match. He’ll partner with Michael Orozco in the center of defense, with Brad Evans and Tim Ream on the outsides.

[ MORE: Fabian Johnson sent home from USMNT after fall-out with Klinsmann ]

In the midfield, Klinsmann has put some speed on the wings through the likes of DeAndre Yedlin and recent call-up Brek Shea. Danny Williams joins Jermaine Jones as the central midfielders.

Up top, Jozy Altidore will play alongside Gyasi Zardes, who returns to his more comfortable position as forward.

Cristiano Ronaldo wins record fourth European Golden Boot

MADRID, SPAIN - OCTOBER 13:  Real Madrid football player Cristiano Ronaldo poses with his four Golden Boot Awards as maximun goal scorer of European leagues at The Westin Palace Hotel on October 13, 2015 in Madrid, Spain.  (Photo by Gonzalo Arroyo Moreno/Getty Images)
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Cristiano Ronaldo has added another trophy to the collection, winning his fourth Golden Boot as Europe’s top scorer for the 2014-15 season.

The award accounts for goals in league play only, which means the Champions League and domestic tournaments are not included. In La Liga, Ronaldo scored 48 goals in 35 appearances.

[ MORE: 2015 MLS playoff scenarios ]

Ronaldo first won the award after the 2007-08 season with Manchester United, and has now added three more with Real Madrid in 2010-11, 2013-14, and 2014-15.

With his fourth win, Ronaldo moves ahead of Lionel Messi as the only player to win the award four times. Messi has won three, while eight players have won two.

Below is a post from Ronaldo’s Facebook page reflecting on the award:

What a special moment in my professional life!

Winning four Golden Boots is a privilege for me and I’ll keep challenging myself because I want to do better every time and I want to keep chasing for more records.

I have to thank everyone in Real Madrid that made this possible and we want to keep winning more titles and more trophies. Thank you everyone.

Ronaldo alone scored more goals in La Liga play last season than 14 clubs did, which shows how prolific his season was. The only player to score more than 48 league goals in a European season was Messi, who scored 50 in 2011-12.

[ EURO 2016: A look at the 20 teams that have qualified for France ]

While it was a successful year for Ronaldo personally, it was a very disappointing campaign for Real Madrid, who fired manager Carlo Ancelotti after finishing the season without a trophy.