High school soccer

U.S. Soccer federation is out of bounds on this one; prohibiting high school soccer is wrong


I wrote my first article about the club soccer-high school soccer conflict when I was … in high school. That was in the 80s.

So this debate and discussion is nothing new. Periodically we get the next significant media piece about it; a good one landed in Saturday’s New York Times. Using pointed and poignant examples, it once again examines the issue of elite club soccer creating rules that prohibit young people from playing high school soccer.

Specifically, this story is about the United States Soccer federation’s decision to officially prohibit players in its 80 affiliated academies from participating in high school soccer.

I’ve been consistent all along, and this one really gets me going:

This is soccer in our country at its very worst. This is adults making decisions based on what’s best for the establishment, for the clubs and for the adults, not what’s best for kids. And it stinks.

Since I’ve trampled this ground before, I’ll be brief. High school soccer is cool. Kids like it. It is about community and about sharing athletic experiences with people close in life, and it is part of the American cultural experience. To deny it in the name of developing “world class talent” is getting a lot of wrong fish caught up in the net.

When clubs, with the official sanction of the United States Soccer federation in this case, prohibit high school soccer, things have gone very wrong and they have lost all broader perspective.

Essentially, in the stretch to develop a select few world class players, the deciders are prohibiting thousands of young players from doing something most would enjoy.

What’s possibly worse, by providing official backing for this wrongheaded notion, the federation has empowered clubs beyond the 80 affiliated academy clubs to discourage or prohibit high school soccer. That super stinks, because that represents a more egregious level of club self-interest at work.

If the idea is to produce world class players, as we are told, then this represents ridiculous overreach at very best, and the outright shilling of false hope at worst. Because only the very tip top of this group, even a fairly elite group like this, will ever play professional soccer. And only the very tip top of that group is destined to become a globally recognized star.

This weekend’s story, like some of the others, makes the case that the elite clubs aim is to emulate player development models abroad. Which is fine…if you’re abroad. But we are not. Societies are different, and ours certainly is.

source:  Scholastic sports aren’t valued in other countries the way they are here. My guess: If high school athletics were part of the social fabric in some of these other cultures, they would find ways to incorporate this growth experience within the soccer developmental mechanisms.

Bottom line: They say they want to develop players, and fair enough. But what about developing young people?

This isn’t difficult.  Generally speaking, the next world star looks like the next world star by the time he or she is 14. Maybe earlier. That person probably doesn’t need to play high school soccer.

But for about 98 or 99 percent of this group, this is a disservice. It serves the interest of clubs, helping to make the upper end of youth soccer look and feel more important than it really is in the bigger life picture.

Emerson Hyndman says he wishes to leave Fulham amid contract standoff

LONDON, ENGLAND - APRIL 28: Emerson Hyndman of Fulham celebrates after scoring the team's second goal during the FA Youth Cup Final: First Leg match between Fulham and Chelsea at Craven Cottage on April 28, 2014 in London, England. (Photo by Charlie Crowhurst/Getty Images)
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Emerson Hyndman is stuck in an endless circle at his home club Fulham, and the only way out he sees would be to leave.

With his contract set to expire in the upcoming summer, Fulham has been pushing hard for the 19-year-old to lock down a long-term deal as many of his teammates have done in the recent months. Unfortunately, due to reported interest from abroad from teams like Borussia Dortmund, plus others in La Liga and the Dutch Eredivisie, Hyndman has been unwilling to do so thus far.

As a result, the USMNT prospect has seen little playing time, with manager Kit Symons understandably unwilling to let him see the field while he refuses to commit his future to the club. Hyndman has just eight minutes of League Cup play to his name so far this campaign.

Hyndman blames the lack of action as the main reason why he wants to depart, telling American Soccer Now’s Brian Sciaretta that he would like to move on.

“It’s a little difficult right now,” he said. “I’ve told them in the past that I think it’s time for me to move on. There are clubs out there that are interested and that I am excited about, so it’s difficult for me right now, and I can’t see myself getting too many first-team minutes. I feel that I had a good preseason, and I thought I might get a chance, but I am really looking forward to the future more than anything.

Unfortunately, that seems a bit unfair to his club. Why would a Championship club looking to build from within give significant minutes to a player who refuses to sign a long-term deal and looks set to leave in the summer? Then he tags the lack of playing time as the reason he wants to leave. It all seems to be a never-ending cycle.

Hyndman joined the Fulham youth setup at age 15 and flourished last season, making both his club first-team debut and earning a cap with the senior national team. He is currently with the U-23 Olympic team leading the charge for Rio 2016 qualification.

There is no doubting Hyndman’s abilities on the field, but for his sake, he needs to sort out his club situation as quickly as possible to further his growth as a midfielder.

Report: David Silva out 2-3 weeks with ligament damage

LOGRONO, SPAIN - OCTOBER 09:  David Silva of Spain is fouled by Lars Gerson of Luxembourg during the UEFA EURO 2016 Qualifier group C match between Spain and Luxembourg at Estadio Municipal Las Gaunas on October 9, 2015 in Logrono, Spain.  (Photo by Denis Doyle/Getty Images)
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Despite sitting at the top of the table in the Premier League, things are not going well for Manchester City.

Star striker and leading goalscorer Sergio Aguero suffered a torn hamstring while playing for Argentina, and now he is joined by David Silva on the injured list.

Silva lasted nine minutes in Spain’s EURO qualifying match against Luxembourg, forced off after taking a bad challenge from behind. Silva went down in pain and tried to play on, but asked for a substitution just minutes later.

[ RELATED: Alejandro Bedoya to miss USMNT vs. Mexico ]

Spanish news outlet AS is reporting that Silva has suffered “lateral internal ligament damage in his right ankle,” and could face 2-3 weeks on the sidelines.

With Aguero set to miss at least a month, Silva’s injury could leave Manchester City without two of their top players in the coming weeks.

Silva has arguably been the best player in the Premier League this season, the quarterback of the City attack, which has scored a league-leading 19 goals through eight matches.

City travels to Old Trafford for the Manchester derby on October 25, which falls into that 2-3 week range for Silva’s recovery. In a match that could decide who sits top of the table, Manuel Pellegrini would be very shorthanded without Silva and Aguero.