U.S. national soccer player Landon Donovan controls the ball during a practice session at the Azteca stadium in Mexico City

PST U.S. Men’s National Team Depth Chart: “Attacking” Midfelders

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Even if we had to make a tough call on where to slot Jozy Altidore, the forwards were easy, but as we track back in through the U.S. Men’s national team formation, things get tougher.

We’re also not doing ourselves any favors with our depth charts. Because there seems to be two distinctly different classes of midfielders in Jurgen Klinsmann’s team, we’re breaking the position up. Later we’ll post the central midfielders’ depth chart, while now, we’re posting the “other” guys.

I note “other” because it’s hard to come up with a good way to describe them. They’re basically players who are less-likely to compete with the Bradleys, Joneses, and Edus for time. Sometimes they’re deployed wide while on the same level, but most of the time they’re in more advanced positions, usually (but not always) wider.

We’re calling them attackers, but expect this caveat to appear in every update: Here, “attacking” is synonymous with “other”.

But before all those caveats suck the fun out of this exercise, let’s get to the depth chart, one with a familiar name at the top.

1. Landon Donovan, 30, LA Galaxy

Graham Zusi’s performance in Columbus showed how much Landon Donovan’s been missed, if ironically so. While Zusi performed well against Jamaica (forming a nice tandem with Steve Cherundolo down the right), that’s standard fare for Donovan, who is also capable of adding a touch of the spectacular with a dash of the heroic. Jurgen Klinsmann’s rarely had Donovan and Clint Dempsey at his disposal. He won’t this week, either.

2. Graham Zusi, 26, Sporting Kansas City

So what if he’s not Donovan? He’s still somebody the program’s coming to trust. He didn’t start in Kingston, but inserted into the starting XI to provide some attacking nous in Ohio, Zusi stepped up. It’s a cliché (saying somebody “stepped up”), but it’s also something other players have failed to do – make an impact when they finally get their chance. Thanks to that impact, the U.S. should be in decent shape this week, with Zusi again filling in for Landon Donovan.

3. Brek Shea, 22, FC Dallas

Shea is the only true wide attacker regularly used by Klinsmann – somebody that wide week-in, week-out plays wide for both club and country. Like Donovan, Shea will miss this week’s qualifiers, eliminated from consideration after U.S. Soccer doctors deemed him unfit to go. Although fan opinion is mixed on the FC Dallas star’s effectiveness, he represents a meaningful way to change things should the attack falter. He will be missed.

4. Jose Torres, 24, Pachuca (Mexico)

Torres is another of Klinsmann’s “other” midfielders who’s injured, though after his performance last break, it’s unclear he’ll be missed. Torres has received plenty of chances to assert his place in the team and has consistently given lackluster performances. Klinsmann, however, may see things differently. When things needed to be changed after Kingston, Torres was one of the answers. The reviews may be mixed, but the boss’s loyalty has yet to waver.

5. Joe Corona, 22, Tijuana (Mexico)

You get the feeling Corona is inching closer to playing time, but with the senior team, he’s yet to see meaningful minutes. But by now, the Tijuana attacker is a consistent presence in Klinsmann’s squads, his strong performance for the U-23s helping to solidify his place in the setup. While he’s not a wide player in the mold of Shea, Corona often plays on the flank for Xolos. With few other options on the bench, Klinsmann may turn to Corona this week when he looks to change things up.

6. Sacha Kljestan, 27, Anderlecht (Belgium)

He may spend most of his time playing near central midfielder Lucas Biglia in Belgium, but given the U.S. squad’s strengths, if Sacha’s going to make an impact, it’s likely going to be in another spot. His versatility allows him to be used in a more attacking role – in wider areas, if need be. It’s part of the reason why many felt Kljestan should have been called up for previous qualifiers.

7. Josh Gatt, 21, Molde (Norway)

Like Eddie Johnson and Alan Gordon this week, Josh Gatt was recalled for tactical reasons against Jamaica, though an injury kept him from playing (what’s with all the injuries to U.S. attacking midfielders?). Plus speed makes it likely Gatt will be recalled for future qualifiers, depending on this opponent. This year in Norway, he’s already doubled the scoring output of last year’s Tippeligaen debut. His six goals in 16 appearances are third on Molde’s league-leading squad.

8. Mix Diskerud, 22, Rosenburg (Norway)

Diskerud’s back in Norway after an unsuccessful spell in Belgium, one that did little to help his quest to break into the senior national team. Although he was a big part of the U-23 side that failed to qualify for London, Mix has yet to appear for the senior squad in a full international. Lately, he’s flirted with the idea of playing for Norway, having been born in Oslo. While the Norwegians seem keen on getting Diskerud capped, Klinsmann ise taking a more straight-up approach. He’s not calling Diskerud in just to lock him down.

9. DaMarcus Beasley, 30, Puebla (Mexico)

If the U.S. lacks wide players, Beasley’s an option, and while it seems like the veteran would be a reach, he was called in for the win at Azteca. Being based in Mexico may have helped, but it was also a chance to get on Jurgen Klinsmann’s radar. A veteran of three World Cups, Beasley’s not completely out of the picture for a fourth.

10. Benny Feilhaber, 27, New England Revolution

Feilhaber hasn’t been called in since January’s camp, a sad step back from somebody who was automatic under Bob Bradley. Watching him for New England, it’s not hard to understand why. Feilhaber’s been good, not great, and it’s unclear where exactly he’d play for Klinsmann. As he moves to being a more central option for Jay Heaps, Feilhaber looks more and more like somebody who will be competing against some locked-in players on for the national team.

Mourinho: Leicester home should be Claudio Ranieri Stadium

MANCHESTER, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 24:  Claudio Ranieri, Manager of Leicester City shows his frustration as Jose Mourinho, Manager of Manchester United looks on during the Premier League match between Manchester United and Leicester City at Old Trafford on September 24, 2016 in Manchester, England.  (Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)
Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images
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Jose Mourinho cannot quite get his head around Leicester City’s firing of Claudio Ranieri.

The story is on the tips of the tongues of many in the Premier League, and Manchester United’s boss is no exception.

[ MORE: UEL draw | Who is Rostov? ]

Speaking Friday ahead of United’s EFL Cup Final against Southampton, here’s what Mourinho had to say.

From the BBC:

“He deserves the Leicester stadium to be named ‘Claudio Ranieri Stadium’. The most beautiful thing in the Premier League and one of most beautiful in football history.

“Now Leicester are in the highlights again with a decision that has everyone in football united. It’s very difficult to accept. It’s important to realize how football is and we need to react. I was sacked as a champion [by Chelsea], a giant negative as I thought – peanuts compared to Claudio.

“I don’t think he needs more. Nobody can do what he did. If some of the stories have just a little bit of truth, it is difficult to find words to justify but we have to be able to cope.”

Mourinho is giving voice to what many feel, this writer included. Ranieri is in a relegation fight, yes, but to fire him days after the Foxes stole a road goal against Sevilla that gives them reasonable odds to advance in the UEFA Champions League? It’s an odd one, and smacks a bit of, “Well, we can’t fire him if he beats Liverpool or Sevilla”.

Liverpool visits the King Power Stadium this weekend, and the Foxes will need an incredible response at home to topple the rested Reds. Sure the Premier League is win now, but add me to the chorus who thinks the new manager will have the same odds to fix Leicester as Ranieri.

Roma’s American president losing patience over stadium delay

James Pallotta, AS Roma
AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino
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ROME (AP) Roma’s American president is starting to lose patience with city officials over long-delayed plans for a new stadium.

Ahead of a meeting between municipal authorities and club officials Friday, James Pallotta issued a statement saying the team expects “a massively positive result” from the encounter.

Pallotta adds “the alternative would be catastrophic for the future of AS Roma, Italian football, the city of Rome, and quite frankly for future business in Italy.”

[ MORE: PST feature on Pallotta ]

The mostly privately financed 1.6 billion euro ($1.7 billion) project received another setback this week when cultural authorities announced plans to declare the proposed stadium site – an abandoned hippodrome – as a site of “particularly important interest.”

The project in Tor di Valle, halfway between downtown and Leonardo Da Vinci Airport, also includes three office towers.

Who is Manchester United’s UEL opponent Rostov?

MOSCOW, RUSSIA - OCTOBER 15: Jano Ananidze (L) of FC Spartak Moscow is challenged by Alexandru Gatcan of FC Rostov during the Russian Premier League match between FC Spartak Moscow v FC Rostov at Otkrytie Arena Stadium on October 15, 2016 in Moscow, Russia. (Photo by Epsilon/Getty Images)
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Jose Mourinho and Manchester United have learned their fate for the UEFA Europa League’s Round of 16.

The Red Devils face Russian side FC Rostov in the next round of the tournament, four victorious ties from claiming an automatic spot in the UEFA Champions League.

[ MORE: Spurs sent packing | Full UEL draw ]

So who is Rostov? Seventh in the Russian Premier League standings, Selmashi finished second last season and won the league in 1994 and 2008.

Rostov entered the Europa League after a run through the Champions League which saw the club knock out Anderlecht and Ajax, both still alive in the UEL, before finishing third behind Atletico Madrid and Bayern Munich in the group stage. Rostov beat Sparta Prague in the Round of 32 of the UEL.

The club is led by former Moldova boss Ivan Daniliants. Its leading scorer is left wing Dmitri Poloz with 11 goals, and Ecuadorian national teamer Christian Noboa and Moldova veteran Alexandru Gațcan among its mainstays.

While some will make the case that a rough pitch, long trip, and stingy team makes this draw a bad one for United, Mourinho’s crew should triumph. How worse could it have been? This one won’t be easy, but consider Roma, Schalke, Borussia Monchengladbach… even a reunion with Memphis Depay and Lyon would bring more of a challenge than Rostov.

Europa League draw: Man Utd learns fate

Manchester United's Henrikh Mkhitaryan, center back to camera, celebrates scoring the opening goal with Zlatan Ibrahimovic, 2nd right, and other teammates during a Europa League round of 32 second leg soccer match between Saint Etienne and Manchester United at Geoffroy Guichard stadium in Saint Etienne, France, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. (AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani)
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The travel is tricky, but Manchester United’s draw for the UEFA Europa League Round of 16 could’ve been much worse.

The Red Devils are off to Russia to face FC Rostov in the next round of the UEL competition.

[ MORE: Spurs out | Who is Rostov? ]

In another draw that leads you to question whether there’s anything random about it all, United and lone La Liga representative Celta Vigo drew winnable matches against Russian clubs, Roma has a tantalizing match against Lyon, and an all-Bundesliga match hits the docket.

Heck, we’ll even see an all-Belgian tie between Gent vs. Genk.

And in a draw which will have many glued to their sets, USMNT left-sided man Fabian Johnson will help Borussia Monchengladbach against German rivals Schalke. The first leg comes five days after the pair face off in Bundesliga play.

The Round of 16 legs will be played March 9 and 16.

UEFA Europa League Round of 16

Rostov vs. Manchester United
Celta Vigo vs. Krasnodar
Copenhagen vs. Ajax
Olympiacos vs. Besiktas
Lyon vs. Roma
Schalke vs. Borussia Monchengladbach
APOEL Nicosia vs. Anderlecht
Gent vs. Genk