Mexico v United States

Landon Donovan acknowledges some damage to U.S. national team relationships


Landon Donovan’s increasingly tenuous status on the national team remains topical, and last night the national team’s all-time leading scorer had something quite interesting to say about it.

During ESPN’s national MLS broadcast, the network aired a pre-recorded interview with Donovan, a veteran of three World Cups.

Julie Foudy asked Donovan if his inability to join the national team for no more than 8 of Jurgen Klinsmann’s first 20 matches in charge has affected his relationship with the manager? Donovan acknowledged that it probably has … but he didn’t stop there.

It has probably affected my relationship with everybody on that team. You know, when you’re a guy who has never been hurt, for the most part, and then all the sudden you you have all these injuries, I think people begin questioning it. Maybe he’s faking it. Maybe he’s not really hurt. Maybe he doesn’t want to come in. And that’s really frustrating. Candidly that’s hurtful.”

Hurtful, I’m certain, because Donovan has generally been healthy and available and has always answered the country’s call – even when he surely could have used a break.

(MORE: Donovan and the Galaxy prep for tonight’s playoff opener)

So, yes it is probably hurtful – but is it even true? Are there teammates, coaches and staff that really begrudge Donovan, a guy who has played hurt, who has jumped the marketing and PR hoops for more than decade for the national program, for MLS and for the game in general? Truly, he has been the face of domestic soccer since 2002 or thereabouts.

It certainly is possible that some creeping, internal animus has sprouted. This has been a period of national team change, including some relatively difficult moments during a window where Klinsmann is asking a lot from the national team regulars, trying to squeeze every drop of talent and production from the group. Donovan has been largely absent for the transition – and he is suggesting that his inability to go all-in has been misinterpreted or unfairly scrutinized by people he respects.

Truly, only those inside the U.S. locker room can know the answer to that question, and the extent to which any friction has developed.

FYI, if the Los Angeles Galaxy advance to Major League Soccer’s conference finals, Donovan will not be available as Klinsmann’s U.S. side closes out the 2012 season.

The United States faces Russia in Krasnodar; Kickoff is set for 10 a.m. ET on ESPN2.

In “pretty good listener” Klopp, Liverpool has breath of fresh air

Jurgen Klopp, Liverpool FC
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In some ways, all managers are the same: intelligent football men messing around with the puzzle that is winning matches.

But to listen to Jurgen Klopp’s introductory press conference is to get a different view. While some managers sound like they create the puzzles, or even create the game itself, Klopp speaks of the challenge with reverence.

[ MORE: Klopp unveiled as “the Normal One” ]

In other words, it seems unlikely we will be hearing him utter phrases designed at painting himself as a Picasso of the pitch, rather that of a museum curator.

For example, here’s the new Liverpool boss on the club’s history.

From JPW on Merseyside:

“Twenty-five years ago [since the last league title] is a long time,” Klopp said. “History is only the base for us, [we shouldn’t] keep the history in our backpack all day. I want to see the first step next week and not always compare with other times. This is a great club with big potential. Everything is there. Let’s try to start a new way. Everything is different – I don’t know it all but I’m a pretty good listener.”

The “normal one” speaks like an honor student, not the know-it-all professor demanding students regurgitate facts from the book he wrote and tossed on the syllabus.

And perhaps this is the manner in which the Reds will add a new, positive chapter to their storied history.

Kreis, Schmid dismiss Messing’s job switch comments

Sigi Schmid
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Broadcaster and New York soccer hero Shep Messing caused quite a stir with his comments during the Red Bulls/Impact match on Wednesday, and those words have cause plenty of reaction in MLS.

If you missed it, Messing claims that New York City FC is ready to move on from Jason Kreis after just one season, and that Seattle coach Sigi Schmid is set to swap jobs with the NYC boss.

Messing also claims that Caleb Porter could end his disappointing run in Portland to head back to college soccer.

Kreis and Schmid disagree. The latter says he loves the Sounders and is committed to bringing an MLS Cup to Seattle. Kreis was just flabbergasted.


“I was watching the game last night, and it caught me completely by surprise. I thought that was an absolutely ludicrous statement and unfounded,” Kreis said after training Thursday. “I have no knowledge of that information at all, and I kind of scratch my head because at the end of the day I’m very happy here.”

So is there any truth here? The Porter part makes sense, especially if the Timbers fail to make the postseason again and the brash coach wishes to go back to a place where he’s had success.

As for Schmid and Kreis, that’s a curious one. Maybe NYC’s star studded roster would like a change, and Schmid has more success with big egos. And Kreis would thrive just about anywhere, but why would NYC ditch a man who built this from scratch? They’ve invested so much in the ex-RSL legend.