Vancouver Whitecaps v Los Angeles Galaxy - Knockout Round

Looking back at five minutes that defined Vancouver’s season

Leave a comment

It took only five minutes to sum up the Vancouver Whitecaps’ 2012 season, a second half span that turned a potential Vancouver upset into the expected result. Los Angeles put an end to the Whitecaps season, 2-1, helped by all mixed blessings that defined an uneven Whitecaps campaign.

It started in the 68th minute, Vancouver carrying the one-goal lead stolen in the third minute when Darren Mattocks placed a ball inside Josh Saunders’ left post. The lead persisted for over an hour before the five-seed had a chance to put one foot in the semifinals, a counter attack creating a three-on-three in front of LA’s goal. Matt Watson played a ball to Kenny Miller, whose flick back to the midfielder produced a hard shot from 16 yards on Saunders. The block went to Miller who couldn’t get a shot on goal, a deflection sent to Barry Robson in the right of the box. When he too couldn’t get a shot on frame, Los Angeles survived a chance that should have ended their title defense.

MORE: Drilling down on Thursday night’s result

The attack was emblematic of all the shortcomings Vancouver’s seen in their two Scottish imports. Kenny Miller, who started the game on the bench, did well to make a run that opened up space behind him. When Watson played him the first pass, he made a nice flick back into the space. Up until he had to shoot, Miller was great, but for a designated player brought in to score goals, the end product matters. When Saunders’ save on Watson’s shot fell to him, the former Rangers star was slow releasing a shot that was eventually blocked.

Why Miller was even in the game was a mystery. At this point, there’s little doubt Darren Mattocks is the superior player, yet much to his chagrin, the Vancouver rookie was replaced in the 59th minute. Was he too tired to continue? It didn’t seem like it. The teams were only 14 minutes into the second half. Up 1-0, Rennie just wanted Miller on the pitch. In the face of a half-season’s worth of evidence, he was the man trusted to help close out the upset.

Then there’s Robson, whose surly attitude and underwhelming production have made him Vancouver’s biggest disappointment. The midfielder’s had the misfortune of being ill-cast as the savior of Vancouver’s attack, Rennie often setting up with the assumption the Scottish import can be an effective playmaker. But that’s never happened. Vancouver was more potent at the beginning of the season than at its end, when a switch to a 4-3-1-2 formation doubled Rennie’s bet on his underperforming dynamo.

One minute after Robson’s hesitation allowed LA to close him down, the Galaxy had won a corner. In the process, Jay DeMerit was hurt, David Beckham having run through his right leg. As DeMerit lay injured, LA played short. Juninho eventually crossed for Mike Magee, who took advantage of poor marking by Robson to equalize. Of course Vancouver wouldn’t yield until DeMerit was broken, and of course, Robson would be involved in the goal.

DeMerit would never return, left to rock back-and-forth on the bench, writhing in pain as Martin Bonjour took his place in the 70th minute. As if anybody needed proof of DeMerit’s value to Vancouver, his absence decided their season. Landon Donovan’s run behind Bonjour found the Argentine’s outstretched left arm. Down he went, drawing Silviu Petrescu’s whistle before the Galaxy captain eventually launched a 73rd-minute match-winner into the left side netting.

So there stood Vancouver, emasculated over the course of five minutes. Their promising start had slipped through their fingers, leaving them to fight their way back with Miller and Robson leading the attack while Jay DeMerit sat on the bench. Yes, they’d made the playoffs, and yes, they’d proved more formidable that anybody expected. But if there was one way Vancouver had to end their season, that was it – reminded of everything that defined 2012.

Brazilian midfielder Fred has doping ban extended to club, out until June

VIENNA, AUSTRIA - AUGUST 19:  Fred of Donetsk goes for a header during the UEFA Champions League: Qualifying Round Play Off First Leg match between SK Rapid Vienna and FC Shakhtar Donetsk on August 19, 2015 in Vienna, Austria.  (Photo by Christian Hofer/Getty Images)
Getty Images
Leave a comment

Shakhtar Donetsk striker Fred, a regular for the Brazilian national team, has seen his CONMEBOL doping ban extended worldwide to all competitions.

A FIFA disciplinary committee announced that Fred’s suspension now covers “all types of matches, including domestic, international, friendly and official fixtures.”

The 22-year-old tested positive for the diuretic hydrochlorothiazide during last summer’s Copa America, and has not played for the Brazilian national team since, having been banned for a year by CONMEBOL. He had been playing for his Ukranian club while FIFA was reviewing the case, making 12 appearances in league play and scoring two goals. He also played six times in the Champions League without scoring a goal.

The one-year ban is back-dated to Fred’s last international squad appearance, when he was on the bench for the Copa America quarterfinals on June 27 of last summer. That date will allow Fred to be eligible for the Rio Olympics, which start August 5.

Men In Blazers podcast: Irvine Welsh Pod Special

Men In Blazers - Sept. 22
Leave a comment

Rog talks with “Trainspotting” author Irvine Welsh about his new novel “A Decent Ride,” unconventional career arc, and love for West Ham United/Hibernian.

Listen to the latest pod by clicking play below.

All of the MiB content — pods, videos and stories can be seen here, but to really stay in touch, follow, subscribe, click here:

Subscribe to the podcast OR to update your iTunes subscriptions ]

Click here for the RSS feed ]

LA Galaxy newcomer Ashley Cole takes responsibility for previous MLS quote

CARSON, CA - FEBRUARY 5: Ashley Cole #3 of the Los Angeles Galaxy speaks after he was introduced during a news conference at StubHub Center February 5, 2016, in Carson, California. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Wireimage)
Getty Images
Leave a comment

During Ashley Cole‘s introductory press conference today, where the former Chelsea legend was officially unveiled by the LA Galaxy to the media alongside Belgian defender Jelle Van Damme, a predictable question came his way.

Cole was asked about comments he made a year and a half ago when he joined AS Roma, where he said he turned down offers from Major League Soccer because he didn’t want to go “relax on the beach.”

The 35-year-old took responsibility for the quote, saying, “Of course, I hold my hands up, it was said.” However, he defended himself saying he was baited into the comments by the Italian reporter.

“I’m not going to come here and try to defend myself,” Cole said. “It was said, but it was for sure taken out of content. I was talking to the reporter, and he kind of said it to me, ‘We’re glad to have you at Roma. We didn’t expect you to be here, we thought you would go and relax on the beach.'”

“Of course you have to understand, I was at a new team, I have to tell the fans at Roma I was here to fight, I was there to win things and play in the Champions League.”

Cole said he spoke to Steven Gerrard, Frank Lampard, and Robbie Keane about the league before deciding to join Major League Soccer. “I know it’s going to be hard for me for sure, but I’m happy to be here, I’m going to work as hard as I can, change a few views on me being here, and we’ll see. I’m a winner, I always want to win, I didn’t come here to sit on the beach – to rest – I’m here to play football and work hard. I’m not a diva, I’m not this egotistical guy that comes and thinks he’s bigger than anyone.”

3 key battles for USMNT against Canada

CARSON, CA - JANUARY 31:  Jozy Altidore #17 of the United States chases down a pass against Iceland during the first half at StubHub Center on January 31, 2016 in Carson, California.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
Getty Images
Leave a comment

The United States takes on Canada in the second of two matches throughout January camp to test those brought in and see who stands out.

They took out Iceland in the first match, and now the Canadians stand in the way at the Stubhub Center in Carson, CA at 10:30 on Friday night.

[ PREVIEW: Get the full look at US vs Canada ]

Head coach Jurgen Klinsmann no doubt has already run through is list of positives and negatives in the win over Iceland. While the win is nice, the overriding purpose here is to both evaluate certain players and determine the best formula for success moving forward into World Cup qualifying, the Copa America, and the Olympics.

So, with that in mind, here are three key matchups to keep an eye on as the USMNT players battle both Canada and each other for spots on the roster in future meaningful games.

1) United States attack vs Canada’s organization

The US was solid in possession against Iceland, but it came against an opponent that showed a more attacking intent and also appeared to have limited motivation. Canada would not be what you call a “defensive” team, but they are very organized under Benito Floro, and it shows. They’ve conceded 1 or 0 goals in each of their last 13 matches, losing just once across that time. Their goalscoring numbers have suffered, but it’s translated into marginal success.

To hold the ball against Iceland, the US used a slow build-up process beginning with Jermaine Jones (who stayed surprisingly composed and centralized during his time on the field) who fed Michael Bradley and Lee Nguyen further up the pitch. That tactic may not be as effective against a less erratic opponent, but it will be interesting to see how Klinsmann decides to break down the Canadian defensive unit. The wide areas may be vital.

The 0-0 scoreline has been a fixture in this matchup, finishing goalless the last two times and in four of the last eight, so the US will no doubt be looking to break that deadlock early lest they get frustrated as time progresses.

2) USMNT full-backs vs wide play

Michael Orozco and Brad Evans were sent back to their clubs, leaving the United States incredibly thin at a position the nation has already been weak at for years. Jurgen Klinsmann has been searching far and wide for an answer to this question, and with young Kellyn Acosta slightly out of his depth or potentially star-struck in his debut against Iceland, there are a few other question marks.

The options are limited. Acosta could get another shot if Klinsmann likes what he sees in training, or he could move to the likes of Brandon Vincent or Matt Polster. The latter logged 30 matches for Chicago last year as a rookie, while Vincent was just drafted by FC Dallas and has yet to even make a professional appearance. Either way, it’s likely Canada targets the wide areas as a point of weakness for the US, so whoever plays will be in the spotlight.

[ VIDEO: Bobby Wood scores skillful goal for club ]

3) Central defenders vs Akindele and Larin

Whether Floro decides to play Larin centrally by himself, or partner him with Akindele, the striker(s) will be the main target for Canada’s attack. Larin and Akindele both have not seen the scoresheet since a 4-0 win over the Dominican Republic in World Cup qualifying last June, so they will be itching to get back on board. Should one be deployed centrally, look for the lone wolf to split the central defenders and receive service from wide areas where Canada may exploit the aforementioned weaknesses along the outside of the US back line.

How do you see the US matching up against Canada, and visa-versa?