Seattle Sounders v Real Salt Lake - Western Conference Semifinals

Dominance, media relations, and Seattle’s history with Los Angeles


Until this season, the Seattle Sounders’ history with the LA Galaxy had not been a good one. Most memorably, there’s the demoralizing Western Conference semifinal two years ago when the Galaxy scored early in Seattle (Edson Buddle 38′) and didn’t allow a goal until the 176th minute of their 3-1 win. There’s also the 5-1-2 record the Galaxy’s accumulated against Seattle from 2009 to 2011. Before the 2012 season, it looked like there was some kind of hoodoo Bruce Arena’d developed over Sigi Schmid.

That changed this season. With Seattle’s 2-0 win in early May, you could argue LA was still working through their early-season troubles. But the 4-0 drubbing the Sounders handed them in August? Though LA played makeshift back line (with David Junior Lopes and Bryan Gaul at fullback), that’s no excuse for one of the most embarrassing league results of the Arena era.

Even though LA beat Seattle in the season finale, 1-0, 2012’s results should give the Sounders plenty of confidence going into Sunday’s first leg of the Western Conference final. They shouldn’t have to do things like … resort to the clichéd sophistry of spinning media mishaps into motivation.

Alas, as we see in this Seattle Times’ report, coach Schmid is making a media department gaff into much more than it could ever possibly be:

But their opponent, the defending MLS Cup champion Los Angeles Galaxy, is doing its part to add to Seattle’s drive, starting with a faux pas by its communications department.

“L.A. thought they were playing Salt Lake,” coach Sigi Schmid said after Thursday’s playoff series win against RSL. “They put out a news release and said they were playing Salt Lake, so we hate to disappoint them. That’s motivation enough for us right now.”

Schmid often uses sarcasm and irony when addressing the press, usually to break up the monotony of the daily check-ins us content-hungry vultures demand of MLS coaches. His comments may be more playful than serious.

But let’s take them as they’re conveyed and assume Schmid either sees a slight or wants to make this into one. It’s no more than many coaches across many sports do regularly: Manipulate anything (and sometimes, everything) to try to get more out of their players.

The practice insults players’ intelligence. While I’m sure a handful of MLSers can be convinced into believing in a conspiratorial, malevolent LA communications department, it’s far more likely that this was an honest mistake – a team not doing a find and replace on a release drafted before the Thursday game started. Players are smart enough to figure this out.

What impression of players’ intelligence do you have if you’re trying to portray some evil LA P.R. managers taking matters into their own hands, giving the opposition a jibe. Or perhaps the scenario doesn’t involve such rogue behavior. Maybe the theory has the order coming Bruce Arena himself? It’s all a bit kooky.

That’s not to say there aren’t media matters that can ruffle feathers. Witness this week’s comment from Mike Magee:

“(The Sounders) have judged themselves based on their successes and failures against us,” he told “This is their MLS Cup.”

Who gives that to the media? Somebody that isn’t worried about firing up the opposition, a casual disregard that often (ironically) gets the opposition fired up.

Just another example of the subtle games people play this time of year.

VIDEO: Marco Verratti plays a brilliant pass to Eder for Italy goal

PALERMO, ITALY - SEPTEMBER 06:  Marco Verratti of Italy in action during the UEFA EURO 2016 Qualifier match between Italy and Bulgaria on September 6, 2015 in Palermo, Italy.  (Photo by Claudio Villa/Getty Images)
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Italy took a 1-0 lead over Azerbaijan through the in-form Eder in the 11th minute, but the true leg-work (see what I did there) came from bite-sized midfielder Marco Verratti.

The PSG playmaker pinged a beautiful long ball over the top of the Azerbaijan defense that fell right at the feet of Eder, who let the ball settle itself and touched home confidently past Kamran Arhayev for a 1-0 lead.

The goal is the second of Eder’s national career in just five caps, having scored on debut against Bulgaria back in March. He has six goals in seven matches for Sampdoria so far this Serie A season.

Italy needs three points in this match to ensure qualification to Euro 2016. A win would guarantee them a place in the field, while anything less would mean there is work to do in the final match on Tuesday against Norway.


Later in the match, Stephan El Shaarawy gave Italy a 2-1 lead just before halftime, his second career international goal and his first since September of 2012 which came in his third career start.

Agent: Liverpool contacted Klopp only after Rodgers firing

LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 09:  Jurgen Klopp arrives to be unveiled as the new manager of Liverpool FC at a press conference at Anfield on October 9, 2015 in Liverpool, England.  (Photo by Alex Livesey/Getty Images)
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As soon as Brendan Rodgers was dismissed by Liverpool on Sunday, Jurgen Klopp’s name was tossed around as the likely successor to the then-vacant Liverpool managerial position.

However, according to Klopp’s representatve Marc Kosicke, Liverpool did not make contact with the German until after Rodgers had been officially let go.

“The first call from Liverpool came after the dismissal as coach of Rodgers,” Kosicke told Bild. “Before Liverpool there were naturally quite a few inquiries. But Jurgen always asked me not to take it any further.”

Club management was less committal than Klopp’s rep, but did say they had their eye on the German for some time. “We have learned to keep certain matters confidential. We had a meeting recently with Jurgen that he has talked about and I don’t want to talk too much about these conversations. But we have thought about him for a long time and everyone who knows football knows he is an outstanding manager.”

It’s relatively hard to believe Liverpool would have canned Rodgers without knowing for sure that a top-level target such as Klopp or Carlo Ancelotti were on board to replace him. It also would mean discussions of the contract terms and logistics would have moved at lightning speed, with just four days between the Rodgers dismissal and Klopp’s official unveiling.