New England Revolution v Toronto FC

Burrowing even further into Benny Feilhaber’s arrival at Sporting Kansas City


On the scales of player evaluation, I keep a thumb on the area marked “locker room chemistry.”

That is to say, I might place more importance in that area than others. But I do admit that it’s a balance. One or two individuals who are more “takers” than “givers,” as Jurgen Klinsmann labeled the divergent set in a previous post, can be tolerated if the rest of the locker room has the right policing, professionalism and team-oriented guidance.

How all this relates to the Benny Feilhaber’s move west from New England to Sporting Kansas City:

Personally, I have my doubts about Feilhaber’s ability to peacefully assimilate. At this point, after more than one example of not finding a balanced place with a coach and a club, it’s on Sporting Kansas City’s newest member to show that he can get along well with others.

But if he can, and assuming SKC manager Peter Vermes finds the right kind of ball winner to play behind Feilhaber and Graham Zusi, as I said yesterday, he could make Livestrong Sporting Park an even hotter zone for opposition.’s Matthew Doyle does a good job in this piece of explaining why. Doyle makes two central points:

One, that while departing linchpin midfielder Roger Espinoza has a bigger (much bigger, perhaps) engine, what the Wigan-bound man did with the ball won’t resemble what Feilhaber does with it.

Feilhaber is a chance generator, the best pure central midfielder in the league at generating chances (and big chances) from the run of play over the course of 90 minutes. He could easily have had double-digit assists if the Revs had finished at an even below-average clip.”

Doyle referred there to a club that scored 39 goals, sixth-lowest total in MLS. Past Saer Sene’s 11 strikes, no Revolution forward had more than two. Yikes!

Doyle’s other point central point here is that Feilhaber is better in traffic than Espinoza, which is surely true. He mentions Feilhaber’s ability to move north-south with the ball; I never really thought that was an issue for SKC. Vermes’ teams pushed the ball reliably, quickly into the opposition third – although the quality of chances created will surely rise now thanks to Feilhaber’s presence.

Of course, there’s risk along with that potential reward, and that’s where Doyle finds an interesting slant on the former Revolution midfielder’s playmaking talent:

It’s a skill few US players have, both the patience to hold the ball under pressure and the technique to ride a tackle and still make a possession-positive pass. It’s gotten him into trouble before, of course, as he can be turnover prone. But SKC recover their own turnovers at a higher rate than any other MLS team, so that’s not a deal breaker.”

That is a great point. Feilhaber can give away the ball around Livestrong – so long as it happens in the right places – and know that a hard-pressing, high-pressure team around him will get it back. And probably quickly.

Sam Allardyce to open talks with Sunderland

Sam Allardyce, West Ham United FC
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Now that Liverpool have selected and named their new manager, it appears Sunderland are finally ready to move forward with their own managerial search. (That’s clearly a joke, because it implies Liverpool and Sunderland ever duke it out for the same managerial candidate.)

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s PL coverage ]

Anyway, the Black Cats will have to hire someone to replace the recently-departed Dick Advocaat at some point. We all knew that, despite the fact he’s probably earned a shot at that level, Bob Bradley was never really going to be considered for the job. With that in mind, if you’re not going to endear yourself to the entire United States of America with this hire, you might as well go for the best unemployed manager who’ll actually consider your approach.

That’s what Sunderland chairman Ellis Short appears to have done, as it was reported Thursday that despite an initial reluctance from Sam Allardyce — let’s be honest, he actually was holding out hope for the Liverpool job — the 60-year-old most recently in charge of West Ham United was willing and ready to enter into negotiations with the northeastern club.

One of the major sticking points during Sunderland’s courting of Allardyce is expected to be his demand for autonomy in the transfer market as well as a sizable transfer budget to sign his own players during the January window.

[ MORE: Advocaat: Sunderland squad too thin, chairman to blame ]

Allardyce seems like the no. 1 guy you’d like to bring in to steady a capsized ship — cough Sunderland cough — in any situation. Not only does he have a successful track record in the Premier League, but he’s the kind of no-nonsense leader a club like Sunderland so desperately needs as they find themselves in yet another relegation battle just eight games into the new season.

Short hopes to have Allardyce signed, sealed and delivered when the Premier League returns to action next weekend. In that event, Allardyce’s first game in charge of Sunderland would be a trip to West Bromwich Albion. His first home fixture? Home to Tyne-Wear derby rivals Newcastle United, a club whose boisterous fanbase still holds a great deal of disdain for Big Sam. Sometimes the football gods really are looking out for us.

Statement from suspended UEFA president Michel Platini

Michel Platini, UEFA & FIFA
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Statement from suspended UEFA President Michel Platini:

Early this afternoon, I was informed of the FIFA ethics committee’s decision to impose on me a provisional 90-day suspension with immediate effect. That decision, which I will of course contest in the appropriate manner at the appropriate time, had already been the subject of a deliberate leak, and I gave my opinion on that earlier in the day.

I reject all of the allegations that have been made against me, which are based on mere semblances and are astonishingly vague. Indeed, the wording of those allegations merely states that a breach of the FIFA Code of Ethics “seems to have been committed” and that a decision on the substance of the matter cannot be taken immediately.

Despite the farcical nature of these events, I refuse to believe that this is a political decision taken in haste in order to taint a lifelong devotee of the game or crush my candidacy for the FIFA presidency.

I want everyone to know my state of mind: more than a sense of injustice or a desire for revenge, I am driven by a profound feeling of staunch defiance. I am more determined than ever to defend myself before the relevant judicial bodies.

I want to reiterate in the strongest possible terms that I will devote myself to ensuring that my good faith prevails. I have received numerous messages of support today from UEFA’s member associations and the other confederations encouraging me to continue my work serving football’s interests. Nothing will make me give up on that commitment.