Tom Sermanni

Looking at the lesser known USWNT’ers called into Tom Sermanni’s first camp


Yesterday’s news was supposed to be about Tom Sermanni’s first callups, but when the U.S. Women’s National Team selections were announced mid-day, Tobin Heath’s move to Paris Saint-Germain swiped the headlines. Beyond that blockbuster, there are a number of subtle story lines within Sermanni selection, plots woven from the predictability that defined Pia Sundhage’s approach.

There was never any drama with the U.S.’s previous coach. Renown for her loyalty, Sundhage’s selections were so predictable that they’d be overlooked. Perhaps one or two new names would dot each team, but there’d rarely be any surprises. Even as Alex Morgan and Sydney Leroux were assimilated into the team, the methodical nature of the process drained the intrigue. There was never an Eddie Johnson, where did this come from Jurgen moment. Every Sundhage callup was always (looking at the list) “Uh-huh, uh-huh, uh-huh … Yep.”

Not that a coach should try to create drama. On the contrary, many see Sundhage’s reluctance to rock the boat as a key to the team’s recent success; however, that reluctance meant a number of good players may not have gotten chances other coaches would have provided.

Sermanni’s first team features a few of those names, though those inclusions are mostly because of the size of the call-in. To bring 29 players in for a look, you have to pick a few new faces.

Let’s go ahead and count down the surprises from 10-to-1 in terms of … let’s call it “intrigue.” We start with someone who’s no surprise at all (but deserves a mention):

10. Ali Krieger, D, Washington Spirit – Krieger is not a new name (she’s one of the best right backs in the world), but this is her first camp since tearing up her knee in Olympic qualifying. A strong following of devoted fans will be happy to see the former Frankfurt star back in action. She’s an obvious pick as Sermanni’s starting right back.

9. Whitney Engen, D, Liverpool – Engen’s signing in Liverpool earned some press, and despite the creation of the new NWSL, the former North Carolina standout plans to stay in England. She was one of the victims of Sundhage’s predictability. Despite strong play at both collegiate and WPS levels, Engen rarely got a look under the previous coach.

8. Ashlyn Harris, G, Duisburg/Washington Spirit – Harris has never been capped but has the talent to be a regular in the team. Under a new regime, players like Harris may be able to win coveted spots, like the place behind Hope Solo. She’ll join the Spirit once her German commitments end, with player and agent hoping to negotiate and early departure (her contract runs through May).

7. Kristie Mewis, M, FC Kansas City – The number three pick in last Friday’s College Draft, the former Boston College star represents a possibility for a thinning midfield. Not yet 22, Mewis can also slide farther up the field to play as an outright forward.

6. Crystal Dunn, D, North Carolina – The MAC Herman Trophy winner helped the Tar Heels reclaim their national title. Still 20 years old, Dunn has played in the middle at U-levels but projects as a wide option for the senior team.

5. Julie Johnston, D, Santa Clara – Like Dunn, a collegiate star who Sermanni will get a chance to evaluate in person. Johnston is also a potential solution for the once-precarious fullback situation.

4. Jane Campbell, G, Concorde Fire South – The high school senior is the biggest surprise on the team, passing over a number overseas and NWSL names that justified this selection. This could be Sermanni just wanting a first-hand look at a prominent prospect, but Campbell could have also gone to the concurrent U-20 camp. Players like Turbine Potsdam’s Alyssa Naeher or Western New York Adrianna Franch should have gotten this spot.

3. Yael Averbuch, D, Göteberg (Sweden) – Averbuch was not only hurt by Sundhage’s loyalty to the regular squad members but left out by system that didn’t use a real defensive midfielder. One of a handful of national team hopefuls who passed on the NWSL, Averbuch’s club performances hint she’s reaching the peak of her career.

2. Keelin Winters, M, Chicago Red Stars – Winters recent success at Turbine Potsdam makes her a key part of the new Chicago team. Capable of playing a defensive midfield as well as a box-to-box role, Winters has the versatility to be a good bench option for the national team.

1. Christen Press, F, Tyresö FF (Sweden) – Perhaps the most exciting callup, Press is a former MAC Herman Trophy winner spent last season in Sweden, where she elected to stay rather than joining the NWSL. He 17 goals in last year’s Damallsvensken were second only to German star Anja Mittag’s 21. With a slew of talents in front of her at forward, it will be difficult to crack the squad for a real game. But at least now Press is getting the chance.

Here’s Sermanni’s full call-in, courtesy of U.S. Soccer:

U.S. Women’s National Team Training Camp Roster by Position

GOALKEEPERS (5): Nicole Barnhart (FC Kansas City), Jane Campbell (Concorde Fire South), Ashlyn Harris (Washington Spirit), Jill Loyden (Sky Blue FC), Hope Solo (Seattle Reign FC)

DEFENDERS (9): Rachel Buehler (Portland Thorns FC), Crystal Dunn (North Carolina), Whitney Engen (Liverpool FC), Julie Johnston (Santa Clara), Ali Krieger (Washington Spirit), Heather Mitts (Boston Breakers), Kelley O’Hara (Sky Blue FC), Christie Rampone (Sky Blue FC), Becky Sauerbrunn (FC Kansas City)

MIDFIELDERS (10): Yael Averbuch (Göteborg FC), Shannon Boxx (Chicago Red Stars), Lauren Cheney (FC Kansas City), Tobin Heath (Paris Saint-Germain), Lori Lindsey (Washington Spirit), Carli Lloyd (Western NY Flash), Kristie Mewis (FC Kansas City), Heather O’Reilly (Boston Breakers), Megan Rapinoe (Lyon), Keelin Winters (Chicago Red Stars)

FORWARDS (5): Sydney Leroux (Boston Breakers), Alex Morgan (Portland Thorns FC), Christen Press (Tyresö FF), Amy Rodriguez (Seattle Reign FC), Abby Wambach (Western NY Flash)

MLS Snapshot: Orlando City SC 2-1 Montreal Impact

Cyle Larin, Orlando City SC

The game in 100 words (or less): For weeks, it was a widely held belief that the Montreal Impact would snatch up the sixth and final playoff place in the Eastern Conference with little or no resistance from their opposition. As they went six games unbeaten (four wins), all looked to be setting up perfect for the club that fired Frank Klopas midseason, but there was another team in the race for sixth that kept winning themselves: Orlando City SC. On Saturday night, Montreal and Orlando City faced off at the Citrus, with the expansion Lions claiming their fourth-straight victory with a 2-1 triumph. Montreal now holds a one-point lead on Orlando in the race for sixth, and have two games in hand, but it’s no longer a foregone conclusion L’Impact will qualify for the playoffs no resistance whatsoever.

[ MORE: | Week 30 TOTW | POTW ]

Three moments that mattered

33′ — Bush’s mistake gifts Larin the opening goal — Larin did what your taught to do as a striker — “put it on frame, test the goalkeeper” — but in no universe does a shot so feeble have any business finding the back of the net. Evan Bush has been great this year. Hopefully (for Montreal’s sake), this howler doesn’t turn into the yips with the playoffs looming.

43′ — Hall’s “mistake” gifts Oduro an equalizer — Dominic Oduro equalized in the 43rd minute, when he took the ball out of the hands of Tally Hall and smashed it into the back of the net, but the goal should have been disallowed due to Hall having full control of the ball.

80′ — Hines hits the winner for Orlando — Seb Hines put the ball back into the mixer and just so happened to find the back of the net in the 80th minute. Sometimes that’s all it takes.

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Man of the match: Seb Hines

Goalscorers: Larin (33′), Oduro (43′), Hines (80′)

MLS Snapshot: NY Red Bulls 2-1 Columbus Crew SC

Bradley Wright-Phillips, New York Red Bulls
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The game in 100 words (or less): Two weeks in a row Columbus Crew SC have had a chance to go top of the Eastern Conference with a victory, and two weeks in a row Crew SC have failed to take a single point from massively important fixtures. Their latest defeat, a 2-1 humbling at the hands of the East-leading New York Red Bulls, started so well for Gregg Berhalter’s side, but was undone by a pair of costly, comedic defensive errors that allowed Lloyd Sam and Bradley Wright-Phillips (15th of the season) to erase an early deficit (Justin Meram) and win all three points. The result not only keeps the Red Bulls top of the East, but gives them a three- and four-point cushion with three and two games in hand on their nearest competitors., D.C. United and New England Revoltion respectively. For Crew SC, they’re four points back of the Red Bulls in fourth place, one point ahead of fifth-place Toronto FC, who have a game in hand.

[ MORE: | Week 30 TOTW | POTW ]

Three moments that mattered

9′ — Meram pokes it past Robles for an early lead — Meram “earned” his goal all the way back in midfield, when the Iraqi international’s mazy run took a routine turnover inside Crew SC’s defensive half and turned it into a dangerous counter-attacking opportunity. Harrison Afful overlapped and provided the cross for Meram to send home.

12′ — Sam capitalizes on multiple mistakes to equalize — Crew SC pass the ball out of the back. They don’t boot it forward to clear. It’s just what they do. Sometimes, that’ll bite you. When your goalkeeper and right back both have blunders clearing the ball 10 seconds apart, you probably deserve to concede an ugly, scrappy goal.

21′ — Wright-Phillips capitalizes on more defensive gaffes — See the above description for Red Bulls goal no. 1.

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Man of the match: Damien Perrinelle

Goalscorers: Meram (9′), Sam (12′), Wright-Phillips (21′)