Eden Hazard apologizes, but a suspension is surely ahead

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Remember when athletes got in trouble for the usual tomfoolery and jackassery? You know, tawdry affairs, juicing, public intox, firearms violations and such.

Oh, there was the odd flying kung fu kick delivered here and there to the unsuspecting punk in the crowd. (Right, Eric Cantona? You showed that Selhurst Park meanie a thing or two, eh?)

Thing is, we came to understand how to deal with this stuff, what level of mea culpa was required and what punitive measure to mete out for restoration of public grace. Only now, it seems a whole new class of indiscretion has arrived.

I mean, frauds conducted on a global scale over a decade or more, wildly implausible fake girlfriend scandals, and now this: kicking ball boys in the stomach, for Pete’s sake!

What were you thinking, Eden Hazard?

(MORE: Yes, Eden Hazard really did that)

So now the public must build a whole new set of guidelines and best practices, it seems, for dealing with hyper-disgraced athletes.

Personally, I don’t know what it might take to reclaim public trust after Wednesday’s outrageous incident, but I believe it’s going to take more than this: the Chelsea attacker, who was enjoying such a wonderful season at Stamford Bridge prior to Wednesday’s mad moment, has issued an apology:

The boy put his whole body onto the ball and I was just trying to kick the ball and I think I kicked the ball and not the boy. I apologize,”

“The ball boy came in the changing room and we had a quick chat and I apologized and the boy apologized as well, and it is over. Sorry.”

Isn’t that cute that he believes “it’s over?”

MORE: Re-telling the Eden Hazard-ball boy incident

There will be fallout over this one, and quite possibly a suspension. Perhaps even a lengthy one, as this headline today out of England suggests.

Report: USMNT’s Arriola drawing transfer interest abroad, in MLS

AP Photo/LM Otero
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Paul Arriola’s motor was constantly running as the United States men’s national team claimed its sixth Gold Cup title, and it could drive him all the way from Club Tijuana to Europe or a prime spot on an MLS roster.

There’s a snag, though.

[ MORE: Everton wins Europa opener ]

Arriola is reportedly wanted by Real Salt Lake and clubs in both the Netherlands and Portugal, but the LA Galaxy has what Goal.com describes a “dubious homegrown player” claim on Arriola, who participated in a minimal of practices with the Galaxy when he was younger.

As you’ll see below, there isn’t much “homegrown” about it and, to its critics, it is peak MLS monopolized tomfoolery. Here’s how Goal describes it:

“He was already a U.S. youth national team player when he traveled the 120 miles from Chula Vista to take part in a handful of training sessions with the LA Galaxy academy and eventually the Galaxy first team.

“The Galaxy are believed to hold a homegrown player claim on Arriola, and would have the right of first refusal on making Arriola an offer if he comes to MLS. The Galaxy’s current salary-cap situation might not allow them to make a serious bid for Arriola.”

But… here’s how the Galaxy described his choosing to sign for TJ instead of a pro deal from LA in 2013:

“It’s a little disappointing,” Galaxy technical director Jovan Kirovski told MLSsoccer.com by phone on Friday. “He went through our system, we offered him a contract and he decided to move on and go somewhere else. But that’s going to happen. It’s something that has happened before, and it’s something that will happen again.”

Arriola’s response in the same article? “I thank the Galaxy for giving me a wonderful opportunity to train with their first team and be a part of their first team which really taught me a lot.” That doesn’t read as much like he “went through their system.” He played in at least one U-18 game, debuting in October 2012, did more training with TJ in December 2012, and signed for the Mexican side in May 2013.

Should that qualify him as Homegrown?

https://www.transfermarkt.com/paul-arriola/leistungsdaten/spieler/189876

Did Arriola spent significant time with LA, or is it possible the Galaxy might reap rewards from having an already established youth national teamer to practice when he was a kid? Whether you’re okay with that or not, consider that it encourages clubs to pilfer rights without actually registering or training the player.

Not to mention there is no guarantee that playing in the Netherlands or Portugal will be better for his development than MLS. Benfica or Ajax and potential action in European tournaments? Maybe. NAC Breda or Tondela? Maybe not.

Nevermind the quagmire that is American youth soccer clubs’ not earning money from transfer fees, the Arriola drama seems baseless. We don’t know the Galaxy will hold the player hostage, but they would actually be depriving MLS of a talent, as LA would theoretically get nothing should TJ sell him to a European club.

In any event, check out Arriola’s use chart from Tijuana and you’ll see why he’s valued by Bruce Arena as well as his suitors. He’s a Swiss Army Knife. Here’s hoping Tinseltown doesn’t stop him from a proper next step (assuming he’s ready to leave Liga MX).