Seattle Sounders v Portland Timbers

Would Mix Diskerud have been worth a Designated Player slot? Merritt Paulson has thoughts


This isn’t going to come as a shock to anybody who follows me on Twitter, but I’m a big fan of Portland owner Merritt Paulson. Or better put, I’m a big fan of the way he goes about his business (I don’t know the guy personally). Via his always active Twitter account, he’s constantly connected to the Portland faithful, and his honest (sometimes brutally honest) way of interacting with followers provides a refreshing alternative to the sterile no-speak communications departments are hired to churn out.

Organizations are always talking about how to keep The Conversation going (as if “The Conversation” was a lead in to The Closer that TNT was trying to bleed another season out of), but you don’t do that through sunshine and happiness press releases. You do it by being up front and honest, an approach so rare its elicits a mild, unspoken shock from the fan base. That’s why Paulson’s social media presence polarizes, dividing people between those that get it and those nostalgic for fax machines and teletype. it’s not exactly something out of MLS 1.0’s instruction manual.

The Best Soccer Show podcast caught some of Paulson’s brutal honesty yesterday, their ranging interview covering three topics I found particularly interesting:

1. U.S. Soccer will not be playing a Hex match at Jeld-Wen – We suspected it. Paulson confirmed it. Portland has taken a stand on laying temporary sod on top of their FieldTurf surface. U.S. Soccer has taken a stand on giving them a qualifier. CONCACAF may not have a problem with it. USSF does.

I think it’s ridiculous, but I’ve covered that ground before. Lumping all turf fields together is like lumping all natural surfaces together. As Paulson concedes in the interview, grass would be preferable, but is that enough to take Jeld-Wen off the list entirely? As Dan Gargan implied, perhaps it is, but when turf antagonists Thierry Henry and David Beckham have no problem with Portland (as Paulson details in the interview), maybe others should re-think their stances, too?

2. Cascadia Cup controversy – Paulson didn’t comment on it directly. He said he’d been asked not to, but he did predict the lingering dispute between Major League Soccer and Pacific Northwest supporters groups will be resolved amicably. Breaking out my Official Read Between the MLS Lines Handbook, it sounds like the league is committed to working with, not stonewalling, supporters.

3. Timbers, league weren’t sold on Diskerud as a Designated Player – This was by far the most interesting tidbit from the interview. When asked why Portland’s negotiations with U.S. international Mix Diskerud broke down, Paulson said the deal that fell apart at the last-minute wasn’t completed because Diskerud would have had to be made a Designated Player.

That shouldn’t be a surprise given Diskerud’s earning potential in Europe. What’s surprising is Portland seemed to be close to getting the 22-year-old on a non-Designated Player deal. However, when the price went into the special compensation range, not only did Portland and the Major League Soccer home office have problems with the pact, it forced the Timbers to choose: Diskerud or Diego Valeri? And we know how they chose.

I’m not sure I would have made the same choice. Let’s take it as a given Valeri’s a better player. Portland knows more about that comparison than we do, and we should take their word on it until well after March 2. There is still a certain caché to being the first to lure a young American back from Europe. I wouldn’t have been able to resist.

Again reading between the lines, it sounds like Diskerud was interested in playing for Caleb Porter, was willing to leave some of his European money on the table, but ultimately he wasn’t willing to make the kind of concessions necessary to fit into Portland’s plans.

It’s an understandable decision on both parts. Diskerud pursued an option that didn’t quite pan out, while Portland wasn’t ready to draw up a new game plan. But from the point of view from a soccer-loving Statesider, it’s hard not to feel like something slipped through our fingers.

Here’s the whole interview:

Report: David Silva out 2-3 weeks with ligament damage

LOGRONO, SPAIN - OCTOBER 09:  David Silva of Spain is fouled by Lars Gerson of Luxembourg during the UEFA EURO 2016 Qualifier group C match between Spain and Luxembourg at Estadio Municipal Las Gaunas on October 9, 2015 in Logrono, Spain.  (Photo by Denis Doyle/Getty Images)
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Despite sitting at the top of the table in the Premier League, things are not going well for Manchester City.

Star striker and leading goalscorer Sergio Aguero suffered a torn hamstring while playing for Argentina, and now he is joined by David Silva on the injured list.

Silva lasted nine minutes in Spain’s EURO qualifying match against Luxembourg, forced off after taking a bad challenge from behind. Silva went down in pain and tried to play on, but asked for a substitution just minutes later.

[ RELATED: Alejandro Bedoya to miss USMNT vs. Mexico ]

Spanish news outlet AS is reporting that Silva has suffered “lateral internal ligament damage in his right ankle,” and could face 2-3 weeks on the sidelines.

With Aguero set to miss at least a month, Silva’s injury could leave Manchester City without two of their top players in the coming weeks.

Silva has arguably been the best player in the Premier League this season, the quarterback of the City attack, which has scored a league-leading 19 goals through eight matches.

City travels to Old Trafford for the Manchester derby on October 25, which falls into that 2-3 week range for Silva’s recovery. In a match that could decide who sits top of the table, Manuel Pellegrini would be very shorthanded without Silva and Aguero.

Alejandro Bedoya to miss USMNT vs. Mexico

GLASGOW,  SCOTLAND - NOVEMBER 15 :  Alejandro Bedoya of USA  in action during the International Friendly match between Scotland and USA at Hampden Park on November 15, 2013.  (Photo by Mark Runnacles/Getty Images)
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Alejandro Bedoya will not feature for the United States in the CONCACAF playoff against Mexico on Saturday, and has been replaced on the roster by Bobby Wood.

Bedoya traveled to Los Angeles from his club team Nantes in France, but Jurgen Klinsmann has announced he will be unable to play after falling ill.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s USMNT coverage ]

Without Bedoya, Union Berlin midfielder Bobby Wood has been added to the USMNT side. Wood scored the first two goals of his international career this summer in wins over the Netherlands and Germany, and has scored four goals in ten matches for Union Berlin this season. Wood has been training with the U.S. camp throughout the week for the upcoming friendly against Costa Rica.

Bedoya has played well for the USMNT, discounting his short performance against Brazil in September. In that match, Klinsmann played Bedoya out of position against a potent Brazil attack, and he was substituted before halftime. However, playing in his more natural role as a winger or attacking midfielder, many believed Bedoya could be in line for a start against Mexico.