Head coach of the U.S. national soccer team Klinsmann of Germany looks at his players during a practice session at the Azteca stadium in Mexico City

Klinsmann’s late announcement: You are not entitled to anything (but controversy)


Earlier this week, Honduras named their team that will face the U.S. Wednesday in the opening match of CONCACAF’s final round of World Cup Qualifying. In contrast, Jurgen Klinsmann will wait until Monday to name his, taking the weekend to see if any injuries force changes to the team he’s likely to recall.

That’s important to note. People have expressed concerns about Klinsmann failing to make his team public, but he’s already been in touch with the players and their teams. He’s had to. National teams have to notify clubs well in advance in order to obtain a player’s release for an international break. Those players have to be “reserved.” You may not know who Klinsmann’s taking to Honduras, and I may not know, but everybody who needs the information has been kept in the loop. If there’s a possibility you’re getting called in, you probably already know.

This morning the Washington Post’s Steven Goff gave his feelings on the controversy. Under a headline calling Klinsmann’s decision puzzling, Goff notes U.S. coaches have a history of similar shenanigans while claiming a more open policy “fuels healthy debate about who should play and what combinations would be most effective” while quelling undo speculation:

Waiting to go public also feeds the rumor machine (aka Twitter):

“My cousin’s ex says Boyd boarding flight in Frankfurt!”

“Just saw Beasley on SoBe. Well, looked like him”

“Deuce tweetin about eatin fish n chips. Shouldn’t he be in Honduras by now??? WTF”

There’s no competitive disadvantage in “a roster announcement, revealing between 22 and 25 players,” Goff says, while Honduras already “have a pretty good idea who is traveling.” Withholding the roster until the last-minute creates uncertainty where there’s no need for doubt. It also “puts the players in a difficult position” of having to hold their tongues.

I have trouble buying any of these arguments.

  • In the past, roster announcements have usually led to one day of debate (interest-building) before people settle into interest stories and preview analysis. That will happen on Monday.
  • The speculation that Goff sites in his piece are all Twitter hypotheticals that would happen regardless of when the roster was announced. If U.S. Soccer said it’d release a list on Friday, Thursday would see people speculating whether Sacha Kljestan’s getting called in.
  • And players always have to withhold information. Klinsmann’s decision to delay just extends that period for a few meaningless days.

And as Goff says, Honduras basically knows who’s most likely to travel. So do we. If withholding the names of the players does little to keep the information from the Catrachos, why are we in the dark? If anything, our proximity to the situation should allow us greater knowledge of the probable roster. Why are we complaining about the secrecy of a list when most of the names are no secret at all?

The only drawback to holding the roster back is risking the scorn of writers and fans, yet it’s unclear why media and supporters feel entitled to this information. As Goff notes, this is not a new situation. Bruce Arena and Bob Bradley were also slow to make their selections public. Isn’t this something we should be used to?

There are, however, a couple of possible benefits. Klinsmann gets more time to decide which of the players he’s “reserved” for possible travel will actually go to Honduras. He avoids the potential scrutiny of selecting a player only not to take him, thereby causing a small amount of public embarrassment to the player. And there’s the original reasoning: Wanting to wait to see how people come through the weekend before naming his traveling squad.

There’s nothing wrong with the way Honduras has done it — name your team early — but is there anything wrong with how Klinsmann’s gone about his business? Only if you feel entitled to information you were never guaranteed in the first place. At what point did we, as a soccer culture, feel we deserved this information? Because as Goff notes, it hadn’t always been available in the past.

I can’t help but think we’re becoming caricatures of ourselves. We’re always finding new things to fuss about. Our anguish must always be palpable. The difference between getting and not getting a preliminary roster has no effect on the game, how we perceive it, or the debate that precedes the match, but if there is an alternate universe in which we could have this information, then why aren’t we on that timeline? Why can’t we deal with the realities of that world instead of the possibilities of our own?

Klinsmann isn’t making life easier for journalists easier, but that isn’t his job. Nor is it his job to subvert what he thinks is best in order to appease hardcore fans. While some may see this as Klinsmann coming “across, fairly or unfairly, as paranoid, dark — and maybe a little nervous,” as Goff puts it, it’s more likely this is just a guy doing what he thinks is best.

If Klinsmann is paranoid or nervous, that’d be a first. We might want to consider other possibilities. We may want to see consider whether any of this really matters.

We’ll get the names soon enough, and we’ll have plenty of time to drive every debate into the ground. No dead horse will be left unbeaten. If we have to put off the ceremonial hand-wringing and second-guessing for a day, so be it. It doesn’t hurt anything but our sense of entitlement.

“Overweight” Costa comes to Mourinho’s defense

Diego Costa, Chelsea FC
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Diego Costa says he and his Chelsea teammates are to blame for Chelsea’s horrid start to the 2015-16 Premier League season.

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Speaking Thursday, during a bit of downtime over the current international break (Costa was left out of Vicente del Bosque’s squad for Spain’s final two EURO 2016 qualifiers this week), Costa placed the majority of blame at the feet of the entire team, but went on to most harshly critique himself for coming into the season unfocused and “overweight.”

Costa, on his lack of fitness and form to begin the season — quotes from the Guardian:

“We know we’re not in the form we were supposed to be at the beginning of the season. We need to blame the players because we came back from holiday very confident, thinking we could go back into how it was last season, and then realized the team was already in a bad situation.

“I’m going to be very honest: maybe a few weeks ago, five or six weeks ago, I was not on top of my game. At least physically. We talk within the players and we know that, maybe at the beginning, we were not 100 percent as we were supposed to be when we got here. I got injured at the end of last season and then I went on holiday. Maybe I got out of my diet and, when I came back, I was not the way I was supposed to be. I was a little bit overweight. That affected my game. You can be selfish and blame it on the manager but I’m not going to do that. I’m responsible 100%, and so are the other guys.

Given that Chelsea manager Jose Mourinho said on Thursday he doesn’t quite know what’s wrong with the defending Premier League champions, hearing someone — anyone — speak up and explain the club’s worst start to a season in 37 years will surely be a welcome sound to any Blues supporter’s ears.

[ MORE: Liverpool appoint Klopp as manager | Allardyce to Sunderland? ]

Costa, who is eligible to return from suspension next weekend when Aston Villa visit Stamford Bridge, has scored just one goal in league play this season (six appearances) after scoring 20 in 26 games last season.

Sam Allardyce to open talks with Sunderland

Sam Allardyce, West Ham United FC
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Now that Liverpool have selected and named their new manager, it appears Sunderland are finally ready to move forward with their own managerial search. (That’s clearly a joke, because it implies Liverpool and Sunderland ever duke it out for the same managerial candidate.)

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Anyway, the Black Cats will have to hire someone to replace the recently-departed Dick Advocaat at some point. We all knew that, despite the fact he’s probably earned a shot at that level, Bob Bradley was never really going to be considered for the job. With that in mind, if you’re not going to endear yourself to the entire United States of America with this hire, you might as well go for the best unemployed manager who’ll actually consider your approach.

That’s what Sunderland chairman Ellis Short appears to have done, as it was reported Thursday that despite an initial reluctance from Sam Allardyce — let’s be honest, he actually was holding out hope for the Liverpool job — the 60-year-old most recently in charge of West Ham United was willing and ready to enter into negotiations with the northeastern club.

One of the major sticking points during Sunderland’s courting of Allardyce is expected to be his demand for autonomy in the transfer market as well as a sizable transfer budget to sign his own players during the January window.

[ MORE: Advocaat: Sunderland squad too thin, chairman to blame ]

Allardyce seems like the no. 1 guy you’d like to bring in to steady a capsized ship — cough Sunderland cough — in any situation. Not only does he have a successful track record in the Premier League, but he’s the kind of no-nonsense leader a club like Sunderland so desperately needs as they find themselves in yet another relegation battle just eight games into the new season.

Short hopes to have Allardyce signed, sealed and delivered when the Premier League returns to action next weekend. In that event, Allardyce’s first game in charge of Sunderland would be a trip to West Bromwich Albion. His first home fixture? Home to Tyne-Wear derby rivals Newcastle United, a club whose boisterous fanbase still holds a great deal of disdain for Big Sam. Sometimes the football gods really are looking out for us.