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Six-round supplemental draft rounds out NWSL rosters


“Will they even play?” That’s the question onlookers were left asking as the final picks were announced. By then, over an hours’ worth of NWSL Supplemental Draft picks left teams throwing darts and launching Hail Marys, hoping long shot selections of prominent question marks will come good.

It was a draft designed to fill out rosters. Teams already had three-fourths of their squad in place. Today’s day’s six round draft was just supposed to fill out. It’ss understandable a few teams chose to swing for the fences with their last roster spots.

Take the selection of Tasha Kai. She’s a former U.S. Women’s National Team regular, was a starter for three seasons in Women’s Professional Soccer, and was a vital cog on the Philadelphia Independence team that make the 2011 WPS final.

But it’s also unclear whether she’s a soccer player any longer. For over a year, Kai has been devoting herself to rugby, where he has excelled. Strong, fast, and with a mentality that left few surprised the former striker gravitated toward the sport, Kai was part of the U.S. team that competed at the first IRB rugby sevens Challenge Cup in December 2011.

The Washington Freedom selected Kai 25th overall in today’s draft, the most notable of a series of curious selections that started in the first round. There, with the second pick, the Seattle Reign took former University of Virginia defender Nikki Kryzysik, a former WPS Best XI player who is unsure she’ll play in 2013. With the final pick of the round, the Portland Thorns selected Tina Ellertson three days after the veteran defender said she would be taking the year off for family reasons. There were also questions about goalkeeper Val Henderson (31st overall, Western New York), Casey Loyd (30th, Kansas City), and Marian Dalmy (32nd). Kaley Fountain (42nd, Seattle) and Tina DiMartino (38th, Kansas City) don’t intend to play at all.

But don’t mistake confusion for knowledge, and don’t assume tweets reflect certainty. After speaking with Thorns FC head coach Cindy Parlow Cone, Portland has good reason to believe Ellertson and Dalmy would eventually suit up for the team. Each is a locally-based player, something that would alleviate Ellertson’s family concerns, and while a pick in a draft doesn’t guarantee players will show up for training in March, the club had been in contract with both players before the draft. Similar stories could be driving the rest of Thursday’s curious selections.

With the exception of Krzysik and Ellertson, all those picks came after the fourth round, the point at which teams seemed to decide it was better to roll the dice on maybes than secure the roster’s last spots. Kai would be a rare, proven goal-scorer, Ellertson’s a starting-caliber central defender, while Henderson was a WPS starter. Noguiera has near-Tobin Heath-level skills, and Dalmy’s a former U.S. national team defender. They’re probably worth the risk.

The selections provided a quick and dirty synopsis of the day’s events. Before the fourth round, teams were adding players that fell through free agency – talents they probably see getting meaningful playing time as the 22-game season unfolds. With 18th, 19th, 20th spots on their rosters, teams were more willing to embrace low risk, high reward selections, even if that means Discovery and tryout players may eventually full their rosters’ final spots.

Expect more news on player availability over the next few days. The doubts listed, above? Those are just the ones we know about now. As we approach March’s preseason camps, we’ll have a better idea which picks were sure things and which were complete flyers.

More discussion points from today’s draft:

How did they last this long?

It was surprising that Stephanie Ochs, the first player selected on Thursday, even lasted through free agency. She was the third pick in last year’s WPS draft, a known commodity from the University of San Diego, and stayed on radars by appearing for the U.S. U-23s last year. But after a process that saw a number of players return to clubs with whom they had previous connections, the 23-year-old who never appeared in WPS was still a free agent. With the first pick, the Washington Spirit reaped the rewards.

Jordan Angeli’s another curious case, though the Santa Clara alum is still recovering from knee surgery. The forward/defender scored eight goals during her three WPS seasons in Boston but still fell to the third round. Two-time WPS champion Kandace Wilson went to Sky Blue FC with the 38th pick, while former WPS All-Star Allison Falk lasted until the sixth round (also, Sky Blue). If they play, they’re steals.

But that’s an important caveat: If they play. Given how many players we already see bowing out, all we really know is a one team has claimed their rights. Getting them to suit up is another deal entirely.

Is Lindsay Tarpley coming back?

It was one of the heartbreaking stories in the buildup to the World Cup. Veteran attacker Lindsay Tarpley, a likely selection for Germany 2011, blew out her knee in the build-up to the tournament. The two-time gold medalist hasn’t played since.

Today, Chicago — the team with whom Tarpley began in WPS — selected the former U.S. international with the fourth pick, a huge hint the 29-year-old is ready to come back. Should she return to some semblance of her former self, Rory Dames has picked up a potentially valuable cog for an attack that looked thin coming out of allocation.

Where’s the (international) flavor?

Teams are allowed up to two international players, but only a few of those slots have been filled. Depending on whether today’s draftees get classified as domestic or international players (determined by green card and citizenship status), only seven of the league’s 16 international slots may currently be filled.

Obviously this is an issue that goes beyond one Supplemental Draft, but it still prompts a question of quality. Combined with some european exiles (Megan Rapinoe, Tobin Heath), players who passed on the league to stay abroad (Christen Press, Yael Averbuch), and the dependence on low-paid college players to fill out squads, the lack of international players portends to a step back from WPS’s talent.

But that step back in talent doesn’t necessarily mean the quality won’t be there. Despite its spending, WPS turned out to be a goal-starved environment in its first season, something the league strived to resolve in subsequent seasons. Eventually, we saw the game open up, with goal-scoring up 32 percent by the time WPS shut its doors.

Even if the quality of play is down from WPS, it would be for understandable reasons. Cost-control is a much bigger priority for the NWSL than it was for WPS or its predecessor, Women’s United Soccer Association. In an effort to build a more sustainable league, less money’s being spent on talent.

That means players like Marta, Camile Abily, and 2011 MVP Veronica Boquete are staying abroad, but it also means the league stands a better chance of being around to lure the next generation of talent. In the short-term, that means concluding a Supplemental Draft with most of the league’s international slots yet unfilled.

Supplemental Draft Results

First Round:
1. Stephanie Ochs (Washington Spirit)
2. Nikki Krzysik (Seattle Reign FC)
3. Joanna Lohman (Boston Breakers)
4. Lindsay Tarpley (Chicago Red Stars)
5. Katy Frierson (Sky Blue FC)
6. Courtney Jones (FC Kansas City)
7. Estelle Johnson (Western New York Flash)
8. Tina Ellertson (Portland Thorns FC)

Second Round:
9. Tori Huster (Washington Spirit)
10. Lauren Barnes (Seattle Reign FC)
11. Katie Schoepfer (Boston Breakers)
12. Lauren Fowlkes (Chicago Red Stars)
13. Brittany Cameron (Sky Blue FC)
14. Bianca Henninger (FC Kansas City)
15. Angela Salem (Western New York Flash)
16. Angie Kerr (Portland Thorns FC)

Third Round:
17. Jordan Angeli (Washington Spirit)
18. Laura Heyboer (Seattle Reign FC)
19. Bianca D’Agostino (Boston Breakers)
20. Michelle Wenino (Chicago Red Stars)
21. Coco Goodson (Sky Blue FC)
22. Merritt Mathias (FC Kansas City)
23. Kim Yokers (Western New York Flash)
24. Michele Weissenhofer (Portland Thorns FC)

Fourth Round:
25. Natasha Kai (Washington Spirit)
26. Liz Bogus (Seattle Reign FC)
27. Jasmyne Spencer (Boston Breakers)
28. Jackie Santacaterina (Chicago Red Stars)
29. Meghan Lenczyk (Sky Blue FC)
30. Casey Nogueira (FC Kansas City)
31. Val Henderson (Western New York Flash)
32. Marian Dalmy (Portland Thorns FC)

Fifth Round:
33. Megan Mischler (Washington Spirit)
34. Michelle Betos (Seattle Reign FC)
35. Lauren Alkek (Boston Breakers)
36. Alyssa Mautz (Chicago Red Stars)
37. Kandace Wilson (Sky Blue FC)
38. Christina DiMartino (FC Kansas City)
39. Ashley Grove (Western New York Flash)
40. Jessica Shufelt (Portland Thorns FC)

Sixth Round:
41. Heather Cooke (Washington Spirit)
42. Kaley Fountain (Seattle Reign FC)
43. Jessica Luscinski (Boston Breakers)
44. Pass – Chicago Red Stars
45. Allison Falk (Sky Blue FC)
46. Casey Berrier (FC Kansas City)
47. Pass – Western New York Flash
48. Pass – Portland Thorns FC

Klopp’s blockbuster arrival brings hope back to Liverpool

LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 09:  Jurgen Klopp is unveiled as the new manager of Liverpool FC during a press conference at Anfield on October 9, 2015 in Liverpool, England.  (Photo by Alex Livesey/Getty Images)
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LIVERPOOL – Jurgen Klopp is box office in every sense of the word.

His relaxed demeanor makes him likable, yet he also exudes self-confidence, something he will need a lot of in the coming weeks and months as he tries to get Liverpool’s players to believe in his methodology and drag the illustrious club back to the top of the Premier League and get them challenging for trophies at home and in Europe.

[ MORE: Dazzling Anfield arrival ]

Klopp, 48, put on a dazzling show during his glitzy unveiling as Liverpool’s new boss on Friday at Anfield, declaring himself as the “Normal One” when asked of his comparison to Jose Mourinho, while he also revealed that he hopes to turn Liverpool “from doubters into believers” during his time in charge on Merseyside.

Being in the packed press conference in the Centenary Stand at Anfield on Friday, there was a palpable buzz and sense of excitement in the air as the British, German and world ‘s media descended on Anfield. The terraced rows of streets in and around Anfield were busier than usual. All roads led to Anfield. All roads led to Klopp. He didn’t disappoint as he delivered a flawless display of controlled optimism.

Previously he had described this opportunity to manage Liverpool as the “most interesting job in world football” at the moment. Everyone was interested in what he had to say, as he strode into the presser with a beaming smile on his face, wearing a a pair of jeans and a stylish unbuttoned shirt complemented with a trendy blazer. Make no mistake, signing Klopp to a three-year deal is a major coup for the Reds as any of Europe’s giants would have snapped him up had a managerial vacancy arisen over the past four months since he left Borussia Dortmund.

[ MORE: Klopp’s 10 best quotes

Friday marked the biggest managerial appointment for Liverpool in a decade, as all the stops were pulled out to make sure the German coach was given a royal welcome at Anfield, a pantheon of world soccer which he is eager to wake up from its trophyless slumber. After the presser, Klopp was ushered onto the pitch as he posed for pictures in front of the huge $165 million renovation of the Main Stand which will add over 7,000 corporate seats at Anfield and help the club generate extra revenue to compete with the four clubs currently above them — Arsenal, Chelsea, Manchester City and Manchester United — in the Premier League’s rich list. Liverpool’s American owners Fenway Sports Group (FSG) will be celebrating their fifth anniversary at the club next week. This appointment was one of their biggest moments, if not the biggest, to date under John W. Henry and Co.

Klopp has previously spoken about his ability to coach with feeling. On Friday he spoke with feeling, with humor and engaged the audience as mutterings such as “he’s enthralling, gripping, isn’t he?” could be heard among the press. His enthusiastic mannerisms on the sidelines and his ability to conjure fervor from fans and players has been well documented. He is a man who is at one with the working-class people who make up the vast majority of the local fanbases for his previous clubs Mainz and Dortmund, and now his new club, Liverpool. He seems tailor-made for this adventure at Anfield.

Jurgen Klopp at Anfield is unveiled as the new manager of Liverpool FC during a press conference at Anfield on October 9, 2015 in Liverpool, England.
Klopp engages with the press.

In the past three seasons, hope of success flickered brightly at first, then intermittently, before fading in recent months. Liverpool failed to win a single piece of silverware under Brendan Rodgers, with the Northern Irishman finally shown the exit door last Sunday. In Rodgers’ place stands a coach who has been here before.

At Dortmund Klopp rebuilt the team from relegation candidates to two-time Bundesliga champions in his seven years in charge. He led them to the UEFA Champions League final (where they lost narrowly to German rivals Bayern Munich at Wembley) and built a young squad who was hungry to succeed and bought into his methods of high-pressing early in games and pacey counters later.

The similarities between the situation Klopp now finds himself in at Liverpool are strikingly similar to the one he acquired at Dortmund when he arrived from Mainz in 2008.

“We did in Dortmund what we had to do, to improve the players, to work for a common idea of play. That is what we did and its the same thing we want to do here. They are not the same players of course,” Klopp told NBC Sports ProSocerTalk. “These players from Liverpool are better, more experienced in some ways and younger in other cases. Everything is okay, I am here. I am not here only because LFC was calling. I believe in the potential of this team. Four or five strikers you can work with when they are not injured, midfielders is really good, defenders experienced and very young, goalkeeper is really good. Everything is there.

“Now we have to work. The problem in football is that you can be as good as you want but you always have to play against other teams. You have no influence on how good they are before the game. But in the game, if they are better, you have to bring them to your level. On your level you can kill every team. If they are not so good, you have to win. That is football.”

A towering six-foot four-inch veteran of the 2. Bundesliga during his playing days, Klopp’s soccer brain has been revered and he takes his staff wherever he goes. Longtime allies Zeljko Buvac (who he nicknames ‘the brain’) and analyst Peter Krawietz have joined Klopp at Liverpool, as he aims to replicate the success he had at Dortmund. He also revealed he is comfortable with the transfer committee which many blamed for Rodgers’ downfall. “It’s enough for me to have the first and last word.”

Liverpool’s 25-year wait for a 19th league championship may not end anytime soon but under Klopp FSG have got the man they were after. As he mentioned when saying: “I am not here only because LFC was calling. I believe in the potential of this team,” Klopp has placed his managerial reputation on the line to try and stir a sleeping giant of English soccer with his raucous celebrations and infectious enthusiasm set to grace the touchline for at least the next three years at Liverpool. If this initial appearance before the press is anything to go by, Klopp will bring plenty of life to the PL.

He has become the second German to coach in the Premier League, after the short-stint of Felix Magath at Fulham almost two years ago, and Klopp’s English is very, very good as he engaged with the press and put on a flawless show of charisma, style and confidence.

“In Jurgen Klopp we have appointed a world-class manager with a proven track record of winning and someone who has the personality and charisma to reignite this football club and take the team forward,” Liverpool chairman Tom Werner said in a statement. “He possesses all the qualities we are looking for in a manager, he is a strong, inspirational leader, who has a clear philosophy of high energy, attacking football. Critically, he is also a winner and someone who can connect with and enthuse our supporters.”

The club. The fans. The players. Klopp blends it all together perfectly. He gets what a club like Liverpool means to the fans and now shares their hopes and dreams.

Perhaps one of the most poignant quotes to come from Klopp was that he wants his players to believe, not be downtrodden by, the huge expectation placed on them by the fans and the media worldwide.

“It is a really important thing that the players feel the difference from now on,” Klopp said. “They have to think they can reach the expectations of all the people, of all the fans, of the press. We have to change from doubters to believers. We have to change our performance, of course, but stop thinking about money. It is only about football.”

There was no football played on Friday as Klopp will get to work early next week when the majority of his squad arrive back at Melwood from international duty. But the talking he did on Friday, with charisma oozing from his comments in both English and German, impressed and proved he is relaxed and capable of delivering success to a club which has been crying out for it for a very long time.

Euro qualifying Friday preview: Lopsided scores in the offing?

Harry Kane, England
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Spain can book its place in France with a win over Luxembourg on Friday, just one of several match ups of giants and minnows on the docket.

The real Group C battle is for second in the group, as Ukraine should easily pick up three points against basement-dwelling Macedonia, which would keep its Top Two hopes alive should Slovakia drop unlikely points at home to Belarus.

Roy Hodgson has set England’s sights on an undefeated run through group play, and that could crush Estonia’s hopes in Group E. Sitting fourth, two points back of Slovenia, Estonia has a tough duo of matches to finish (Switzerland is next).

The Swiss, for their part, have No. 6 San Marino, while Slovenia can stay in they playoff driver seat with a win versus Lithuania.

Will Austria be on cruise control, given it’s won Group G in a landslide? Montenegro will hope so, but their hopes also hinge on Sweden and Russia picking up historic upset losses on the road.

Macedonia vs. Ukraine
Slovakia vs. Belarus
Spain vs. Luxembourg
England vs. Estonia
Slovenia vs. Lithuania
Switzerland vs. San Marino
Liechtenstein vs. Sweden
Moldova vs. Russia
Montenegro vs. Austria