Scotland v United States

Assessing the aftermath of Christen Press’s bombshell debut


How do you steal the show from names like Alex Morgan and Abby Wambach? If you’re Christen Press, you do what you’ve always done – what you’re getting better at seemingly every game. You score goals.

The Stanford alum did that on Saturday, marking her senior national team debut with two goals in the first 32 minutes of the U.S.’s 4-1 victory over Scotland. In the process, Press vindicated everybody who called for the 2010 MAC Herman (soccer Heisman) winner to have a bigger part in the national team. Under Pia Sundhage, that never happened, but in the first game of the Tom Sermanni era, Press got the call.

That she started at right midfield underscored the problems Press has faced. She may be accomplished, and with 17 goals last year in Sweden, she may be prolific. But the United States has Alex Morgan. They have Abby Wambach. They have Sydney Leroux and they have Lauren Cheney. The line at forward is long and entrenched.

But with Megan Rapinoe a late arrival from Lyon, there was an opening at right midfield, a spot that would have usually gone to Heather O’Reilly. Yet in the first eye-opening decision of the Tom Sermanni era, the uncapped, overlooked forward from Tyreso got a start wide. The result: Two goals in the first 32 minutes and message sent. Press is ready for senior team duty.

As you’d expect from anybody playing out of position, it wasn’t a perfect night. Press failed to create opportunities when matched one-on-one with Scotland’s left back, and her first four crosses failed to connect. She clearly is not a right winger at this point in her career, but she also pretty clearly deserves to be in the team. At some point, her overall ability has to win out.

Press’s stellar performance raises two interesting and potentially sensitive issues:

First, it would be safe to assume Press didn’t become good overnight. Tom Sermanni may prove to be a miracle-worker, but for now, it’s much more reasonable to assume Press has been very good for some time and is only now getting a look. In two professional seasons since leaving Stanford (between WPS and Sweden), she has 25 goals in 40 games. Why is this the first we’ve seen of her in the red, white and blue?

We know why. Continuity was a strength of Pia Sundhage’s teams, but it was a weakness for the larger program. Even Ali Krieger, one of the best full backs in the world, had trouble breaking into the team before performance and fitness issues forced Sundhage’s hand on Heather Mitts. Without a doubt, Sundhage’s ability to maintain a delicate U.S. Women’s National Team ecosystem helped the team win gold in London, but it also meant players like Press were neglected.

What other players could help, if they were given a chance? Yael Averbuch showed a flash on Saturday. What about Kristie Mewis as a more advanced option in midfield? Is Julie Johnston ready to be a senior team regular? Maybe somebody like Becky Sauerbrunn could benefit from being looked at with new eyes.

Christen Press was the big winner on Saturday, but her immediate impact could open doors for others. It could also spur new competition for spots that were previously off limits.

Second, Press seems like a better player now than she was when she left for Europe. I say “seems” because one game is not enough to know for sure; however, it would make sense that a top player has improved between ages 23 and 24.

What also makes sense is seeing a young player improve with steady reps against top competition. The moment-to-moment technical quality we saw from Press on Saturday was striking. That’s the kind of game you develop when your talent meets the regular training, games, and expectations of higher level club soccer. You don’t get that in college, and Press didn’t quite get the in a final WPS season played in the wake of a World Cup. The only way you learn to constantly be “on” is to be around a bunch of players who can take advantage of when you’re “off.”

It’s still unclear whether the National Women’s Soccer League will meet that standard. But Press is in Sweden. So are Yael Averbuch and midfielder Meghan Klingenberg. Tobin Heath and Megan Rapinoe are in France, where U-20 prospect Lindsay Horan is based. Sarah Hagen is in Germany.

Will the NWSL be able to provide the same opportunities that France, Germany and Sweden give players like Press? It better hope so, because with so many U.S. internationals playing domestically, the program can’t afford a league that’s not fully developing players. If part of Press’s improvement can be attributed to the Damallsvenskan’s virtues, you can be sure the U.S.’s closest competitors are also reaping the benefits.

MLS Cup Playoffs: LA Galaxy 3-1 Real Salt Lake (video)

Los Angeles Galaxy defender Jelle Van Damme (37) congratulates forward Alan Gordon (9) for scoring against the Real Salt Lake during the first half of a knockout round MLS playoff soccer match in Carson, Calif., Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)
AP Photo/Alex Gallardo
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The game in 100 words (or less): The LA Galaxy are through to the conference semifinals of the MLS Cup Playoffs, where they’ll take on the Colorado Rapids beginning Sunday, for the seventh time in eight years with a 3-1 knockout-round triumph over Real Salt Lake at the StubHub Center on Wednesday. Alan Gordon put the home side ahead inside the first quarter-hour before RSL drew level seven minutes later, but Emmanuel Boateng bagged a quickfire brace to complete a pair of brilliant individual exhibitions of dribbling inside the penalty area. With Steven Gerrard unavailable and Robbie Keane only fit to feature off the bench, Bruce Arena turned to Gordon, who gave way to Keane early in the second half after picking up an injury of his own, to play the fulcrum of the Galaxy attack, and it worked to near-perfection during the opening half-hour. Landon Donovan started the game and played 87 minutes, providing the kind of defensive work rate that’s been missing up and down the flanks of LA all season. Sebastian Lletget put in a near-flawless passing performance while playing deep in midfield. Don’t look now, but those are the Galaxy’s biggest question of 2016, all just about answered as the playoffs begin. I won’t say, “I told you so” if/when they win MLS Cup 2016, but…

[ MORE: All of PST’s MLS Cup Playoffs preview coverage ]

Three Four moments that mattered

14′ — Gordon finishes from close range for 1-0 — Landon Donovan -> Giovani dos Santos -> Alan Gordon. Just like Bruce Arena drew it up in preseason midseason last month this week this morning.

21′ — Plata converts from the spot after Morales’ dive — Javier Morales was angling for a penalty from the moment he entered the penalty area. All Emmanuel Boateng had to do was look at him, and Morales was going down.

26′ — Boateng weaves through to make it 2-1 — Left. Right. Left. Right. Left. Boateng took advantage of some poor defending, and the Galaxy were back in the lead.

34′ — Boateng cuts inside, blows past his man, makes it 3-1 — There’s playing in top gear, and there’s having an extra gear that you rarely have to use because no one else on the field has it. Boateng falls into the latter category.

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Men of the match: Emmanuel Boateng

Goalscorers: Gordon (14′), Plata (21′), Boateng (26′, 34′)

MLS Cup Playoffs: Toronto FC 3-1 Philadelphia Union (video)

Sebastian Giovinco, Toronto FC
Chris Young/The Associated Press via AP
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The game in 100 words (or less): 10 years later, Toronto FC are MLS Cup Playoffs victors. For eight seasons, the playoffs eluded them altogether. Last year, they were one-and-done in embarrassing fashion at the hands of their local rivals. In 2016, it was  their year — a proclamation we’d heard plenty times before — and so far, they’ve lived up to the hype. Wednesday’s 3-1 home victory over the Philadelphia Union in the knockout round gets the monkey off the Reds’ back, but more importantly, afforded Sebastian Giovinco, who bagged a goal and an assist on the night (his second straight game with such a line), 90 more minutes of game time after missing more than a month through injuries as the regular season wound down. After 270 minutes of action, the Atomic Ant looks sharp as ever, and destined to terrorize New York City FC, whom TFC will face in the conference semifinals, beginning Sunday.

[ MORE: All of PST’s MLS Cup Playoffs preview coverage ]

Three Four moments that mattered

15′ — Atlidore feeds Giovinco for 1-0 — The first playoff goal in TFC’s 10-year history. Poor goalkeeping, ball-watching defending, terrible touches, an overhead cross, and a strike off the crossbar. There’s a lot going on here. Watch it all right here.

49′ — Osorio slams home from the corner for 2-0 — The Union have been bad at defending set pieces all season, so is it at all surprising a set-piece gaffe effectively ended their season? No, it’s not.

73′ — Bedoya puts the loose ball home for 2-1 — Speaking of failing to effectively clear a corner kick, the Union were gifted a lifeline 15 minutes before full-time.

85′ — Altidore puts it out of reach, seals it for TFC — Ken Tribbet did not have the best night a center back has ever seen. His final blunder resulted in Jozy Altidore reclaiming TFC’s two-goal lead, and ending the Union’s 2016 season.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s MLS coverageStandings | Stats | Schedule ]

Men of the match: Sebastian Giovinco

Goalscorers: Giovinco (15′), Osorio (49′), Bedoya (73′), Altidore (85′)

Men In Blazers podcast: Mourinho’s Chelsea return; Bradley’s 1st point

Men In Blazers
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Rog and Davo break down Jose Mourinho’s return to Chelsea with Manchester United, another stumble for Manchester City and Bob Bradley’s first Premier League point.

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VIDEO: Altidore, Giovinco combine for TFC’s first-ever playoff goal

Sebastian Giovinco
Chris Young/The Associated Press via AP
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It’s been 10 years in the making, and Toronto FC finally have their first-ever goal in the MLS Cup Playoffs.

[ MORE: All of PST’s MLS Cup Playoffs preview coverage ]

After failing to qualify for the playoffs in each of their first eight seasons, 2015 saw the Reds venture into the postseason for the first time ever, only to be thumped in the knockout round, 3-0, by their 401 derby rival Montreal Impact, of all sides.

This is the year, though, or so we’ve said and been told all season long. While it remains to be seen how deep of a run TFC can muster in 2016, they’ll always have the Jozy Altidore‘s terrible first touch; Altidore’s wayward second and third touches; Altidore’s overhead cross; and Sebastian Giovinco’s strike, all of which you can watch in all its hilarity glory below.

[ MORE: Power rankings — Playoffs edition | MLS Cup predictions ]