Philadelphia Union v DC United - Disney Pro Soccer Classic

MLS needs a re-think on enforcing preseason discipline


The matches are about to be real, and so will be the suspensions for those who misbehave.

Until now, Major League Soccer players have been operating in a gray area. It may be time to ask whether they should be?

The pressure point here will be Saturday’s not-so-friendly preseason tournament contest between D.C. United and East Coast rival Philadelphia – a contest that got fairly nasty.

The Washington Post’s Steven Goff was there to report on the 59th minute incident, when United captain Dwayne De Rosario was ejected for allegedly head-butting his former teammate, Danny Cruz.

The preseason friendlies get this way too often. It’s easy to blame the referees for failing to take control, but these are tough situations for the men in the middle.

The players aren’t ignorant; they understand that actual jeopardy is almost non-existent. Yellow card? So what, they don’t accumulate and mean nothing for the player once the real games begin. (First kick is Saturday, the schedule is here.)

Red card? The stakes are minimal since players and coaches don’t really care about results. Leaving your team a man down, if we’re honest, is really no biggie in the big picture.

Plus, there’s no carry-over in terms of missing the next match. In fact, in plenty of cases referees will simply ask the player to leave or ask a manager to remove them from the field rather than issuing a red card per se. As these contests are all about getting teams tuned up for the regular season, and generally about nothing else, coaches on both sides prefer to keep the games at a more useful 11-on-11.

Fly in too hard or recklessly on a tackle? Players generally aren’t hurting their teams if the referee takes action. Exact a little retribution against a player with whom there is history? Why not? They are likely to get away with it sans any punitive action.

What is the answer? MLS should be slightly more proactive in issuing suspensions that carry into the season. Or perhaps issue a two-match suspension for upcoming preseason contests.That would get players attention, at least, as they would hate being left behind when teammates were getting ahead on fitness and match sharpness.

Jurgen Klopp announced as new Liverpool manager

Jurgen Klopp, Liverpool FC
Leave a comment

Enough with the speculation and reports already, because it’s finally officially official: Jurgen Klopp has been appointed the newest manager of Liverpool Football Club, the Merseyside club announced on Thursday.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s PL coverage ]

Klopp will be unveiled to the world at an introductory press conference at Anfield on Friday.

According to early reports, Klopp’s three-year contract could pay him as much as $10 million per season.

[ QUOTE KING: Top 10 “Klopp-isms” from his time at Dortmund ]

The 48-year-old German has been out of work since stepping down at Bundesliga side Borussia Dortmund following a seventh-place finish to the 2014-15 season. Klopp’s seven seasons in charge of Dortmund weren’t without success and silverware, though, as he led Der BVB to back-to-back league titles in 2011 and 2012, a German Cup triumph in 2012 and a UEFA Champions League final appearance in 2013.

Mourinho “working like never before” to turn Chelsea around

Jose Mourinho, Chelsea FC
Leave a comment

Jose Mourinho got the dreaded much-needed vote of confidence from Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich last weekend, seemingly giving the Portuguese manager a temporary stay of execution despite the Blues’ worst start to a season in 37 years.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s PL coverage ]

Speaking this week, Mourinho has revealed that while he’s thankful to have been kept on at the club for which he regularly professes his love, he still thinks it was no-brainer for Abramovich. In other words, Mourinho’s not backing down from his incredible, seven-minute rant to one question following Saturday’s defeat to Southampton.

Mourinho, on what he’s doing to turn Chelsea around — quotes from the Guardian:

“It shows the confidence of Abramovich in the manager who has won three Premier League titles with this club. I thank him and I keep working.

“What’s going on? I do not know. The results with Chelsea at the moment have been really bad. I cannot hide that reality, and I don’t want to. And I struggle to find an explanation. But I assure you: I’m working like never before and we will come out of this. And there is also the Champions League that we will not neglect, for certain.”

What did you expect from Mourinho? Well, you know, I should probably be fired, but thanks to Mr. Abramovich for not realizing this and keeping me employed? It’s simultaneously interesting and the least surprising thing ever, though, that Mourinho claims to not know what’s wrong with Chelsea at the moment. Of course he has a theory (or five), and of course he’s “working like never before” to correct it.

[ MORE: Ozil, Coquelin say Arsenal can win the title this season ]

The most fascinating thing about Chelsea’s sluggish start to the season is to see, hear and read Mourinho speaking from a position of powerlessness. Always the clever one, the one dictating where the discussion goes, the one in charge of every press interaction, Saturday’s rant felt like watching a desperate Mourinho grasping for anything by which to pull himself back up.