Ricardo Salazar, Marvin Chavez, Tim Ream

Mass confrontation is a complete embarrassment, and MLS is doing something about it


Compared to every other league in the world, Major League Soccer proves very proactive. Last year, they formalized an aggressive system of retroactive review. They jumped to the front of the line trying to be guinea pigs for instant replay. And now they’re tackling one of the more annoying issues in world soccer, something they’ve labeled “mass confrontation.”

Just reading those words should immediately conjure an imagine. There’s a disputed call, most likely during a tense moment in the match, and one team starts crowding around a referee. They’re in his face. They’re attacking with numbers. Often, they’re implicitly using their physicality to intimidate.

We saw it yesterday in the Copa del Rey. Andres Iniesta fell in the arc and earned a whistle. Real Madrid disagreed. Next thing you know, Alvaro Arbeloa, Sergio Ramos, Angel Di Maria, and Gonzalo Higuain are all crowding around Alberto Undiano.

And I know this is going to come as a great shock to you, but Undiano declined to change his call. I know, right? Turns out the mass confrontation was pointless. Who knew?

This year in Major League Soccer, mass confrontation will be worse than pointless. It will be detrimental. From the good work of The Washington Post’s Soccer Insider, Steven Goff:

Troubled by swarms of players disrupting a match, the league’s board of governors has approved a rule that would penalize teams and coaches when three or more individuals confront a referee or opponent.

The MLS disciplinary committee would issue a warning for a first offense. Subsequent incidents would result in a fine for both the club and head coach. The league declined to specify amounts, but multiple sources told the Insider the committee would levy penalties of $5,000 for a team and $1,000 for a coach.

I’d love to see the word “suspension” in here, but I don’t get the feeling there’s the will for that. So this is a good step one. If it doesn’t work, we could see tougher punishment next year.

And if MLS is serious about killing mass confrontations, they’re going to give this more teeth. These fines are not going to change behavior, especially when they don’t hit player pocket books.

But as with anything involving management and labor, this is a process. And as far as processes go, this is a decent first step. Anything to address this inanity would be a decent first step.

Mass confrontation is really one of the worst things that happens between the lines. It’s not the worst, but it’s arguably the most inexplicable. It’s one of the moment where every petty complaint about rich athletes looks justifiable. It’s where you get to see the kind of  immaturity, lack of perspective and spoiled behavior that many people consider endemic to professional athlete culture.

That’s why mass confrontations are so aggravating. You know these guys aren’t really like that, but when they throw these collaborative fits, how do you argue the point? “They’re not normally like this.” No, but they’re like this right now!

Address the issue is another example of Major League Soccer being proactive. A lot of their ability to do that is enabled by their league’s structure, but as we see from other leagues, being proactive about the game isn’t a given with these organizations.

Agent: “There’s no hatred” between Bale, Ronaldo

Gareth Bale & Cristiano Ronaldo, Real Madrid CF
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Gareth Bale doesn’t at all dislike Cristiano Ronaldo — or vice versa — despite what may seem a lukewarm on-field relationship between the two Real Madrid superstars, insists Jonathan Barnett, agent of Bale.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s PL coverage ]

Instead, Barnett insists that the two men with very different personalities have a healthy relationship, and competition, that pushes each Galactico to be the best player he can be.

Barnett, on Bale’s relationship with Ronaldo — quotes from the Guardian:

“They don’t go out eating every night together, but it’s fine. There’s no hatred there. Gareth is a quiet guy. They’re complete opposites. But I think Gareth can learn a little bit from Ronaldo as well, interacting maybe a little bit. But he wants his own life and he lives it. Gareth is a great footballer, he doesn’t want anything more. He has some very good endorsements but his whole life is to be the best footballer in the world. I don’t think he wants to be the best model in the world or the best underwear seller. That’s not him.”

That’s a hilarious closing quote from Barnett, but he knows exactly how some folks are going to interpret it: “Bale thinks Ronaldo loves himself too much.”

[ MORE: Giroud: “I must harden myself” to unseat Walcott ]

There’s nothing better for the ultimate success of a team than healthy, friendly competition between teammates who are spectacularly talented as Ronaldo and Bale. The former will only be around to perform at his current level for so much longer, but at what point does the latter officially take the torch and supplant Madrid’s biggest star, and how accepting will he be of passing that proverbial torch?

Olivier Giroud: “I must harden myself” to unseat Walcott

Olivier Giroud, France
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Is it just me, or does the press really only ever get noteworthy quotes from players during international breaks?

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s PL coverage ]

I suppose it’s not surprising, given Premier League players get away from the mean ole British press, go back to their respective homelands and speak with journalists they’ve likely known since their early playing days, thus feel more comfortable opening up about key issues.

Anyway, today we have Olivier Giroud essentially calling himself out for having lost the starting striker’s job at Arsenal because he’s been outplayed of late by Theo Walcott. As discussed before, this is bad news for Giroud because he’s now falling down the depth chart for France with next summer’s European Championship on the horizon.

[ MORE: Aguero admits he wants Guardiola link-up ]

Giroud, on losing his place at Arsenal — quotes from the Guardian:

“At Arsenal, I am in competition with Theo for the striker position. But he is doing well at the moment, so there is no reason to change.

“Whether it was at Tours, Montpellier or Arsenal, I have never experienced a situation like this, I have often played from the start. I need to take positives and to harden myself mentally. It is something new for me.

“I was in [Walcott’s] place in previous seasons at Arsenal. I imagine what he must have been thinking. But I feel that the coach believes in me.”

Giroud goes on to cast into doubt his own confidence, stating in very certain terms he needs “to believe more in [his] abilities.” Giroud’s always come across as a bit of an existentialist, but it’s always strange to hear players publicly call themselves out — particularly their confidence — as if that’s not going to increase the pressure currently weighing down on them.

[ MORE: Rodgers reportedly chosen to take over at Aston Villa ]

The next eight months are going to be monumentally important in Giroud’s career, as the 29-year-old attempts to prove he’s worth keeping around at Arsenal and deserving of a place in the national team squad for next summer’s EUROs, which are to be played in France.