Merseyside Derby Preview: Can Everton overcome 14 year drought or will Liverpool continue its dominance?


When Everton take the trip across Stanley Park to face Liverpool on Sunday it will mark the 220th meeting between the two Merseyside clubs. For Everton, the encounter presents an opportunity to remain on pace for a crack at European football and the chance to break a 14 year winless streak at Anfield. For Liverpool, the match offers a chance to extend their derby dominance and provide further evidence that there’s life after Luis Suarez.

Everton enter the match having lost only once in their last nine Premier League outings. That loss came two weeks ago at the hands of a rejuvenated Sunderland side, buoyed by their peppery new manager, Paulo Di Canio. The Toffees collected themselves well after the defeat, returning home to Goodison Park where they thoroughly outplayed a lackluster Fulham side for a 1-0 victory.

While Everton have done well to persevere through difficult circumstances, scoring goals has become an issue having only found the back of the net twice in the last three matches. It hasn’t been for lack of chances – the Toffees have had 49 cracks at goal during the stint – rather the failure to capitalize. Nikica Jelavic is the primary culprit, having scored only eight times in 42 appearances this season and only once since Christmas. For a man who scored 11 times in 16 games over the second half of last season after moving to Goodison Park, it’s a sizeable drought.

But the burden not only falls on Jelavic. Highly touted players like Marouane Fellaini (1 goal in his last 8 league matches), Kevin Mirallas (goal-less in his last 4 league matches), Victor Anichebe (1 goal in his last 8 league matches) and Leon Osman (1 goal in his last 7 league matches) all need to raise their offensive output if the Blues are to stay on par for a Top 5 finish. Currently 6th in the table, the Toffees are three points behind 5th place Tottenham (who have a game in hand), five points behind 4th place Arsenal and six points behind 3rd place Chelsea (also, with a game in hand). In other words, Sunday’s match presents a must-win scenario if David Moyes’ side are to keep their European dreams alive.

The problem is that winning at Anfield is easier said than done for Everton. It’s been 14 years (September 1999) since Kevin Campbell’s solitary strike saw the Blues taste victory at Anfield. The dry spell represents a major blemish on Moyes’ Goodison Park resume leaving the Scot desperate to record his first win in front of the Kop in what could end up being his final Merseyside derby.

Liverpool, however, aren’t a sentimental group and won’t look to be doing the Everton gaffer any favors as they seek to right a season gone wrong. The arrival of Brendan Rodgers, an ever evolving roster of players, and a season filled with highs and lows surrounding enigmatic striker Luis Suarez has left the Reds 7th in the table, five points adrift of their Merseyside brothers.

Despite the drama, the Reds have grown a more consistent side of late and enter the match on a five game league unbeaten streak. Last week Rodgers’ side tore apart Newcastle in a 6-0 thrashing at St. James’ Park. In Liverpool’s best display this season, the club put aside Suarez’ bite-gate controversy to show they are much more than a single striker threat. January arrival Philippe Coutinho, playing in an increasingly free-range role behind Daniel Sturridge, was the star once again as he devoured the plethora of space Newcastle afforded him. Sturridge and Jordan Henderson each notched braces in the match, deserved coups for two players who have grown by leaps and bounds during the 2012-13 season.

Having played themselves out of European qualification, the only realistic aim for Steven Gerrard’s side is to overtake Everton in the table and to continue inflicting derby pain. Since the captain’s first derby in April 1999, Liverpool have played 28 Merseyside contests in the league, winning 16 and losing only four times.

For Stevie G, Sunday may not carry the significance of derby’s past but it nevertheless presents an opportunity to hand Jamie Carragher a final Merseyside victory and Kopites a psychological edge over their blue neighbors.

“That’s why the derby is so special,” Gerrard said. “It isn’t about the points or about what you could achieve. It’s not about where you are in the table. It’s about having those bragging rights in the city.”

$280m? Who cares? Salah is the rare “unsellable” player


The gossip reports are out there, with lofty claims that Real Madrid and Barcelona are willing to pay as much as $280 million dollars for Mohamed Salah.

Normally that figure triggers something in my brain that screams, “Sell! Sell! Sell before they realize what they’ve offered!”

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That’s not happening with Mohamed Salah.

This isn’t an inflated fee for a young English player like Ross Barkley or John Stones, nor is it a club throwing a lofty and desperate figure at a very good but supremely overvalued player like Philippe Coutinho. Even Raheem Sterling, who I advocated selling, has proven replaceable.

In the case of Salah, his Golden Boot figure is likely to dwarf any in the Premier League era. He’s at 28, three behind Luis Suarez’s 31. Cristiano Ronaldo has bagged 31 once Alan Shearer and Andy Cole hold the modern record with 34.

Salah needs six to tie Shearer. Here’s Liverpool’s run-in: Crystal Palace (A), Everton (A), Bournemouth (H), West Brom (A), Stoke City (H), Chelsea (A), Brighton and Hove Albion (H).

Five of those teams absolutely hemorrhage goals. Would you bet against Salah?

By the way, Salah has 10 assists, too. Sure Jurgen Klopp deserves credit for buying and deploying the Egyptian wizard, but

When Klopp argued that Liverpool was not a selling club, this is the exact example to follow. Selling Coutinho — again, not trying to poke the bear that is ornery overvaluing fan — is fine in a world where your club has Roberto Firmino, Sadio Mane, and Mohamed Salah

But selling one of Europe’s leading scorers is almost never okay for a club challenging for a Champions League crown and with the clear caliber of a Premier League title hunter.

I’d argue that for this club, one who has sold Coutinho and Suarez, there is not a fee that meets Salah straight-on.  He’s 25 and living in the air just below Lionel Messi and Neymar.

The Messi comparisons I keep reading are fun but still unbelievably premature by every stretch of the imagination. By the time Messi was Salah’s age he had league seasons of 34, 31, 50, and was en route to a 46-goal mark. He posted 68 combined assists over those four seasons.

If this is somehow an aberration, and Salah cannot find this form ever again, well, that’s bad luck and a risk worth its weight in standard setting.

There is not a replacement player.

There is no fee.

Say it again now.

Dangerous playmaker Silva joins Montreal Impact (video)

Photo by Marcelo Endelli/Getty Images

Alejandro Silva’s got a creative mind, and that’s something Montreal will welcome with open arms.

The Uruguayan signed with the Impact this week, joining Ignacio Piatti and Saphir Taider as playmakers in Quebec.

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Silva, 28, is a right-sided and forward-playing attacker who can also play right back if necessary.

The Impact lost two of three to start the season, winning this weekend’s 401 Derby versus Toronto FC to put a number in the win column.

Lanus has been a fertile ground for Major League Soccer clubs in recent years, with Lucas Melano (Portland Timbers) and Miguel Almiron (Atlanta United) making the move to North America.

The South American club has also sent Gustavo Gomez to AC Milan and Oscar Benitez to Benfica.

Kante squashes PSG rumors: “I am at home” with Chelsea

AP Photo/Manu Fernandez
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At least one and erhaps two big Premier League clubs are going to finish outside of the UEFA Champions League this year.

As it stands now, those clubs are Arsenal and Chelsea. The former could still seal a spot in the UCL via winning the Europa League but Chelsea needs wins and help from the field to find a way into the fray.

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An absence for either side will send UCL-bound vultures over the rosters of the failed clubs, hoping to woo the best players with Champions League dreams.

N'Golo Kante has been a name bandied about as a potential departure should Chelsea miss its mark, with the French star mentioned as high atop Paris Saint-Germain’s wish list.

The midfielder, who turns 27 at the end of the month, has moved to squash those rumors (from The London Evening Standard):

“I am at home. It is my club, I am a Chelsea player.

“We will fight until the end to finish in the top four and to get in a Champions League position. We also have the FA Cup to play for – it is a good competition. Last season we failed in the final. It is the only trophy we can win this season, so we have to give everything to get to the final and win it.”

That’s good, because we’re looking forward to seeing what a midfield with Kante and Tiemoue Bakayoko could do with an offseason together.

Yet is there anyone out there doubting Kante’s intentions?

Who’ve been the most impactful Premier League summer buys?

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It’s been a heck of a season for Premier League transfer buys, and that includes a bevy of intra-league purchases.

So who’ve been the best imports? Probably a safe bet to set some parameters.

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We won’t count players like Aaron Mooy, who’s Huddersfield Town purchase was formalized after a loan, or those who returned from loan like Chelsea’s Andreas Christensen or Arsenal’s Jack Wilshere.

We’ll also opt against a couple Chelsea loanees signings, if just to whittle our list. Ruben Loftus-Cheek was magnificent before a long-term injury at Palace, and Kurt Zouma probably just sits beyond the Top Ten.

Mainz loanee Jonas Lossl of Huddersfield Town fits the bill, too. And for injuries: Who knows how high  Benjamin Mendy would’ve surged up this list?

Stats culled from WhoScored and Squawka.

Honorable mention – Antonio Rudiger, Mario Lemina, Richarlison, Alexandre Lacazette, Mat Ryan, Bernardo Silva, Steve MounieKyle Walker, Alvaro Morata, Florian Lejeune.

10. Jordan Pickford, Everton — Under siege at Sunderland for most of last season, Pickford probably expected smoother sailing than this: the Everton backstop has been forced into making the most saves in the Premier League (95). Fifty-four of those required him to dive. Only four teams have allowed more goals than Everton, which explains why some of you might be scratching your head at his inclusion.

9. James Tomkins, Crystal Palace — I thought the signing was silly, but Tomkins is nearly unrivaled in terms of interceptions per game in league play. Palace hasn’t been a defensive powerhouse, but his former club West Ham looks terrible since he moved across London.

8. Davinson Sanchez, Tottenham Hotspur – There have been bumps along the way — Sanchez is 21 — but he’s blessed with the speed to make up for his and others mistakes. A fine passer, Mauricio Pochettino should only further benefit from his career progression.

7. Ahmed Hegazi, West Bromwich Albion — Hegazi’s 2757 minutes played are the most amongst field players in the Premier League (though Alfie Mawson, Harry Maguire, Jack Cork, and Lewis Dunk could pass him by playing more than an hour in their match-in-hand).

6. Harry Maguire, Leicester City — The Foxes badly needed to lower the age of their center back corps, and can count their purchase of Maguire from Hull City as a coup. Perhaps no player other than Wilfred Ndidi has been as influential for Claude Puel‘s bunch.

5. Romelu Lukaku, Manchester United — Lukaku started dispelling myths about his production versus big teams when he was one of the lone stars in United’s Super Cup loss to Real Madrid. While he’s been up-and-down in terms of goals in said contests, his hold-up play and work ethic have been better than expected. His 21 key moments (14 goals, seven assists) are even with Roberto Firmino and trail only Mohamed Salah, Kevin De Bruyne, Raheem Sterling, Harry Kane, Sergio Aguero, and Leroy Sane. Anthony Martial is the closest United comparison, and he has 14. Paul Pogba and Jesse Lingard have 12.

4. Pascal Gross, Brighton and Hove Albion — The Ingolstadt transfer’s promise was quickly realized, and he’s posted five goals and eight assists. On a team with the fourth-lowest goal total in the league, that’s impressive. The only players with more PL assists: De Bruyne, Sane, Dele, David Silva, Salah, Pogba. Gross also ranks third in the league in crosses per game.

3. Nemanja Matic, Manchester United — It’s hard to fin the numbers to meet the eye test, but Matic flat out makes his team better. Maybe it’s organization, maybe it’s toughness, but there’s little doubt United is better in the middle of the park while former club Chelsea has struggled to find the same form since he skipped town. Advantage: Mou.

2. Ederson, Manchester City — Look only to last season’s status of City net minders to know how important the sweeper-style passing keeper is to Pep Guardiola‘s side. The Brazilian has pushed himself into competition for the starting gig at one of the World Cup favorites.

1. Mohamed Salah, Liverpool —  There is no other answer here, and Harry Kane’s injury essentially gift wraps the Golden Boot to the Egyptian. There was a question as to whether he’d bring his Serie A flourish over to England, and that seems absurd now.