Houston Dynamo v Chicago Fire - Knockout Round

More MLS salary talk: Three teams collecting bad deals

2 Comments

Salary Day around Major League Soccer – let’s find a mainstream sports parallel. Because that’s how these things work, right? Some esoteric event with limited significance that winds up fans and sends them spinning on kitchen floors. The only way to convey its meaning is by looking to the big four. I know how this works.

Let see …It’s the 5×5 rotisserie draft, right? No, not quite right. The salaries are real. Fantasy leagues aren’t. How about the cover announcement for your given EA Sports franchise? Meh, way too far from the field. Really, it’s more like pitchers and catchers reporting, or final cut day for NFL rosters. It has some significance, but if we never heard one peep about it, our sporting lives would change … not at all.

Perhaps the best parallel is Schedule Day in the National Football League. Most of the information is known ahead of time – MLS’s deals either already leaked or carry over from the year before, while the NFL’s matchups are predetermined by a formula – but something about seeing all the details together sends fans buzzing like their favorite band just released another album (and since this is MLS, that album would either be Wilco’s or the dialog track from an Arrested Development rerun). The order of the games, Monday night slots, Thanksgiving assignments – they give football fans something to fill that offseason void. It’s the morning donut – fun, harmless, inconsequentially unless you overindulge.

For MLS fans, the players union’s release sparks a few hours of fervent social media analysis, where “Broncos play Cowboys on Thanksgiving” is replaced by “this sure looks different without Beckham and Marquez.” That Week 17 matchup between Green Bay and Minnesota? Where Adrian Peterson might be going for 2,105 and a playoff spot? That’s MLS fans and their value-for-money finds. “So Rafael Baca only makes $49,500 but Joel Lindpere’s still a $200,000 player?”

[MORE: Major League Soccer’s top earners]

He does, but in insolation, that’s mostly trivia. One good or bad signing isn’t going to break a salary cap, especially when the maximum most players can count against the salary cap is limited by the designated player rule. If, however, you start collecting a bunch of Baca-esque deals? They you’ve really got something. The dollar shaved here, shaved there give you the ability to take some chances, overpay for a project, or take on some players whose veteran rates no longer fit into others’ budgets. You don’t have to be Billy Beane to figure this out.

We’ll look at some of those situations later. Here I want to look at the other end of the spectrum – teams who have a number of deals which, while perhaps not bad in isolation (though there are some there), become problematic when they’re part of a greater pattern.

Some caveats here: Some of these deals might be Designated Player contracts, young designated players, Generation adidas, or another of an array of circumstances that means their full salaries may not count against the cap (or, are even being fully covered by their current team). Still, in a league were very few teams are making money, taking on even “off book” salaries can have a huge effect on a team’s ability to go out and acquire more talent.

[MORE: Some Major League Soccer bargains]

With that in mind, here are a few situations you’d like to see your team avoid:

(all salary figures reflect guaranteed compensation)

source:  Chicago Fire

  • Sherjill MacDonald, $527,125
  • Arne Friedrich, $367,500
  • Dily Duka, $273,000
  • Patrick Nyarko, $249,500
  • Joel Lindpere, $205,000
  • Logan Pause, $197,833.33

Also:

  • Alvaro Fernandez, on six-month loan in Qatar, $366,666.67

Again, in isolation, none of these deals are killers, but when you have six players making above-or-around $200,000 who aren’t giving equivalent production, that’s a symptom as much as it is a problem, especially since Duka and Lindpere were added this winter (as were Jeff Larentowicz and Maicon Santos, who combine to make just over $395,000).

Friedrich can’t stay healthy. Duka cost Chicago Dominic Oduro. Nyarko is immensely capable but has 12 goals in five-plus seasons. We have to start considering if Lindpere’s best days are permanently gone, while Pause was made redundant by the Fire’s offseason moves.

Between those six players, that’s just over $1.8 million in salaries. And Fernandez’s loan expires this summer.

source:  Colorado Rapids

  • Marvell Wynne, $285,000
  • Edson Buddle, $275,000
  • Drew Moor, $247,000
  • Pablo Mastroeni, $200,000
  • Atiba Harris, $173,275
  • Danny Mwanga, $171,250
  • Brian Mullan, $170,335

The four guys who were in Commerce City last year – Wynne, Moor, Mastroeni, and Mullan – are just kind of overpaid. Really, it’s not a big deal when you’re being shrew elsewhere. When you’re getting value lower down the list, you can be sentimental with your veterans – understood.

But Buddle? Harris? Mwanga? Colorado went out and got these guys this offseason. You can see the upside in each of them, but having combined for two goals through the Rapids’ first 10 games, you have to wonder if that $600,000 would have been better spent elsewhere.

Consider some of the other goal scorers that moved this offseason: Ryan Johnson ($144,705), Claudio Bieler ($200,000), Fabian Espindola ($150,000), Robert Earnshaw ($155,150). Buddle, Harris, and Mwanga, for similar money, were much less reliable options. Even Kenny Cooper ($342,500) could have been had for some of the money Colorado spent on their upgrades.

source:  D.C. United

  • Dejan Jakovic, $303,341
  • Rafael, $284,625
  • Brandon MacDonald, $273,250
  • Lionard Pajoy, $205,000
  • John Thorrington, $150,000
  • James Riley, $145,000

The disturbing part about this group is that they were all need signings, to one extent or another. On one hand, yeah, when a team needs somebody, of course the sign a new player, yet with this group, we see a tendency to overpay when addressing those needs. That’s a systemic problem.

A couple of years ago, D.C. United’s defense was terrible. They elected to keep an expensive Jakovic and acquire MacDonald. They now have one of the priciest central pairings in the league, even if few would call the duo one of the league’s best.

Pajoy and Rafael were brought in because D.C. United needed strikers, but each make more than Maicon Santos will earn from Chicago this year. Pajoy didn’t cut it in Philadelphia before being traded, and Rafael (a young designated player) had only scored one, circumstantially meaningless goal in Brazilian national league play (all of his production was in the quasi-competitive state league). Through 213 minutes in D.C., his only MLS tally came off a Andy Greunebaum misread.

Thorrington and Riley aren’t super expensive, but they fit the same pattern. D.C. has a need, they spend more than they probably needed to, and the upgrade isn’t obvious. Thorrington’s fitness concerns mean it’s too early to pass judgment on his acquisition, but did D.C. really need James Riley at $145,000 when they already had Chris Korb, Daniel Woolard, and Robbie Russell?

Transfer rumor roundup: Pulisic in demand (Stoke?); Jones, Mangala, Nasri

ALTACH, AUSTRIA - AUGUST 05: Christian Pulisic of Dortmund (c) challenges Patrick Van Aanmolt of Sunderland (l) and Lee Cattermole of Sunderland (r) during the friendly match between AFC Sunderland v Borussia Dortmund at Cashpoint Arena on August 5, 2016 in Altach, Austria.  (Photo by Deniz Calagan/Getty Images)
Photo by Deniz Calagan/Getty Images
Leave a comment

As we discuss whether Bastian Schweinsteiger’s “last club in Europe” comments could mean a move to the United States (or Canada… or China), how about some rumors about an American making a move in Europe?

The Stoke Sentinel claims Mark Hughes is interested in bringing Christian Pulisic on loan from Borussia Dortmund, which would conveniently for USMNT fans put the youngsters in direct contact with veteran leader Geoff Cameron.

BVB boss Thomas Tuchel used Pulisic often toward the end of last season, and the six-times capped 17-year-old scored two goals in 12 matches for the German giants.

[ MORE: Pulis laments loss to Northampton Town ]

Stoke has plenty of talent in attack with Bojan Krkic, Xherdan Shaqiri, and others, and we’re not sure Tuchel would want Pulisic going to a place where he wouldn’t start regularly. He could have that at Dortmund.

Pulisic has also been linked with Red Bull Leipzig, Liverpool, and CSKA Moscow in recent weeks. A Champions League or Europa League club could be more intriguing to Dortmund, who have added a load of attacking talent since Pulisic burst onto the scene last season. Those additions — Mario Gotze, Ousmane Dembele, and Andre Schurrle — would’ve affected Pulisic’s status in the food chain (no shame at all, either).


We told you last night that Phil Jones remains in Jose Mourinho’s plans, and the London Evening Standard says Jones will not wind up at Arsenal, regardless of the interest or wallet of Arsene Wenger.

That’s because longtime rival Mourinho has no interest in helping out Wenger, and also sees a chance for the out-of-favor center back to have a future at Old Trafford.

Jones is behind Daley Blind, Chris Smalling, and Eric Bailly amongst others at United. Southampton’s Jose Fonte could be arriving soon. Will Jones really stay?


Pep Guardiola‘s Manchester City will be without Eliaquim Mangala and Samir Nasri, according to reports. Mangala is being targeted for a loan by Napoli, who is also trying to hold onto Chelsea target Kalidou Koulibaly ($80 million). Several outlets continue to play with the idea that Nasri could head to Besiktas.

Schweinsteiger says Manchester United will be his “last club in Europe”… MLS much?

MARSEILLE, FRANCE - JULY 07:  Olivier Giroud of France shields the ball from Bastian Schweinsteiger of Germany during the UEFA EURO semi final match between Germany and France at Stade Velodrome on July 7, 2016 in Marseille, France.  (Photo by Lars Baron/Getty Images)
Photo by Lars Baron/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Bastian Schweinsteiger is taking the high road when discussing his lack of playing time under Jose Mourinho, and is also fueling fire in Major League Soccer’s rumor mill (along with China, India, and Qatar).

Schweinsteiger, 32, has trained with United’s U-21 side under Mourinho and has also retired from Germany duty.

He took to Twitter on Wednesday to talk to his fan about his “current situation”, saying that United was a dream of his and that he will not be moving to another club in Europe.

Many have speculated that Schweinsteiger could come to Major League Soccer, a league that impressed him when Bayern Munich played the MLS All Stars last summer.

If that happened, who could do with a little “Schweiny”?

  1. Atlanta United — You think Carlos Bocanegra doesn’t know the value of a steady, veteran presence in the middle of his park?
  2. New England Revolution — Remember what the Jermaine Jones signing did for a struggling and off-balance Jay Heaps squad?
  3. DC United and Chicago Fire — This has less to do with need or fit, and more to do with me wanting to see two fan bases getting deserved excitement. And lest we forget that Chicago was done wrong in the Jermaine Jones saga.

West Brom boss Pulis laments EFL Cup loss to Northampton Town

WEST BROMWICH, ENGLAND - AUGUST 20: West Bromwich Albion Manager Tony Pulis  before the Premier League match between West Bromwich Albion and Everton at The Hawthorns on August 20, 2016 in West Bromwich, England. (Photo by Lynne Cameron/Getty Images)
Photo by Lynne Cameron/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Tony Pulis sounds a bit defensive — pun half-intended — about West Brom’s loss to Northampton Town in the EFL Cup on Wednesday.

His Baggies have started the season 1-1, winning at Palace and losing versus Everton, but the loss in a Cup competition is obviously stinging the veteran manager.

[ MORE: Champions League roundup ]

Pulis, 58, started a lineup that should’ve won comfortably, and the team went for it against the League One side in 2-2 (PKs, 4-3) match.

But conceding twice and losing in penalties really angered Pulis, who saw James Morrison and much-maligned striker Saido Berahino miss their kicks.

From the BBC:

“I wish Northampton all the best. They worked really hard and kept at it.

“If we have come here and didn’t open them up and didn’t play well then you can slaughter us, but we did that. We’ve not hit the back of the net and that’s what you have to do.

“I understand supporters – if you’re not winning you’re not going to be happy, whether it’s me or another manager.”

Pulis is 22W-23D-25L as West Brom’s manager, but has done well on the whole with the club. Perhaps his style of play is frustrating, but he’s also brought in weapons like Matty Phillips and Brendan Galloway this year and is attempting to spur the club into something a bit more exciting. His comments have us wondering, though, if he’s feeling a bit of heat.

Burnley’s Andre Gray charged by FA over Twitter posts from 2012

BURNLEY, ENGLAND - AUGUST 13: Andre Gray of Burnley during the Premier League match between Burnley and Cardiff City at Turf Moor on  August 13, 2016 in Burnley, England. (Photo by Lynne Cameron/Getty Images)
Photo by Lynne Cameron/Getty Images
3 Comments

A Premier League player is set to be punished by English football authorities for discriminatory comments he made on social media more than four years ago.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s PL coverage ]

The comments made by Burnley striker Andre Gray between Jan. 9 and March 11, 2012 appeared anti-gay. They came to light on Saturday, when they were retweeted by other people after he scored his first Premier League goal for Burnley in the team’s 2-0 win over Liverpool. Gray released a public apology after the match.

Gray was charged with misconduct on Tuesday by the Football Association, which said the alleged comments “were abusive and/or insulting and/or improper and/or brought the game into disrepute.”

Gray said in his apology “the tweets were posted four years ago when I was a completely different person to the man I am now.”

“I have experienced a lot over the past four years and have had to take responsibility for a number of things in my life which has enabled me to mature and grow as a person since that time,” the 25-year-old Gray said.

“I have a lot of regrets regarding a number of things I’ve done in the past and realize I have made some big mistakes, none more so than these tweets, but I would like to stress that I’ve worked incredibly hard to completely transform my life since that time.”

[ MORE: Champions League roundup — Roma self-destruct; Celtic sneak in ]

Gray said he wanted to clarify that he was “absolutely not homophobic” and to “ask for forgiveness to anyone I offended.”

The FA said Gray had until Aug. 31 to respond to the charge.

“He has moved a long way in life,” Burnley manager Sean Dyche said Tuesday. “He’s made that clear with an apology and also to remind the club, `It’s four years ago, I’m a different person.’

“A lot has gone on in his life to get him where he’s got to, I think he made that clear. It was authentic what he said (in the apology).”

Gray was the top scorer in the second-tier League Championship last season, helping Burnley achieve an immediate return to the Premier League.