A statue of Manchester United's coach Alex Ferguson is seen outside the club's Old Trafford stadium in Manchester

Tracking a legend: The timeline of Alex Ferguson’s success

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Eschewing the unmatched list of honors accumulated over this 27 years at Old Trafford, the most repeated anecdote from Alex Ferguson’s Manchester United tenure is about near failure, not his myriad success. That’s because in 1990, in his fourth year with the Red Devils, Ferguson was reportedly on the verge of being fired, with an away match at Nottingham Forest in the FA Cup expected to be his final game in charge. Yet when Mark Robins’ goal snatched a 1-0 upset from the Reds, Ferguson avoided the sacking everyone, in hindsight, thought inevitable. He went on to claim 13 league titles and two European Cups.

That story, as apocryphal as it has become, is often leveraged by those seeking to admonish capricious boardrooms, a use that conveniently contributes to the deification of the legendary boss. Ferguson is an icon, no doubt, and his accomplishments transcend almost any other manager’s, yet there is a point where the Sir Alex iconography becomes too glib – trite. When Ferguson is portrayed as omnipotent and infallible, the irony of his failures is lost. And it’s in those failures that the we see the true character of his journey.

After three-plus unconvincing seasons, Ferguson was in trouble at United. He was also fired once in Scotland. He’s admitted to mistakes in player management (selling Jaap Stam too soon), and in his one World Cup, Sir Alex failed to win a match. He’s often showed undo loyalty to aging favorites, and over the past four seasons, his squads have been criticized for their glaring weaknesses.

In light of his resume, such critiques are trifles, but they do go to show how little we understand of Ferguson’s success. Unable to identify a tactical, managerial, or psychological silver bullet, we tend to look at 13 titles over the last 21 years, throw our hands up in the air, and ascribe it to something the transcends the successes of contemporaries like Wenger, Mourinho, or Guardiola. All we know: Ferguson is constantly able to remake his squads. As to the philosophies that underpin it? We’re content to leave that to folklore.

The truth, for all its troughs and crests, is always much more interesting. Walking through the timeline of Ferguson’s life in soccer, the momentary failures make his triumphs in the game all the more remarkable:

1957-1974 – Playing days

Ferguson was a forward of some renown, spending two seasons at Glasgow Rangers after commanding a record transfer fee (£65,000) to move from Dunfermline. At one point, Ferguson had an opportunity to move to Nottingham Forest in the English First Division but chose to stay in Scotland, where he spent his entire 16-year career. In 317 league appearances, Ferguson scored 171 goals, including a Scottish League-leading 31 in the 1995-66 season.

1957 – While serving an apprenticeship to be a toolmaker, Ferguson debuts for Queen’s Park as an amateur at the age of 16; scores in first appearance.
1960 – Moves to St. Johnstone, finishing his three-year career at Queen’s Park with 15 goals in 31 league appearances.
1964 – Moves to Dumfermline to become a professional after four, part-time years at St. Johnstone, recording 19 goals in 37 games.
1965-66 – Along with Celtic’s Joe McBride, leads the Scottish First Division with 31 goals. His all competition totals: 45 goals in 51 games.
1967 – Transfers to Glasgow Rangers for a then-record £65,000 fee, ending his three-season stretch at Dunfermline (66 goals, 89 games).
1969 – After two seasons with Rangers, Ferguson turns down Nottingham Forest to sign with Falkirk. He leaves Glasgow having scored 25 times in 41 league appearances.
1973 – After four seasons at Falkirk, Ferguson requests a transfer after new manager Joe Prentice removes him from role as player-coach. After 37 goals in 95 league games, Ferguson moves to Ayr United, where he returns to the part-time ranks in 1973-74 (9 goals, 24 games).

source: Getty Images1974-1986 – Managing in Scotland

At 32 years old, Ferguson got his first managerial job – a part-time assignment with East Stirlingshire in June 1974. The appointment was short-lived. After three months, Ferguson was soon poached by the bigger St. Mirren, who he took from struggling in the second division to first division champions over the course of three seasons. In 1978, however, Ferguson was sacked for issuing unauthorized payments to players and disrespectful behavior toward a secretary. Later, the club’s then-chairmen admitted the reason behind the dismissal was Ferguson’s impending move to Aberdeen.

Over the course of the next eight seasons with the Dons, Ferguson won three Scottish Championships, four Scottish Cups, a League Cup and two European trophies: the 1982-83 Cup Winners’ Cup and the 1983 UEFA Super Cup. Since Ferguson’s title triumph in 1984-85, Aberdeen’s failed to win another Scottish title, and his two continental honors remain the club’s only European trophies.

During his last season at Aberdeen, Ferguson managed the Scottish national team in a caretaker capacity after the untimely passing of Jock Stein. After steering them through a qualifying playoff with Australia, Ferguson saw his team take only one point from their group at Mexico 1986.

Back at Abderdeen, Ferguson turned down approaches from Arsenal and Tottenham Hotspur to make the move to England, but after starting the 1986-87 season with the Dons, Ferguson was soon lured to Manchester United after the firing of Ron Atkinson.

1974 – Takes first managerial job, a part-time position with East Stirlingshire of the Scottish Second Division.
1974 – St. Mirren lures Ferguson away from East Stirlingshire. Ferguson eventually sees them promoted to the first division.
1977 – St. Mirren wins the Scottish First Division, Ferguson’s first major trophy.
1978 – Ferguson’s fired for the only time in his career, joining Aberdeen one month later.
1980 – Abderdeen breaks a 15-year run of Celtic-Rangers dominance by winning the Scottish First Division.
1982 – Ferguson wins his second trophy at Abderdeen, claiming the Scottish Cup.
1983 – Abderdeen wins the Cup Winners’ Cup, eliminating Bayern Munich and Real Madrid along the way. They’d also retain their Scottish Cup and, later that year, win the UEFA Super Cup.
1984 – Abderdeen claim a league-cup double, retaining the Scottish Cup for a third straight season.
1985 – Ferguson wins this third league title at Abderdeen
1986 – The Dons claim both the Scottish and League cups in what would be Ferguson’s last full season at the club. In November, Ferguson leaves to join Manchester United. In between, Scotland goes 0-1-2 at World Cup 1986, with Ferguson managing the team to a fourth place group finish.

1986-2013 – Manchester United: Four generations of success

Among the marvels of Ferguson’s time at Manchester United was a paradox: Monotony amid change. Ferguson leaves renown for his ability to make over a squad, having gone through four distinct generations during his time at Old Trafford, yet the result was always the same. The Red Devils were always among the favorites to win the league, and in bringing home 13 of the league’s 21 titles, Ferguson repeatedly delivered.

His first title team was built around French attacker Eric Cantona, the iconic libertine poached from rival Leeds United to usher in the most important dynasty in English soccer history. Peter Schmiechel, Gary Pallister, Steve Bruce, Denis Irwin, Paul Ince, and Mark Hughes were also part of 1992-93’s breakthrough squad, as was a young Ryan Giggs, with the likes of David Beckham, Gary Neville, and Nicky Butt lurking in the background.

Roy Keane, the man who’d take the armband from Cantona, joined from Nottingham Forest the next season. Soon Ferguson added Andy Cole. Then Ole Gunnar Salskjaer, Terry Sherringham, Japp Stam and Dwight Yorke. As Paul Scholes emerged along with Phil Neville, Ferguson had slowly turned over his original title winner into a team that would claim Champions League in 1999. With their 2-1 win over Bayern Munich in Barcelona, Ferguson’s side became United’s first European champion in 31 years.

By the time United returned to European glory, only Giggs, Scholes, Gary Neville and Wes Brown remained. By 2008, Edwin van der Saar was in goal. Rio Ferdinand, Nemanja Vidic, and Patrice Evra were the stalwarts at the back. Michael Carrick, Owen Hargreaves, Nani and Anderson were the next faces in the middle, faces built around an attack featuring Carlos Tevez, Wayne Rooney, and most importantly, Cristiano Ronaldo. Again, Ferguson had remade his squad, and again, he would be European champions, defeating Chelsea on penalty kicks in Moscow.

Since then, Ferguson’s win three more titles (and appeared in two more Champions League finals), bringing in the foundation of what’s likely to be United’s continued success. The goalkeeping legacy is in good hands with David de Gea. Ferdinand, Vidic, and Evra are still present at the back, but so are Jonny Evans, Phil Jones, Chris Smalling and Rafael. Tom Cleverley’s a regular in midfield, while United continue to amass possess talent wide with Ashley Young, Antonio Valencia, and Nani. And just like his 1999 and 2008 European champions, Ferguson has layers of depth in attack: Robin van Persie, Javier Hernandez, Danny Welback, Shinji Kagawa, and Rooney.

source: ReutersIt’s a wealth of talent that leads some to claim Ferguson’s as much a product of his environment as he is its architect, but nobody truly believes that. As much as Ferguson will be remembered as a man who had resources, he’ll be revered as a manager who used them wisely, his ability to turn over his team while still claiming 13 titles still largely left unexplained.

Along the way, he has had his pitfalls. For brief moments, Arsenal, Chelsea, and Manchester City were able to derail his dominance, the latter benefitting from United’s unfathomable collapse at the end of the 2011-12 season. That same year, United failed to make it out of Champions League’s group stage, leading people to look at Ferguson’s thin-middle preferences and wonder if an ever more midfield-centric world wasn’t passing him by.

Having run away with the Premier League in his final season, Ferguson muffled those critics, and in finally leaving, he does so on top, with a breathtaking list of accomplishments to accompany his regresses into retirement:

1986 – Replaces Ron Atikinson as manager at Manchester United.
1990 – Claims first trophy at United – the 1989-90 FA Cup.
1991 – United claims the UEFA Cup Winners’ Cup, defeating Barcelona 2-1 in Rotterdam. Later in the year, the UEFA Super Cup.
1992 – Ferguson’s first League Cup is his second piece of domestic silverware at United.
1993 – In his fourth year, Ferguson finally breaks through and wins United’s first league title in 26 years.
1994 – United do the league-FA Cup double, their first in club history.
1996 – United again do the league-FA Cup double, claiming their third title in four years.
1997 – Making it four titles in five years, Ferguson again wins back-to-back Premier Leagues.
1999 – For the third time in his tenure, Ferguson wins the league-FA Cup double, only this time, United adds the UEFA Champions League to their trophy haul, winning the “treble.” The Red Devils would go on to win the Intercontinental Cup later in a year Ferguson becomes Sir Alex, knighted by the Queen.
2000 – United wins their sixth title of the Premier League era.
2001 – For the seventh time in nine years, United are champions of England.
2002 – After initially announcing he would retire at the end of the 2001-02 season, Ferguson signs a new deal at Old Trafford. He would manage for 11 more seasons.
2003 – After finishing third the previous season, United reclaims first place, besting Arsenal by five points to claim Ferguson’s eighth title.
2004 – While relinquishing the title, United claim the fifth and final FA Cup of the Ferguson era.
2006 – For the first time in 14 years, United win the League Cup, defeating Wigan Athletic 4-0 in the final.
2007 – After a three-year drought, United win the Premier League, unseating two-time defending champions Chelsea to claim Ferguson’s ninth league title.
2008 – United defend their league tile while claiming the second European Cup of the Ferguson era, defeating Chelsea on penalty kicks in Moscow. They would go on to win the World Club Cup in December.
2009 – For the second time, Ferguson wins three-straight league titles, adding the League Cup. The Red Devils return to the Champions League final only to lose in Rome to Barcelona.
2010 – United makes it back-to-back League Cups, bringing Ferguson’s total to four.
2011 – United reclaim the league title from Chelsea and return to the Champions League final, where they are again defeated by Barcelona, this time in London.
2013 – The Red Devils collect the final trophy of the Alex Ferguson era, clinching the Premier League four rounds before the season’s finale. It’s Ferguson’s 13th league title, bringing his total major trophy haul at United to 28.

Atlanta United: From scratch to the pitch

ATLANTA, GA - JULY 07:  (L-R) MLS Atlanta owner Arthur Blank and former professional soccer player Darren Eales attend the MLS Atlanta Launch Event at SOHO on July 7, 2015 in Atlanta, Georgia.  (Photo by Paras Griffin/Getty Images for MLS Atlanta)
Photo by Paras Griffin/Getty Images for MLS Atlanta
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Darren Eales needs to get himself some game time.

Atlanta United’s president hasn’t watched his side play a league match yet, and it’s a solid 17 months since he left Tottenham Hotspur to help Arthur Blank start his MLS expansion team.

Even training Eales a touch emotional.

[ MORE: High praise for Yedlin ]

“Last Thursday in practice, I was welling up to see the guys in Atlanta training tops with Tata coaching them,” Eales told PST earlier this month. “I’ve had over two years without any games. I hadn’t experienced the highs and lows of why we’re all in this game. Come the fifth of March, it’s going to be a quite an emotional time.”

Not just for Eales, but for an Atlanta market which has proven quite rabid for the sport. United has sold almost 30,000 season tickets, a record for an expansion team.

The excitement isn’t simply a matter of a shiny new toy for sports fans in Georgia. Eales, along with technical director Carlos Bocanegra and manager Tata Martino, have constructed what, at least on paper, could be a monster.

There’s the Designated Player trio of Miguel Almiron, Josef Martinez, and Hector Villalba, young guys Miles Robinson and Andrew Carleton, MLS mainstays Michael Parkhurst and Tyrone Mears, and Chilean veteran Carlos Carmona.

ATLANTA, GA - JULY 07:  Darren Eales speaks onstage during MLS Atlanta Launch Event at SOHO on July 7, 2015 in Atlanta, Georgia.  (Photo by Paras Griffin/Getty Images for MLS Atlanta)
(Photo by Paras Griffin/Getty Images for MLS Atlanta)

None of those assets were there when Eales, 44, bought into owner Arthur Blank’s vision in September 2014. And that’s what gave the gig its allure.

[ MORE: Wenger treatment “unacceptable,” says Pep ]

“You talk about soccer being a global game, and it’s very rare you get a chance to start a whole new club from scratch,” Eales said. “To do it with an owner like Arthur Blank who is committed to the City of Atlanta, committed to the community, and committed to a winning team just made it an opportunity I couldn’t pass up.”

Eales wasn’t a stranger to America, a former Ivy League Player of the Year from his playing days at Brown University. He later went home to England where he became a director at West Bromwich Albion en route to his executive job at White Hart Lane.

So, yes, the acumen is there. And Eales’ admiration for MLS is a lot higher than many American critics suspect.

“I dealt with MLS from the other side of the fence with Robbie Keane to LA, Jermain Defoe to Toronto, and Clint Dempsey to Seattle,” Eales said. “Fresh perspective when you come from the outside, you look at how teams have built their teams and you can look at it with a fresh pair of eyes.

“The one thing I was clear on from the start, was I felt MLS, globally outside of America, it almost gets more respect from other countries than it does in America. I’ve seen that with players like Simon Dawkins. When I was at Tottenham, we loaned him to San Jose, he developed as a player and we were able to sell him off to Derby. It’s a global league, the standard of football is getting better all the time. I really felt the time was right where you could try to get players in their prime and sell it to them as career development, not a dead end.”

Blank contacted Eales, and convinced him that Atlanta United wasn’t a vanity play. The soccer team wasn’t going to be the Atlanta Falcons’ “little brother”, but a major part of the community.

Plus, time was on their side.

[ MORE: UCL Tuesday preview ]

“Building a roster, putting in the academy, building a training ground, an affiliation with the Charleston Battery, all of these things can’t happen overnight,” Eales said. “There’s been a lot of thoughts and strategy that’s gone into building the roster.”

Not to mention time zones, travel, surfaces, calendar, salary cap, the popularity of other leagues… Eales wanted to find a technical director with both positive vision and MLS wisdom. Enter Carlos Bocanegra, the USMNT captain who had started and finished his playing career in MLS before performing well overseas with Fulham, Rangers, and Rennes.

“What I didn’t want to do was come in from the Premier League and say, ‘Everything European is the way we should do it and Americans don’t know anything about soccer.’ Clearly that’s not the case and I knew that.”

NYON, SWITZERLAND - AUGUST 06:  Tottenham Hotspur director of football administration Darren Eales (R) after the UEFA Champions League play-off draw on August 6, 2010 in Nyon, Switzerland. The play-offs are played over two legs on 17/18 and 24/25 August. The ten play-off winners will join the 22 automatic entrants in the UEFA Champions League group stage, the draw for which will be held in Monaco on 26 August 26, 2010. (Photo by Fabrice Coffrini/EuroFootball/Getty Images)
(Photo by Fabrice Coffrini/EuroFootball/Getty Images)

Eales said Bocanegra is a good friend in addition to the perfect man for the job. He added that both men didn’t take long to embrace the city, and that the Falcons’ run to the Super Bowl didn’t hurt sports fever in the Peach State.

Now Georgia will turn its attention to the red and black of Atlanta United, a team brimming with talent and experience. One of the early bets for Eales and Bocanegra was that it wouldn’t be about older big names. When asked about the successes of Sebastian Giovinco at Toronto and Nicolas Lodeiro in Seattle, Eales almost bristles at the thought that the moves inspired him. Young and fast was already entrenched in his model.

[ MORE: Clattenburg’s PL time not over ]

“It’s been a long time planning,” Eales said. “We were already going down this model. Lodeiro has been fantastic in Seattle and Giovinco is by far and away the best player in the league. He was that first one where someone was taken not over 30 and it showed, despite what the Italian national team manager said at the time, you could come here, play your game and get your career back on track.

“We felt we could go even further was to get those younger players. We’ve got Miguel at 22, Hector at 22, and Josef at 23. You’ll see increasingly now it will be a chance for us as a whole league to bring in top players and get bigger and better, year on year.”

While Eales has not had the fun of match day and won’t really have that experience until March 5’s visit from the Red Bulls, he’s had fun keeping an eye on his last two Premier League clubs and their top half success.

“I have to laugh because I still talk to a lot of my colleagues back at Tottenham and when they say ‘We’re doing well since you left’ I tell them it’s all about building the foundation,” Eales said.

“Chelsea have had a great season but Tottenham with the young squad they’ve got and the manager they’ve got in Mauricio Pochettino, they are going to be titlists in the near future. And West Brom, I love West Brom. It’s a great family club and it’s really exciting to see them solid in the top half of the table. It’s a testament to the guys, Tony Pulis and the team, how they built with a plan year on year to become a solid Premier League club. They have a strategy and they stuck to it.”

So, too, does Eales and United. The roster he’s assembled and his legendary manager combine to give the look of an instant playoff contender.

Yet Eales, like MLS, is going to have to see it. The difference is that United’s president already believes it. Bring on the chills.

“Killers in the box” – Guardiola prepares to face Monaco (video)

MONACO - NOVEMBER 22:  Radamel Falcao (L) the captain of Monaco leads his team onto the field during the UEFA Champions League Group E match between AS Monaco FC and Tottenham Hotspur FC  at Louis II Stadium on November 22, 2016 in Monaco, .  (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images)
Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images
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Pep Guardiola has a lot of admiration for the latest obstacle in Manchester City’s path to the UEFA Champions League final.

The club begins its Round of 16 on Tuesday with a visit from Monaco, and Guardiola will match wits with Leonardo Jardim.

[ MORE: UCL Tuesday preview ]

The Premier League boss loves the way Monaco plays, but doesn’t adore the idea of staring them down.

From ManCity.com:

“As a spectator it’s so nice to see them. I’m really impressed how good they are.

“Their fullbacks play like wingers, the wingers play like attacking midfielders. Their strikers are fighters, Falcao, Germain, they are killers in the box. Both holding midfielders are intelligent, physical, strong. They arrive to the box.

“A complete team. The most successful team in Europe in terms of scoring goals. It’s a tough draw.”

Center back Vincent Kompany is out for the home tie vs. Monaco, and Guardiola has not decided who will start between the sticks.

The manager also praised the hiring of Marcelo Bielsa at Lille, calling the veteran manager “the best in the world”.

Scouting report gives high praise for USMNT, Newcastle back Yedlin

BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND - JANUARY 07:  A detail of the neck tattoo of Newcastle player Deandre Yedlin during The Emirates FA Cup Third Round match between Birmingham City and Newcastle United at St Andrews (stadium) on January 7, 2017 in Birmingham, England.  (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images)
Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images
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You may remember Danny Higginbotham from his time as a defender at Sunderland, Stoke City, Derby County, and Southampton, but these days he makes his dough as an analyst.

You almost certainly remember USMNT right back and speed merchant DeAndre Yedlin, though perhaps not seeing him on your television has limited your intake on his progress since leaving Tottenham Hotspur for Newcastle United.

[ MORE: Wenger treatment “unacceptable,” says Pep ]

Yedlin’s been very decent for the Magpies, making 23 appearances while providing a goal and five assists. Higginbotham has been impressed, and devoted a good portion of his prematch notes on Newcastle-Aston Villa to the American.

From Sky Sports:

Yedlin plays almost as a right winger at times. He’s the one that gives the width on that side, and he has been a standout player in recent games.

He is so quick, so he can get back with his recovery runs, but it’s what he does with the ball as well. We see him controlling the whole of the right-hand side. He has been so key for Newcastle and he gives them such an attacking threat.

Newcastle will move back atop the Championship with a win over Aston Villa on Monday, and have a five-point lead on third-place Huddersfield Town in the race for an automatic promotion place. Brighton and Hove Albion is first, two points clear of the Magpies.

Report: Clattenburg returning to Premier League

WATFORD, ENGLAND - DECEMBER 26:  Referee Mark Clattenburg during the Barclays Premier League match between Watford and Crystal Palace at Vicarage Road on December 26, 2016 in Watford, England.  (Photo by Tony Marshall/Getty Images)
Photo by Tony Marshall/Getty Images
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Four days later…

It has not been long since Mark Clattenburg last officiated a Premier League match, instead opting to take a job in Saudi Arabia.

Perhaps the move was a power play, because “Clatts” looks set to work his new job and return to his old stamping grounds for a minimum of four games.

The Sun’s Neil Ashton threw out this Tweet on Monday.

[ MORE: UCL Tuesday preview ]

All refs have detractors, but Clattenburg has a solid record in the PL and was awarded with spots officiating the finals of the UEFA Champions League, EURO 2016, and the FA Cup.

Maybe Riley and PGMOL didn’t expect Clattenburg to follow through with his threats to leave town, and it’s fair to presume he’s been rewarded handsomely.