Which U.S. men have locked up World Cup roster spots?

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I wrote last night that the United States national team has one leg and a couple of arms in Brazil. The facts scream “sitting pretty!:” Jurgen Klinsmann’s team has 10 points, about two-third of the way to the 15 or so needed. The team sits atop the six-team CONCACAF group. Three of five remaining matches are at home, where the United States is darn near unbeatable over the last decade.

So let’s just say it … the way the Seattle crowd said it last night … the United States is going to Brazil. Which most of us have been saying all along, anyway.

You know what that means? Time to begin perusing the U.S. player pool and debating who will be on the charter about this time next year.

Here are the players more or less locked in (assuming good health, of course.) As I assess it, 15 men are “in” for a roster of 23.

GOALKEEPERS: Brad Guzan, Tim Howard

Explainer: Nick Rimando is close, too, because he’s a willing No. 3. That is, he’s a veteran who can be relied on in a pinch, but still OK being the third guy. Otherwise, I think we all know this is a closed race; Spots 1 and 2 are lead-pipe locks.

DEFENDERS: DaMarcus Beasley, Matt Besler, Geoff Cameron, Timothy Chandler, Omar Gonzalez, Fabian Johnson

Explainer: You will see that a couple of center back spots remain open. Clarence Goodson is close to “lock” status for all his “been there, done that.”  So is Steve Cherundolo, although Brad Evans’ emergence, Johnson and Chandler’s ability to play right back and Cameron’s versatile capabilities along the back line all complicate the veteran’s chances of a third consecutive World Cup appearance.

MIDFIELDERS: Michael Bradley (pictured), Jermaine Jones, Graham Zusi

Explainer: There is ample opportunity here for guys like Sacha Kljestan, Stuart Holden, Danny Williams and, honestly, lots of others. Remember, Bob Bradley took eight midfielders to South Africa, and Klinsmann is likely do roughly the same.

FORWARDS: Jozy Altidore, Clint Dempsey, Herculez Gomez, Eddie Johnson

Explainer: As a contrast to the wide-open race for midfield spots, there’s not much room for elbowing into this group. Gomez has been absent in recent friendlies and qualifiers, but his versatility, his likeable personality and daily work ethic make him an ideal fit. Injuries or a precipitous loss of form would obviously open additional spots, although Dempsey and, now, Altidore would be given tons of latitude.

FIFA fines Qatar after players’ political support for Emir

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ZURICH (AP) FIFA has fined Qatar’s soccer federation after national team players breached rules against political statements by displaying T-shirts of the country’s Emir at a World Cup qualifier.

FIFA says its disciplinary panel imposed a 50,000 Swiss francs ($51,800) fine and reprimanded Qatar, the 2022 World Cup host.

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The incident happened in Doha on June 13, amid a dispute with regional rivals Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates.

Qatar’s players warmed up for a 3-2 win over South Korea wearing white T-shirts with an image of Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al-Thani to show their support for him.

FIFA says the charges related to “displaying a political image” and “political displays” by spectators.

Report: USMNT’s Arriola drawing transfer interest abroad, in MLS

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Paul Arriola’s motor was constantly running as the United States men’s national team claimed its sixth Gold Cup title, and it could drive him all the way from Club Tijuana to Europe or a prime spot on an MLS roster.

There’s a snag, though.

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Arriola is reportedly wanted by Real Salt Lake and clubs in both the Netherlands and Portugal, but the LA Galaxy has what Goal.com describes a “dubious homegrown player” claim on Arriola, who participated in a minimal of practices with the Galaxy when he was younger.

As you’ll see below, there isn’t much “homegrown” about it and, to its critics, it is peak MLS monopolized tomfoolery. Here’s how Goal describes it:

“He was already a U.S. youth national team player when he traveled the 120 miles from Chula Vista to take part in a handful of training sessions with the LA Galaxy academy and eventually the Galaxy first team.

“The Galaxy are believed to hold a homegrown player claim on Arriola, and would have the right of first refusal on making Arriola an offer if he comes to MLS. The Galaxy’s current salary-cap situation might not allow them to make a serious bid for Arriola.”

But… here’s how the Galaxy described his choosing to sign for TJ instead of a pro deal from LA in 2013:

“It’s a little disappointing,” Galaxy technical director Jovan Kirovski told MLSsoccer.com by phone on Friday. “He went through our system, we offered him a contract and he decided to move on and go somewhere else. But that’s going to happen. It’s something that has happened before, and it’s something that will happen again.”

Arriola’s response in the same article? “I thank the Galaxy for giving me a wonderful opportunity to train with their first team and be a part of their first team which really taught me a lot.” That doesn’t read as much like he “went through their system.” He played in at least one U-18 game, debuting in October 2012, did more training with TJ in December 2012, and signed for the Mexican side in May 2013.

Should that qualify him as Homegrown?

https://www.transfermarkt.com/paul-arriola/leistungsdaten/spieler/189876

Did Arriola spent significant time with LA, or is it possible the Galaxy might reap rewards from having an already established youth national teamer to practice when he was a kid? Whether you’re okay with that or not, consider that it encourages clubs to pilfer rights without actually registering or training the player.

Not to mention there is no guarantee that playing in the Netherlands or Portugal will be better for his development than MLS. Benfica or Ajax and potential action in European tournaments? Maybe. NAC Breda or Tondela? Maybe not.

Nevermind the quagmire that is American youth soccer clubs’ not earning money from transfer fees, the Arriola drama seems baseless. We don’t know the Galaxy will hold the player hostage, but they would actually be depriving MLS of a talent, as LA would theoretically get nothing should TJ sell him to a European club.

In any event, check out Arriola’s use chart from Tijuana and you’ll see why he’s valued by Bruce Arena as well as his suitors. He’s a Swiss Army Knife. Here’s hoping Tinseltown doesn’t stop him from a proper next step (assuming he’s ready to leave Liga MX).