How Roman Abramovich has fueled a ridiculous managerial merry-go-round

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Way back in February when an angry Rafa Benitez confirmed he was leaving Chelsea and condemned his then-current employers for slapping an “interm” quantifier on his job description, it started the first few chugs of the gears.

Those gears are now driving one of the most extensive managerial merry-go-rounds at the highest level of European club soccer, and that ripple effect is centered around the London giants.

In a day when managers are under constant fire and contracts mean next to nothing, the search for the ideal fit is ever present.

With Benitez’s ridiculing and ultimate departure, marking the 10th manager Roman Abramovich has seen leave his club since 2003, the wealthy Russian decided he wanted an old friend back.

Somehow, the impulsive Blues owner convinced Jose Mourinho that this time around would be different than the last, and it was written in destiny that The Happy Special One would return to the place it all broke down in September of 2007.

Mourinho’s call from Stamford Bridge was perfect timing for him, as his employers Real Madrid were just about to tell him he had overstayed his welcome with three straight Champions League semifinal disappointments.

Now it’s Los Blancos without a leader, although Carlo Ancelotti, somewhat unjustly fired by Abramovich in 2012, seems to be the frontrunner for the job. The Frenchman desires the Madrid job greatly, having led Paris Saint-Germain to their first Ligue 1 title 19 years. Ancelotti would be a great hire for Madrid, having proven himself at the highest level multiple times, including at Chelsea despite Abramovich’s failure to see it.

It appears PSG are looking to secure a replacement for Ancelotti before releasing him to pursue a job in Spain, and the frontrunner looks to be Guus Hiddink of Anzhi Makhachkala.

Hiddink, caretaker manager in 2009 after Abramovich sacked Luis Felipe Scolari, has also made the rounds at the highest level. The 66-year-old Dutchman has made a name for himself not just at the club level, but also at the international level with Australia, Russia, and Turkey.

As top clubs across Europe swap managers, Rafa Benitez has already settled in nicely at Napoli. He largely quieted his haters at Chelsea with success down the stretch of the season, maybe even an odd but poignant parting shot at those who wished him to leave.

It’s not just the top teams that are suddenly searching for new managers. This is the way of the sport these days. England last year saw 63 teams up and down its four professional leagues make a managerial change last season at some point. Sixty-three!!! 43 of those were sacked and 20 resigned from their positions. Thus is the culture of the job in today’s game.

At the top though, as Roman Abramovich has developed a reputation for an itchy trigger finger, he’s unintentionally provided a crop of top managers to the rest of Europe’s elite. Not only that, but he’s caused a chain reaction for this summer transfer window that’s seen movement across the board, and it certainly hasn’t ended just yet.

It seems to be working out quite well for many of the names that leave Stamford Bridge. Despite that, Jose Mourinho will obviously be hoping he doesn’t become another name on the Abramovich axe list…again.

Jurgen Klopp announced as new Liverpool manager

Jurgen Klopp, Liverpool FC
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Enough with the speculation and reports already, because it’s finally officially official: Jurgen Klopp has been appointed the newest manager of Liverpool Football Club, the Merseyside club announced on Thursday.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s PL coverage ]

Klopp will be unveiled to the world at an introductory press conference at Anfield on Friday.

According to early reports, Klopp’s three-year contract could pay him as much as $10 million per season.

[ QUOTE KING: Top 10 “Klopp-isms” from his time at Dortmund ]

The 48-year-old German has been out of work since stepping down at Bundesliga side Borussia Dortmund following a seventh-place finish to the 2014-15 season. Klopp’s seven seasons in charge of Dortmund weren’t without success and silverware, though, as he led Der BVB to back-to-back league titles in 2011 and 2012, a German Cup triumph in 2012 and a UEFA Champions League final appearance in 2013.

PST’s Joe Prince-Wright will be at Anfield on Friday for Klopp’s unveiling, so be sure to follow JPW on Twitter and check back to PST for wall-to-wall coverage of Klopp’s first press conference as Liverpool manager.

Mourinho “working like never before” to turn Chelsea around

Jose Mourinho, Chelsea FC
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Jose Mourinho got the dreaded much-needed vote of confidence from Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich last weekend, seemingly giving the Portuguese manager a temporary stay of execution despite the Blues’ worst start to a season in 37 years.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s PL coverage ]

Speaking this week, Mourinho has revealed that while he’s thankful to have been kept on at the club for which he regularly professes his love, he still thinks it was no-brainer for Abramovich. In other words, Mourinho’s not backing down from his incredible, seven-minute rant to one question following Saturday’s defeat to Southampton.

Mourinho, on what he’s doing to turn Chelsea around — quotes from the Guardian:

“It shows the confidence of Abramovich in the manager who has won three Premier League titles with this club. I thank him and I keep working.

“What’s going on? I do not know. The results with Chelsea at the moment have been really bad. I cannot hide that reality, and I don’t want to. And I struggle to find an explanation. But I assure you: I’m working like never before and we will come out of this. And there is also the Champions League that we will not neglect, for certain.”

What did you expect from Mourinho? Well, you know, I should probably be fired, but thanks to Mr. Abramovich for not realizing this and keeping me employed? It’s simultaneously interesting and the least surprising thing ever, though, that Mourinho claims to not know what’s wrong with Chelsea at the moment. Of course he has a theory (or five), and of course he’s “working like never before” to correct it.

[ MORE: Ozil, Coquelin say Arsenal can win the title this season ]

The most fascinating thing about Chelsea’s sluggish start to the season is to see, hear and read Mourinho speaking from a position of powerlessness. Always the clever one, the one dictating where the discussion goes, the one in charge of every press interaction, Saturday’s rant felt like watching a desperate Mourinho grasping for anything by which to pull himself back up.