What Jozy Altidore can learn from Fernando Torres


Jozy Altidore and Fernando Torres are essentially two peas from the same striker pod.

Both are physical specimens who are highly scrutinized, criticized and (at times) undervalued by the footballing world. But perhaps the closest bond that the two players enjoy is that they are both highly instinctual strikers. And because of this trait, Jozy – six years Fernando’s minor – can learn a lot from the Spanish marksman.

Torres rose to prominance at his childhood club, Atletico Madrid, where he made his debut at age 17 before earning the captain’s armband two years later. He scored double-digit goals every season at Atleti but it was not until he arrived at Liverpool that he truly exploded.

In his first season at Anfield, Torres utilized his blazing speed, power and finishing ability to net 24 league goals and 31 in all competitions. It seemed everytime Torres touched the ball, he scored. The majority of his goals came in one of two ways. Either he would find a seam, burst through it, and strike the entry pass first time or he would drift wide, collect the ball, take a quick touch inside and release a rocket into the top corner.

The one constant was that most goals Torres scored were on pure impulse, as if his mind could not catch up with his body.

It was not until he moved to Chelsea in January 2011 that the combination of niggly injuries and a 50M weight on his shoulders slowed him down, forcing him to over-think exactly what he was doing. The rest is history – Torres fell headfirst into a scoring abyss scoring a mere 15 goals in 82 Premier League competitions since arriving at Stamford Bridge.

And while many will site Torres’ loss of confidence as a major reason for his drought, that only happened when he let thought overtake instinct.

Two weeks ago, all the rage in the U.S. was over the scoring drought of Jozy Altidore for not having scored a national team goal from open play in nearly two years.

Was Jozy’s slump as pronounced as Torres’?

No. After all, he did manage a haul of 23 goals in 21 Eredivisie matches with AZ this season. The situation was nevertheless disconcerting, both for the striker and the American soccer fans.

The problem for Jozy was one of circumstances. As the U.S.’s only pure striker the true scoring onus fell squarely on the New Jersey native’s shoulders. Sure, Clint Dempsey would be there to help score goals. But at the end of the day, Jozy was well aware that it was the striker – not the attacking midfielder or second striker or winger or however one wishes to classify Deuce’s position – that consistently needed to make the score sheet.

So, he overcompensated. Rather than chasing down defenders and getting into the box to finish crosses, Jozy tried to do too much and dropped deep looking to get the ball on his foot. He tried to create when – no offense to Altidore – he is not a creator.

He is a finisher. A one-touch, no-nonsense finisher.

This was the skill that, like Torres, helped Jozy rise to prominence at the New York Red Bulls. This was the skill that earned him a transfer out of a terrible situation at Villareal and into a brilliant one at AZ. And this was the skill that, at AZ, had resulted in the lion’s share of his 38 league goals over two seasons.

So two weeks ago, with the drought hanging over his head, it was all on the line for Jozy. After a dreadful friendly match against Belgium where he was subbed out at half-time, he needed to rediscover himself if the U.S. was to achieve their dreams of making it to Brazil 2014.

And rediscover himself, he did, scoring four goals in four matches — all of which were one-time, instinctual finishes.

When Jozy works hard off the ball and gets himself into the box, this is the kind of danger he possesses. The same danger that Fernando Torres once used to terrorize opponents on the Kop. And the kind of danger that will give opposing defenders nightmares in Brazil.

Klopp’s Liverpool squad enthusiasm: “Everything is there”

LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 09:  Jurgen Klopp is unveiled as the new manager of Liverpool FC during a press conference at Anfield on October 9, 2015 in Liverpool, England.  (Photo by Alex Livesey/Getty Images)
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It isn’t Dortmund, but that’s a good thing for Liverpool.

Our own Joe Prince-Wright was on the scene for Jurgen Klopp’s unveiling as the latest Reds manager, and the 48-year-old German had a lot to say.

Perhaps most poignant for Liverpool fans are Klopp’s words on the talent he inherits from Brendan Rodgers. Sure there are quips that will hit the headlines, but how about Klopp’s assertion that success shouldn’t take nearly as long as his dramatic work at BVB.

From JPW on Merseyside:

“We did in Dortmund what we had to do, to improve the players, to work for a common idea of play. That is what we did and its the same thing we want to do here. They are not the same players of course,” Klopp told NBC Sports ProSoccerTalk. “These players from Liverpool are better, more experienced in some ways and younger in other cases. Everything is okay, I am here. I am not here only because LFC was calling. I believe in the potential of this team. Four or five strikers you can work with when they are not injured, midfielders is really good, defenders experienced and very young, goalkeeper is really good. Everything is there.”

Everything. A powerful word and one that doesn’t get lost in translation. Liverpool has a batch of world class talent, and Klopp’s is anxious to organize it in world class fashion. Strap in, Anfield.

CONCACAF Cup preview: Ultimate guide to USMNT vs Mexico

Beasley, and other US veterans, have been asked to take the young guys under their wing.
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So here we go: the biggest rivalry in U.S. Soccer, the one that sends fans racing for the stadia for a glimpse of history.

It’s the U.S. and Mexico for the right to go to the 2017 Confederations Cup in Russia, and it will play out at the Rose Bowl on Saturday night.

National pride is on the line, and national jobs may rightly be in jeopardy. Let’s swing through our coverage, and what’s at stake in just over 24 hours time.

The Battles

Who is the key to Saturday’s match? Is it Michael Bradley? Fabian Johnson? Andres Guardado? Will Klinsmann opt for players with Liga MX experience, stay Euro Heavy, or appease the domestic set? Read more here.

The XI

So how will Klinsmann line ’em up? JPW has his preference, some options, and a prediction of what the manager will do.

The history

What are the chances this one finds its way into the upper echelon of matches in the Mexico/U.S. rivalry? This is the company it could join.

Klinsmann’s future

The folks in the anti-Klinsmann brigade seethe with pure detestation of the USMNT boss. Any quote from him is self-serving and dishonest, any success accidental. Beat Germany or the Netherlands in friendlies on the road? Coincidental and Unimportant. Lose a friendly to Brazil? The worst thing ever.

[ MORE: The case for firing Klinsmann after a loss ]

So this match, being meaningful and testing his unbeaten mark vs Mexico, is going to be a clarion call for U.S. Soccer fans. Barring a cataclysmic loss in horrific blowout fashion, he won’t be canned. But a win will be validation for his supporters while a loss would cue a genuine hot seat. And for his detractors, already foaming at the mouth from the words of icon Landon Donovan? Kablammo.