Brazil Soccer Confed Cup Protests

FIFA denies Confederations Cup will be cancelled as protests intensify


This morning FIFA have responded to various reports suggesting that the Confederations Cup currently going on in Brazil, will be abandoned after violent riots intensified over the last 24 hours across the South American country.

Soccer’s world governing body have said the tournament will not be abandoned after violent protests have continued to erupt over the past 24 hours.

Last night in Sao Paulo one protestor was killed after being hit by a car driven into a crowd. And CBN radio and Estado de Sao Paulo have been suggesting that the tournament could be cancelled as severe demonstrations  and unrest continue.

It was estimated that over 1 million protestors took to the streets on Thursday night, as people hit out at the government over corruption, rising prices and a lack of investment in services for the public.

Over 80 cities have now seen protests and some of the teams competing in the Confederations Cup have aired their unease at the violent anti-government demonstrations.

But when will the protests end?

It doesn’t seem like anytime soon. Police have clashed with the crowds but the number of protestors continues to grow and they certainly have the upper hand on the authorities. Originally the protests began after the government announced a price hike for bus and metro services in Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. Now it has become much more than that.

Several soccer players have come out in support of the protestors, with Brazilian internationals David Luiz and Lucas Leiva leading the way.

Although they both called for peaceful protests, the nature of the demonstrations against the Brazilian government are becoming more violent.

While Chelsea defender David Luiz had this to say, as Brazil booked their place in the semifinals of the tournament, and face Italy on Saturday afternoon in their final group game.

The people have the right to express their opinions and to protest when they are not happy with what is happening in their country. That’s the only way to call attention to what is wrong. I don’t live in Brazil, but I love my country. The Brazilians love their country and that’s why these protests are happening.

But when should FIFA step in and move the teams away from an unstable environment which is set to get worse before it gets better? That is a difficult conundrum to unravel.

World soccer’s governing body should not ignore the real issues that are affecting the people of Brazil. But it can’t help the situation tangibly.

One banner during Spain’s 10-0 demolition of Tahiti at the Maracana Stadium on Thursday read, “We want hospitals and schools in FIFA standards.”

Brazilians are upset that their government is spending over $16 billion on stadiums and infrastructure for a sporting event, yet other areas of the nation are being left woefully underfunded and neglected.

Like I said, FIFA can’t do much about it. But given the trouble and unrest and with stadium projects still being completed in plenty of cities, should the 2014 World Cup happen in Brazil next summer?

It has to.

Now the stadiums are being built and the money has been spent by the government, there is no turning back.

But maybe FIFA wishes there was, after the Confederations Cup regurgitated the huge number of social and political issues troubling the Brazilian people, government and their nation.

But for now, let the games continue.

Ferguson still being asked about Moyes: “We chose a good football man”

David Moyes Alex Ferguson
AP Photo/Martin Rickett/PA
Leave a comment

In some ways absence makes the heart grow fonder, but it seems Sir Alex Ferguson‘s life after Manchester United has been filled with second guessing.

Whether the sales of Paul Pogba and Gerard Pique or the appointment of David Moyes, “Fergie” apparently can’t rest on his title-winning laurels.

[ MORE: Tax evasion charges dropped against Messi, but not his father ]

One thing that seems to bug him more than anything, though, is the idea that he hand-picked David Moyes to be his successor, and should be responsible for his failings.

In a new documentary, Ferguson both defends the appointment of Moyes and explains the process behind his choice.

From the BBC:

“I don’t think we made a mistake at all. I think we chose a good football man,” Ferguson says. “Unfortunately it didn’t work for David.

“Jose Mourinho was going back to Chelsea, Carlo Ancelotti was going to Real Madrid, Jurgen Klopp had signed a contract with Dortmund, Louis Van Gaal was staying with Holland for the World Cup.”

The article also makes another key point, according to Ferguson: the manager claims he only gave United a few months notice that he’d be stepping down. That certainly didn’t provide a lot of lead time to secure a big boss.

What do you make it of it? If your answer is, “When can we stop talking about Moyes and United?” I tend to be with you, but it’s a talking point.

Tax evasion charges against Messi dropped; Case vs father continues

FILE - In this Sept. 27, 2013 file photo, Barcelona F.C. star Lionel Messi, left, arrives at a court to answer questions in a tax fraud case in Gava, near Barcelona, Spain. Barcelona prosecutors are calling for the arrest of Messi's father in a tax fraud case. Prosecutors have cleared Messi of wrongdoing but are seeking an 18-month prison sentence for his father, Jorge Horacio Messi, for allegedly defrauding Spain's tax office of 4 million euros ($4.5 million) in unpaid taxes from 2007-09. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti, File)
AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti
Leave a comment

Lionel Messi will not face charges that he and his father defrauded the government in millions of unpaid taxes, though his father is not so lucky.

Messi’s father, Jorge, could face 18 months in jail and an approximate $2.25 million fine despite a voluntary payment of $5.5 million in 2013 to “correct” the missed taxes.

[ WATCH: Hilarious spoof pegs Messi, Ronaldo as “Friends” ]

The Barcleona star had plead ignorance to the charges, something that failed to impress prosecutors. But, it apparently worked out in his favor on Tuesday.

From the BBC:

Prosecutors allege that Jorge avoiding paying tax on his son’s earnings by using offshore companies in Belize and Uruguay between 2007 and 2009.

Messi’s lawyers argued that the player had “never devoted a minute of his life to reading, studying or analysing” the contracts, El Pais newspaper reported.