Bocanegra head shot

Amid allocation fun, one destination makes sense for Carlos Bocanegra’s return


Get ready for some Allocation Order fun, because if Carlos Bocanegra is bound for Major League Soccer, it unlikely Toronto FC will be his final destination.

The Reds hold the first spot on the re-entry list by virtue of their league-worst finish in 2012. But for a player like Bocanegra – having ties elsewhere in the States, a history with another franchise, and likely coming home to close out his professional career – Toronto makes no sense.

It wouldn’t be surprising if Bocanegra’s situation starts to mirror Brian McBride’s, a player whose return from England came with the condition he wind up with the Chicago Fire. Toronto eventually worked out a deal, traded their pick’s rights to the Fire (for Chad Barrett and change), thus getting something out of the unfortunate situation. With Bocanegra, it could happen again.

There have, however, been whispers of an agreement between Toronto and Portland stemming back to this spring’s ill-fated Mix Diskerud pursuit. That agreement, said to be born out of the trade that sent Ryan Johnson to Portland, would have TFC pass on a player of Portland’s liking, allowing the Timbers to select the player with the number two pick acquired from Chivas USA.

Beyond that National Enquirer stuff, it’s worth asking the extent to which Bocanegra would fit with Toronto. For a TFC team that has Doneil Henry, Darren O’Dea pushed to left back, and are looking to firm up a deal for Birmingham City loanee Steven Caldwell, does a commitment to Bocanegra even make sense? Without knowing the money that’d be committed to the former Fire star, it’s impossible to say, but there may be some justification to TFC either trading or passing on the pick.

That leaves Portland at number two and Seattle at number three. With the Timbers’ central defense infirmary, it’s difficult to see them passing on Bocanegra, while Seattle may look to make room for the former UCLA man, possibly at the expense of Jhon Kennedy Hurtado.

Still, you wonder if a situation closer to home might make sense for Bocanegra, with a team that prizes its veterans looking to add a player who would help compensate for an impending loss. At this point in his career, Bocanegra may covet a chance to sacrifice a more lucrative contract in exchange for a chance to play for the LA Galaxy.

And with Omar Gonzalez iffy to be on the roster come 2014, the situation makes sense from LA’s point of view. The veteran would start to Gonzalez’s left for the remainder of this season, giving Bruce Arena a chance to move A.J. DeLaGarza out right and Sean Franklin into midfield. Come 2014, Bocanegra and A.J. DeLaGarza would be the first choices in the middle.
Would all the be worth it in exchange for, say, Michael Stephens? At this point in the season, Toronto’s getting close to a something-or-nothing situation with that pick.

It’s all speculation, but in the wake of what we saw transpire with McBride, it’s important to remember: Some players have a way of landing where they want. Bocanegra is a California guy who could be flexible to LA’s salary cap constraints, while the Galaxy are always looking for the next veteran presence that can help line the trophy cabinet.

Regardless, expect more Allocation Order fun if Carlos Bocanegra agrees to come back to Major League Soccer.

Ferguson still being asked about Moyes: “We chose a good football man”

David Moyes Alex Ferguson
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In some ways absence makes the heart grow fonder, but it seems Sir Alex Ferguson‘s life after Manchester United has been filled with second guessing.

Whether the sales of Paul Pogba and Gerard Pique or the appointment of David Moyes, “Fergie” apparently can’t rest on his title-winning laurels.

[ MORE: Tax evasion charges dropped against Messi, but not his father ]

One thing that seems to bug him more than anything, though, is the idea that he hand-picked David Moyes to be his successor, and should be responsible for his failings.

In a new documentary, Ferguson both defends the appointment of Moyes and explains the process behind his choice.

From the BBC:

“I don’t think we made a mistake at all. I think we chose a good football man,” Ferguson says. “Unfortunately it didn’t work for David.

“Jose Mourinho was going back to Chelsea, Carlo Ancelotti was going to Real Madrid, Jurgen Klopp had signed a contract with Dortmund, Louis Van Gaal was staying with Holland for the World Cup.”

The article also makes another key point, according to Ferguson: the manager claims he only gave United a few months notice that he’d be stepping down. That certainly didn’t provide a lot of lead time to secure a big boss.

What do you make it of it? If your answer is, “When can we stop talking about Moyes and United?” I tend to be with you, but it’s a talking point.

Tax evasion charges against Messi dropped; Case vs father continues

FILE - In this Sept. 27, 2013 file photo, Barcelona F.C. star Lionel Messi, left, arrives at a court to answer questions in a tax fraud case in Gava, near Barcelona, Spain. Barcelona prosecutors are calling for the arrest of Messi's father in a tax fraud case. Prosecutors have cleared Messi of wrongdoing but are seeking an 18-month prison sentence for his father, Jorge Horacio Messi, for allegedly defrauding Spain's tax office of 4 million euros ($4.5 million) in unpaid taxes from 2007-09. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti, File)
AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti
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Lionel Messi will not face charges that he and his father defrauded the government in millions of unpaid taxes, though his father is not so lucky.

Messi’s father, Jorge, could face 18 months in jail and an approximate $2.25 million fine despite a voluntary payment of $5.5 million in 2013 to “correct” the missed taxes.

[ WATCH: Hilarious spoof pegs Messi, Ronaldo as “Friends” ]

The Barcleona star had plead ignorance to the charges, something that failed to impress prosecutors. But, it apparently worked out in his favor on Tuesday.

From the BBC:

Prosecutors allege that Jorge avoiding paying tax on his son’s earnings by using offshore companies in Belize and Uruguay between 2007 and 2009.

Messi’s lawyers argued that the player had “never devoted a minute of his life to reading, studying or analysing” the contracts, El Pais newspaper reported.