Low attendance figures continue at U-20 World Cup, but why?

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As the knockout stages of the Under-20 World Cup begins in Turkey today, one factor is hugely noticeable as the world’s top young talent continue to square off.

Where are all the fans?

Game after game the attendances seem to have got worse, with only the Turkish U-20 team able to draw decent crowds. Other nations such as Iraq and Egypt have had sizable followings, given their closeness geographically, but that is about as good as it gets.

Trying to analyze why the crowd numbers are so low isn’t easy. But one aspect sticks out more than most.

Location, location, location.

Despite being just within the boundaries of Europe, Turkey sits thousands of miles away from the huge conurbations of London, Paris, Western Germany and the larger cities in Spain, Italy and central Europe.

Those are the regions soccer fans inhabit more readily than any other areas. They have more disposable income and are willing to travel to watch soccer games, however with the European championships occurring in Poland and Ukraine last time out, European soccer fans may have had enough of traveling so far out East to cheer on their nations.

FIFA have aired their displeasure at the low attendances with the Chairman of the Organizing Committee, Jim Boyce, speaking of the disappointing figures.

“Despite the Local Organizing Committee’s excellent event preparation, I am nevertheless very disappointed by the match attendance figures,” Boyce said. “This tournament is a wonderful chance for Turkey, but the low number of spectators currently detracts from this opportunity.”

But one other huge factor that has hampered crowd figures across Turkey, is the large anti-government protest that erupted in the weeks leading up to the U-20 World Cup.

(MORE: USA begin U-20 World Cup quest vs. Spain)

For me, that is a huge reason why fans are not attending the tournament. Couple that with the current unrest in the region as a whole — more violent outbreaks in Syria, Egypt and Iraq have broken out during the event — and many supporters from the Western world have been put off. Turkey’s long-term aim to get into the EU seems to have vanished, and having failures at  tournaments such as this will impact the country’s ability to attract other high profile sporting events in the future.

During the opening 12 games of the tournament, the average attendance was a mere 4,828 spectators per game, which was in fact the lowest figures since the U-20 World Cup began in 1977.

On the eve of the tournament on June 20, just 300,000 tickets were sold. 1.3 million were available, meaning over 75% of tickets went unsold. That is remarkable.

(MORE: U.S. U-20 squad crashes out of U-20 World Cup after shellacking by Ghana)

People are readily citing the ‘Gezi effect’ for the lack of spectators, following the lengthy protests sparked off across the country due to the governments plans to build shops and other modern buildings in Istanbul’s Taksim Square. The decision to build on such a sacred spot, which dates way back to the Ottoman Empire, has since been delayed. But unrest remains and spectator numbers have been effected.

As we’ve discussed many other issues come into play, you can’t solely blame anti-government protests for poor attendance.

Regardless, you can watch the play get back underway today, as Mexico take on Spain in their tough last-16 clash at 10:45am ET this morning, live on ESPNU, ESPN3.com and ESPN Deportes in North America.

Hopefully it isn’t in another empty stadium. But, sadly, it probably will be.

Ancelotti rules himself out of Liverpool job

Carlo Ancelotti, Real Madrid CF
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Carlo Ancelotti will not be the next manager of Liverpool, if you’re not so cynical that you don’t believe Mr. Ancelotti himself, that is.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s PL coverage ]

Ancelotti, who this summer was fired one season after winning the UEFA Champions League at Real Madrid, has been widely reported a top-two candidate for the Premier League club’s vacant managerial position ever since Brendan Rodgers was fired on Sunday.

While he may very well have been one of Liverpool’s top choices, to hear Ancelotti tell it, he’s not interested in taking the job, nor any other job anywhere in the world this year.

[ MORE: “Super computer” predicts final Premier League standings ]

Ancelotti, speaking at the National History Museum in London on Tuesday — quotes from the Guardian:

“I enjoy my time now but, of course, I want to come back to manage – to work – because it is my passion. I want to take my time to rest, but next season I am ready.”

“Why not [return to Paris Saint-Germain]? I have very good memories of Paris, PSG, I have good relations with everyone, with Nasser [al-Khelaifi, the PSG president].

“But I’m thinking about other things and PSG has a very good coach in Laurent Blanc. I hope he will continue and shine in the Champions League.”

Of course, with Jurgen Klopp reportedly all but officially announced as Liverpool’s new manager, Ancelotti is probably doing two things by ruling himself out until next season: 1) saving a bit of face, given that he was pretty clearly not Liverpool’s first-choice candidate; 2) letting every Ancelotti-sized club know that he’ll be available come this spring and summer, just in case they’re considering firing their current manager and need a bit of assurance an elite candidate will be available.

[ MORE: Klopp expected to be named new Liverpool manager this week ]

For instance, the likes of Chelsea, Manchester City, PSG and Juventus immediately come to mind. A manager of Ancelotti’s quality will always have options and offers, and that’s something he clearly understands. Ancelotti has earned the right to enjoy a year-long sabbatical and to be picky when choosing his next job.

Report: FIFA provisionally suspends Sepp Blatter

Sepp Blatter, FIFA president

Sepp Blatter could, finally, be frozen out by FIFA.

The 17-year leader of world soccer’s governing body has reportedly been suspended for 90 days after FIFA’s ethics committee met on Wednesday to discuss allegations against both Blatter and his close ally Michel Platini.

[ MORE: Chung to sue Blatter ]

Reports suggest that the decision to suspend the Swiss official still needs to be formally ratified by the adjudicatory chamber of the ethics committee, but it is highly likely that Blatter will be suspended until January 2016.

Blatter, 79, has been at FIFA for over 40 years but under his stewardship the organization has been riddled with allegations of corruption as current investigations from both the U.S. and Swiss authorities continue. The longtime FIFA official is suspected of “criminal mismanagement or misappropriation” by the Swiss authorities after a payment of over $1.9 million is linked to Blatter and the current president of UEFA, and FIFA presidential candidate, Platini.

[ MORE: How will USA line up vs. Mexico? ]

Klaus Stoehlker, who formerly advised Blatter, has told Sky News that the ethics committee “made the ruling pending further investigations by the Swiss attorney general” and the verdict was “pending”  but that “no negative finding had been made against the head of world football’s governing body.” It is believed that the 90-day suspension is the maximum amount of time the ethics committee can suspend any individuals while an investigation is ongoing.

It has been reported that the head of FIFA’s ethics committee, Judge Hans Joachim-Eckert, has told Blatter of his suspension.

The leader of FIFA, who will stand down following the next presidential elections on Feb. 26, 2016, has been defiant in recent weeks despite growing pressure from corporate sponsors of FIFA for him to resign.

On Wednesday he spoke out and denied he will quit, while at the Leaders’ in Sport Summit in London another presidential candidate ,Chung Mong-joon, declared that he will sue Blatter for “at least $100 million” and believes the FIFA president and his “cronies” are deliberately sabotaging his own presidential campaign.