Gerard Deulofeu’s background and how he fits in at Everton

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Yesterday Everton announced what may prove to be their most important signing of the season, penning Barcelona starlet Gerard Deulofeu (pronounced ‘dell-off-AY-oo’) to a single season loan deal.

Americans might recall the 19 year old from the two goals he scored during Spain’s 4-1 throttling of the U.S. during the U-20 World Cup this past June. But for those who missed it, or simply want to avoid recalling the experience, here’s a bit more background on Everton’s new toy.

Born in Girona, Catalonia, Deulofeu joined La Masia in 2003 at the age of nine. It was there that Deulofeu was developed to follow in the footsteps of Xavi and Iniesta with notable control, vision and discipline.

Deulofeu soon grew into La Masia’s most talented youth product and he’s since gone on to represent Spain at U16, U17, U19, and, most recently at the U21 level where he has netted three times in seven matches. Deulofeu was a key player in Spain’s U-19 European Football Championships, where he participated in 2011 as a 17 year old and in 2012 as an 18 year old, when he was named the tournament’s best player.

Last season Deulofeu was the star of Barcelona’s B team, which competes in La Segunda, Spain’s second division. It was there that Deulofeu bagged 18 goals, good for fourth highest total in the division. Based on this success, Barca penned the 19 year old to a new contract that runs through 2017.

While poised to one day star on the Barcelona’s first team, Tito Vilanova & Company decided that with the arrival of Neymar into an already stacked attack, Deulofeu’s time at Camp Nou has not yet arrived. Determined not to turn off a young player who won’t be seeing consistent first-team playing time (perhaps they’ve learned from the Thiago Alcantara mess), Barcelona chose to send Deulofeu to Merseyside for some reps (both mental and physical).

Despite his youth, there is little doubt that Deulofeu will make a major impact at Goodison Park. A forward who can lead the line or come in from the left side, Deulofeu possesses incredible skill and confidence on the ball.

He is a fearless dribbler, one who is willing to take on multiple opponents at any given time and who will use a combination of clever moves and blistering pace to leave defenders in the dust. Unflappable under pressure, Deulofeu is equally cool in front of net, typically opting for a low placement over power.

By signing Deulofeu and Arouna Kone, the Toffees now have multiple options up top.

Assuming Roberto Martinez opts for his favored 4-3-3 formation, only Kevin Mirallas has a guaranteed starting spot, which will likely be on the right wing. The striker spot is the most difficult to predict but Kone is the most likely to get the nod with Deulofeu, Nikica Jelavic and Victor Anichebe all competing for time.

Steven Pienaar will have a starting role on the left side of the field but whether that’s as the left midfielder or the left winger, remains to be seen. If the South African is dropped back into midfield, Deulofeu could start on the wing, although Kone could also be used wide left if Martinez opts for Jelavic or Anichebe in the role of striker. Ross Barkley is yet another option who will factor in on either wing.

Regardless of how Martinez deploys his troops one thing is certain, the talent of Deulofeu makes Everton a side that could be a nightmare for opposing defenses.

Chinese clubs to pay 100% tax on foreign transfers

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The days of Chinese Super League sides spending eye-popping figures on a handful of international superstars are over — either that, or those figures are about to double — for now, at least.

[ MORE: Oscar given 8-game ban for petulant display in China ]

China’s Football Association announced Thursday that, effective immediately, any foreign player signed for a fee exceeding $6.63 million would be subject to a 100-percent tax on top of the fee paid to acquire the player. The tax will remain in effect until the end of China’s ongoing transfer window, July 14. The tax will also apply to Chinese players signed for a fee exceeding $3 million.

It’s Chinese authorities’ latest attempt to prevent big spending by CSL clubs, which has in every instance been detrimental to the development of young Chinese players making their way through the academy system. The taxed money will then be reinvested in “youth training, construction of public sporting facilities and scientific progress in football development,” according to a statement by the CFA.

Just last week, China was eliminated from contention to qualify for next summer’s World Cup in Russia. The only time China has ever qualified for the World Cup was in 2002.

Young Englishman Oxford goes abroad, to Gladbach, on loan

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MOENCHENGLADBACH, Germany (AP) Borussia Moenchengladbach has signed English central defender Reece Oxford on loan for the season from Premier League club West Ham.

Gladbach sporting director Max Eberl says “Oxford has gone through all the England youth teams and is one of the biggest defensive talents in Britain.”

The 18-year-old Oxford, who spent the second half of last season on loan at second-division club Reading, is Gladbach’s fifth arrival of the off-season.

Qatar stadium safety concerns again raised by death investigation

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An investigation into why a British man fell to his death on a building site for the 2022 Qatar soccer World Cup has raised concerns about stadium roof safety.

World Cup organizers on Thursday released partial findings of an assessment of the accident at the Khalifa International Stadium, but said the full report cannot be released while local authorities continue their own investigation. It is one of two work-related deaths detailed in Qatar’s latest welfare report on preparations for the 2022 soccer tournament, which currently involves 12,367 workers on eight construction sites.

The 40-year-old British man fell 39 meters in January after one end of the roof catwalk he was installing dropped and a safety rope snapped.

“During the course of the investigation, the team had raised concerns with the method of installation of the raised catwalk system,” the welfare report from Qatar’s World Cup organizers stated. “This required further investigation regarding the method itself and the supervision skills of the specialist contractor staff.”

It has led to “corrective and preventative actions” being implemented by the contractor, a joint venture between Belgian and Qatari firms, along with safety checks across all stadium sites, the report said.

“These included a review of all working-at-height activities across all SC projects, an enhanced process when reviewing specialist activities within construction sites, and a detailed review of all roof and gantry designs,” the Supreme Committee overseeing stadium projects added.

The British man is the only European working on Qatar stadiums to have died in a country relying on a low-paid migrant workforce from south Asia to prepare for the first World Cup in the Middle East. Six non-work related deaths have been announced by organizers, with most suffering from heart or breathing problems.

Hassan Al Thawadi, the supreme committee’s secretary general, said medical staff are trying to raise awareness of the “importance of healthy lifestyles” by evaluating diets and identifying health issues, including hypertension and diabetes. Cooling helmets have also been developed in an attempt to make it safer for workers on outdoor sites during the searing summer heat.

World Cup preparations have been dogged by concerns about the welfare of workers since the natural gas-rich Gulf nation won the FIFA vote in 2010. Mounting international pressure led to Qatar raising living standards and worker rights. Inspections led to three contractors being blacklisted and 14 entities “demobilized” from projects for failing to tackle welfare issues, the World Cup report reveals.

“There is still work to be done to ensure our workers’ welfare standards continue to have a tangible impact on the ground and we are comprehensive in our attempts to tackle the myriad of issues facing migrant workers across the SC program,” Khalid Al-Kubaisi, who oversees worker welfare at the Supreme Committee, said in a statement.

The report has been released as Qatar is gripped by a diplomatic crisis that has seen it isolated in the region. Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain cut ties with Qatar earlier this month and blocked air, sea and land traffic over its support for Islamist groups and ties with Iran. Qatar denies the charges and says the allegations are politically motivated.

Official (finally): Salah completes move from Roma to Liverpool

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It was the summer’s first transfer rumor-turned-real-story-turned-never-ending-saga that seemed to refuse to cross the finish line, but it’s finally come to pass: Mohamed Salah is a Liverpool player.

Salah’s move from Roma to Liverpool took so long to complete that the club’s poor social-media manager probably never wants to read the words “Announce Salah” for the rest of his/her life.

The deal will cost Liverpool something in the neighborhood of $50 million — a new Liverpool club record — and completes the utterly terrifying attacking quartet Jurgen Klopp can’t wait to unleash on the Premier League come August — Salah on one side, Sadio Mane opposite, Philippe Coutinho in the middle, and Roberto Firmino at striker. Salah, by the way, will take over Firmino’s no. 11 shirt, with the Brazilian switching to no. 9.