The balance between success in the Europa League and PL has been difficult for the Dane to juggle.

Swansea City manager Michael Laudrup deserves big time credit

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Michael Laudrup deserves credit, big time credit.

After delivering Swansea City their first major trophy in the club’s 100 year history this past spring, journos across the globe (myself included) pegged him to leave the Liberty Stadium for a more prestigious throne.

It was a move he seemed destined to make.

After all, three of his previous four club managerial appointments (Getafe, Spartak Moscow, Mallorca) had been one-and-dones. Only his first managerial stint, at boyhood club Brøndby, extended beyond one season.

He moved on for a variety of reasons, but mainly because of ambition and an inability to deal with boards, chairmen and owners who didn’t give him what he wanted. The later, of course, was largely a product of the former. Michael Laudrup simply wants to win.

That was the clear objective when the Dane arrived in South Wales last summer. His influence was immediate, bringing in a collection of high value, low cost players – Jonathan de Guzman (free loan), Chico Flores (£2 million [$3m]), Michu (£2 million [$3m]), Ki Sung-Yueng (£6 million [$9m]), Pablo Hernandez (£6 million [$9m]) – who would prove pivotal to the club’s League Cup triumph and 9th place finish in the league.

It was that success that raised eyebrows amongst big clubs across the globe. “Yes, there were clubs – a couple of big ones as well – who wanted me,” Laudrup said.

Real Madrid, Paris Saint Germain, Fenerbahce and Monaco were among the superpowers reportedly interested in bringing Laudrup to the next level. Yet with the lure of managerial riches and Champions League football, Laudrup signed a one year extension in March to continue managing the Swans.

But even after that move, many believed Laudrup might still be on his way out of Swansea. So when word hit papers that Laudrup was entangled in a bitter dispute with chairman Huw Jenkins over transfer funds, rumors regarding the manager’s pending departure kicked in to overdrive.

As Swans supporters gnawed their collective fingernails, the club started making moves.

First was the decision to bring in Jose Canas from Real Betis on a free. Then the Swans brought in cover at center-back, buying Juan Amat from Espanyol for £2 million ($3m), and at attacking midfield, signing Alejandro Pozuelo from Betis for £400k ($603k).

Despite the activity, the cut-rate prices didn’t seem to suggest that Laudrup was winning his transfer fund battle over Jenkins. That began to change last week when Jenkins matched his most expensive signing from 2012-13 by dropping £6 million ($9m) on Liverpool midfielder Jonjo Shelvey.

Today, however, it became crystal clear that Laudrup had gotten his way when Swansea smashed their transfer record by agreeing to a £12 million ($18m) deal to sign Ivory Coast international Wilfried Bony from Vitesse Arnhem. Signing Bony, who was the top scorer in the Eredivisie last season having scored 31 goals in just 30 matches, is a clear statement of the Swans’ intent to compete at the highest level.

And with that, all is well in South Wales. Laudrup has his signings and the board has a manager who they don’t need to worry about resigning. “[I]t wasn’t about saying I wanted this, this and this. Or I want £18m, £21m or £24m. It was about knowing we had to strengthen our team,” Laudrup told the South Wales Echo.

So credit to both sides on working through turmoil, but especially to Laudrup for fighting off the sweet smell of a big club move when it seemed easier than not to do so.

“Yes, there were clubs – a couple of big ones as well – who wanted me,” Laudrup admitted. “But I didn’t have to speak to anyone because I want to stay here. Please, never again ask me about my future – it’s a waste of time.”

Well, then. That settles that.

MLS Snapshot: Orlando City SC 2-1 Montreal Impact

Cyle Larin, Orlando City SC

The game in 100 words (or less): For weeks, it was a widely held belief that the Montreal Impact would snatch up the sixth and final playoff place in the Eastern Conference with little or no resistance from their opposition. As they went six games unbeaten (four wins), all looked to be setting up perfect for the club that fired Frank Klopas midseason, but there was another team in the race for sixth that kept winning themselves: Orlando City SC. On Saturday night, Montreal and Orlando City faced off at the Citrus, with the expansion Lions claiming their fourth-straight victory with a 2-1 triumph. Montreal now holds a one-point lead on Orlando in the race for sixth, and have two games in hand, but it’s no longer a foregone conclusion L’Impact will qualify for the playoffs no resistance whatsoever.

[ MORE: | Week 30 TOTW | POTW ]

Three moments that mattered

33′ — Bush’s mistake gifts Larin the opening goal — Larin did what your taught to do as a striker — “put it on frame, test the goalkeeper” — but in no universe does a shot so feeble have any business finding the back of the net. Evan Bush has been great this year. Hopefully (for Montreal’s sake), this howler doesn’t turn into the yips with the playoffs looming.

43′ — Hall’s “mistake” gifts Oduro an equalizer — Dominic Oduro equalized in the 43rd minute, when he took the ball out of the hands of Tally Hall and smashed it into the back of the net, but the goal should have been disallowed due to Hall having full control of the ball.

80′ — Hines hits the winner for Orlando — Seb Hines put the ball back into the mixer and just so happened to find the back of the net in the 80th minute. Sometimes that’s all it takes.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s MLS coverageStandings | Stats | Schedule ]

Man of the match: Seb Hines

Goalscorers: Larin (33′), Oduro (43′), Hines (80′)

MLS Snapshot: NY Red Bulls 2-1 Columbus Crew SC

Bradley Wright-Phillips, New York Red Bulls
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The game in 100 words (or less): Two weeks in a row Columbus Crew SC have had a chance to go top of the Eastern Conference with a victory, and two weeks in a row Crew SC have failed to take a single point from massively important fixtures. Their latest defeat, a 2-1 humbling at the hands of the East-leading New York Red Bulls, started so well for Gregg Berhalter’s side, but was undone by a pair of costly, comedic defensive errors that allowed Lloyd Sam and Bradley Wright-Phillips (15th of the season) to erase an early deficit (Justin Meram) and win all three points. The result not only keeps the Red Bulls top of the East, but gives them a three- and four-point cushion with three and two games in hand on their nearest competitors., D.C. United and New England Revoltion respectively. For Crew SC, they’re four points back of the Red Bulls in fourth place, one point ahead of fifth-place Toronto FC, who have a game in hand.

[ MORE: | Week 30 TOTW | POTW ]

Three moments that mattered

9′ — Meram pokes it past Robles for an early lead — Meram “earned” his goal all the way back in midfield, when the Iraqi international’s mazy run took a routine turnover inside Crew SC’s defensive half and turned it into a dangerous counter-attacking opportunity. Harrison Afful overlapped and provided the cross for Meram to send home.

12′ — Sam capitalizes on multiple mistakes to equalize — Crew SC pass the ball out of the back. They don’t boot it forward to clear. It’s just what they do. Sometimes, that’ll bite you. When your goalkeeper and right back both have blunders clearing the ball 10 seconds apart, you probably deserve to concede an ugly, scrappy goal.

21′ — Wright-Phillips capitalizes on more defensive gaffes — See the above description for Red Bulls goal no. 1.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s MLS coverageStandings | Stats | Schedule ]

Man of the match: Damien Perrinelle

Goalscorers: Meram (9′), Sam (12′), Wright-Phillips (21′)