MLS Preview: Seattle Sounders at San Jose Earthquakes

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  • Osvaldo Alonso to return for Seattle
  • Earthquakes 2-3-0 since Frank Yallop’s departure
  • Seattle won last meeting, 4-0

The up-and-down season of the Seattle Sounders hit another trough last weekend in Vancouver, their 2-0 defeat at BC Place their first MLS loss to the Whitecaps. This week, however, the roller coaster looks set to climb once more, Sigi Schmid’s side in Santa Clara on Saturday to face an Earthquakes team they beat 4-0 at CenturyLink on May 11.

While the shift of venue should have San Jose hope (the Earthquakes are 4-1-4 at home), their results since the ouster of Frank Yallop shouldn’t. Though the Mark Watson era started with a win at Colorado, they played up a man for 72 minutes. In the four games that have followed, San Jose’s only points came from their remarkable comeback against the Galaxy at Stanford Stadium. Recently losses at Chicago and New England only reaffirm the notion that their coaching change has done little to curb the team’s struggles.

The Gold Cup isn’t helping matters. Chris Wondolowski is posting hat tricks for the United States. Marvin Chavez bagged a goal in Honduras’s opener. Nana Attakora’s living through Canada’s disappointment. Add Clarence Goodson to the list, and San Jose is tied with Real Salt Lake and Toronto for most absences for this year’s competition, even if Goodson has yet to suit up for the Earthquakes since moving back to Major League Soccer.

Seattle’s roster if Gold Cup-free, but with Obafemi Martins, Sharlie Joseph, and Steve Zakuani set to miss the game with injuries, starting a first choice team continues to be a problem for the Sounders. They’ll get their best player back, however, with Osvaldo Alonso expected to play for the first time since June 1. That will solve Seattle’s problems in central midfield, but with their top scoring threat (Martins) out, it’s worth wondering if the stars will ever align to keep a number of key, fragile parts healthy at the same time.

Were Seattle closer to the top of the conference, that would be less of an issue, as Schmid could manage his squad with the idea of preserving his veterans near the end of the season, cruising into the playoffs while recharging his core. Without the U.S. Open Cup or CONCACAF Champions League to worry about, Seattle’s deep quad should may still be able to do that, but unless that process involves a quicker climb from their seventh place hole, the Sounders will be pushing their players in important games through at least the end of October.

To put Seattle’s plight in perspective, for as many troubles as San Jose have had this season, the Earthquakes are only three points behind the Sounders. While Seattle has played four fewer games — a huge number — the thin gap between them and a team few are talking about for a playoff spot highlights the work that remains They have the games in hand to make up their five-point gap on fifth place Vancouver, yet Seattle are quickly descending to a place that makes those games vital.

Losing to San Jose — allowing the Earthquakes to become another competitor for a playoff spot — will only complicate life for the Sounders.

More: San Jose have allowed 19 shots on goal in their last two games … Seattle have scored twice in their last four road games, both goals coming at Chivas USA … Wondolowski is the only Earthquakes player who has scored against the Sounders this season (two games).

Report: USMNT’s Arriola drawing transfer interest abroad, in MLS

AP Photo/LM Otero
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Paul Arriola’s motor was constantly running as the United States men’s national team claimed its sixth Gold Cup title, and it could drive him all the way from Club Tijuana to Europe or a prime spot on an MLS roster.

There’s a snag, though.

[ MORE: Everton wins Europa opener ]

Arriola is reportedly wanted by Real Salt Lake and clubs in both the Netherlands and Portugal, but the LA Galaxy has what Goal.com describes a “dubious homegrown player” claim on Arriola, who participated in a minimal of practices with the Galaxy when he was younger.

As you’ll see below, there isn’t much “homegrown” about it and, to its critics, it is peak MLS monopolized tomfoolery. Here’s how Goal describes it:

“He was already a U.S. youth national team player when he traveled the 120 miles from Chula Vista to take part in a handful of training sessions with the LA Galaxy academy and eventually the Galaxy first team.

“The Galaxy are believed to hold a homegrown player claim on Arriola, and would have the right of first refusal on making Arriola an offer if he comes to MLS. The Galaxy’s current salary-cap situation might not allow them to make a serious bid for Arriola.”

But… here’s how the Galaxy described his choosing to sign for TJ instead of a pro deal from LA in 2013:

“It’s a little disappointing,” Galaxy technical director Jovan Kirovski told MLSsoccer.com by phone on Friday. “He went through our system, we offered him a contract and he decided to move on and go somewhere else. But that’s going to happen. It’s something that has happened before, and it’s something that will happen again.”

Arriola’s response in the same article? “I thank the Galaxy for giving me a wonderful opportunity to train with their first team and be a part of their first team which really taught me a lot.” That doesn’t read as much like he “went through their system.” He played in at least one U-18 game, debuting in October 2012, did more training with TJ in December 2012, and signed for the Mexican side in May 2013.

Should that qualify him as Homegrown?

https://www.transfermarkt.com/paul-arriola/leistungsdaten/spieler/189876

Did Arriola spent significant time with LA, or is it possible the Galaxy might reap rewards from having an already established youth national teamer to practice when he was a kid? Whether you’re okay with that or not, consider that it encourages clubs to pilfer rights without actually registering or training the player.

Not to mention there is no guarantee that playing in the Netherlands or Portugal will be better for his development than MLS. Benfica or Ajax and potential action in European tournaments? Maybe. NAC Breda or Tondela? Maybe not.

Nevermind the quagmire that is American youth soccer clubs’ not earning money from transfer fees, the Arriola drama seems baseless. We don’t know the Galaxy will hold the player hostage, but they would actually be depriving MLS of a talent, as LA would theoretically get nothing should TJ sell him to a European club.

In any event, check out Arriola’s use chart from Tijuana and you’ll see why he’s valued by Bruce Arena as well as his suitors. He’s a Swiss Army Knife. Here’s hoping Tinseltown doesn’t stop him from a proper next step (assuming he’s ready to leave Liga MX).