Screen shot 2013-07-12 at 9.03.16 PM

Shahid Khan is American, bought Fulham, is probably not the end of English soccer

5 Comments

Shahid Khan was born in Pakistan, but the Jacksonville Jaguars owner is American. Thanks to a fortune accumulated in the auto parts business, Khan is also a billionaire. And as of Friday, he’s the sixth American owner in the English Premier League.

Mohamed Al Fayed, a man who has bankrolled Fulham’s rise and subsequent stabilization in the Premier League, has sold Fulham FC to Khan, ending his 16-year stewardship of the West London club. Under his watch, Fulham rose from the third division to the Premiership, where the Cottagers have spent the last 12 years. The club has had some close calls with relegation (memorably in 2007-08), but over the last four years, Fulham have never finished lower than 12th, with a record seventh place finish 2008-09 leading to a Europa League final the following season.

Those efforts will live on a Cottager legend, but right now, it was time for Al Fayed to move on. From his statement on the club’s website:

But now is the right time for me to retire and spend time playing football with my grandchildren. I am sad but proud of our achievements. I am very grateful to Fulham’s fans, the most incredible fans in the world. They have given me their support and affection whenever they have seen me at home games. I would never let them down. I have passed the Club to a talented, honest and highly capable man who respects Fulham and its traditions. He is a great sportsman.

From said sportsman:

Fulham is the perfect club at the perfect time for me.  I want to be clear, I do not view myself so much as the owner of Fulham, but a custodian of the club on behalf of its fans.  My priority is to ensure the club and Craven Cottage each have a viable and sustainable Premier League future that fans of present and future generations can be proud of. We will manage the club’s financial and operational affairs with prudence and care, with youth development and community programs as fundamentally important elements of Fulham’s future.

The reference to Craven Cottage is the best thing Khan could have said on Day 1. The venue is synonymous with the club. Any attempt to move away or significantly change the 25,700-seat ground on the Thames would destroy the club’s identity, ruining the very thing Khan’s bought into.

What this means competitively for Fulham and Cottagers is unclear, though Reuters’ reporter Simon Evans does a good job of painting what Khan’s ownership will be like:

New Fulham chief Shahid Khan, thePremier League’s latest foreign owner, is likely to break the mould and be one of the most open and public of billionaires to take control of one of England’s top flight clubs …

 “He is kind of a rock star with the fans,” Alfie Crow, editor of theJaguars’ fan blog ‘Big Cat Country,’ told Reuters.

“He comes out to practice, interacts with the fans and talks to them. He is very much out there and engaged. He has really energised people.”

 Any trepidation Jaguars fans initially had about the team’s new owner quickly dissipated as he won them over with his charm, not to mention a thick handlebar mustache and flowing hair that is a marked change from the staid image of the traditional NFL owner.

Not everybody covering the sale took Evans’s approach. Perhaps predictably, The Guardian’s David Conn used the moment to deride the qualities and motives of U.S. owners, undoubtedly sending shots down the throats of thousands of readers playing the David Conn drinking game:

Football, loved around the world, is here, in the land where it began 150 years ago, selling some of its most “storied” clubs to billionaires from the US, just about the only country which has never been entranced by the game.

As they have arrived, to own Manchester United, Liverpool, Arsenal, Aston Villa, Sunderland and now Fulham, these shrewd and calculating billionaires have rarely convincingly explained what is driving this gradual US takeover of our soccer. …

This is becoming a critical group now, six clubs of 20, takeovers never planned, barely explained. At the same time more football people are outspokenly lamenting the imbalance between the clubs as global investments and the weakness of the England team, representing a sport still organised country by country. The long-term implications of overseas, predominantly US, mostly financially acquisitive ownership have not been considered; the clubs have just been sold, one by one.

Conn is consistent in his use of Americans as a type of boogeyman symbolizing everything wrong with the non-German soccer world. Many of his arguments are compelling, and those problems may very well exist, but his use of U.S. ownership as a strawman undermines his points, portraying a bias that made his Friday commentary inevitable the moment Fulham posted their announcement.

I doubt Khan is not a member of a cabal of American businessmen intent on striking the last blow of the American Revolution, the one that would ruin a communist sport the U.S. hates more than an empty revolver or a line at the McDonald’s drive-thru. In all likelihood, he’s just a man who wants to own a team in the Premier League, and among the people in the world who have both the means and desire to do so, it’s not that surprising he happens to be American. The U.S. is a huge, rich, sports-mad country with a relatively large class of people with ridiculous levels of disposable income. At some point, this becomes a function of probability, not the bi-product of a plan to destroy “our soccer”.

Sarcasm aside, there is something worth discussing in this “six clubs of 20” dynamic. The simplest assumption is that these people have bought into the Premier League because they covert something in either the business or sport, but in time, is it possible these owners may come together to secure their investment? Will a more American model be imposed on the league? And to what extent would the non-U.S. owners even object to that?

(MORE: But what about that silly Michael Jackson statue?)

That’s an interesting discussion to have, but it’s entirely hypothetical. Hypothetical and paranoid, given the lack of evidence supporting the notion. Right now, the only major difference between today’s Premier League and Friday morning’s is Fulham’s owner, somebody who is likely to have resources, views, motives, and reactions that are completely independent of his five American colleagues. Not all Americans are the same, and not every American’s intent on imposing a set of values on the Premier League.

Whether he succeeds or fails, Khan’s time at Fulham is more likely to be defined by his distinctions from Malcolm Glazer, Stan Kroenke, John Henry, Randy Lerner, and Ellis Short. And as Evans describes, Khan is likely to completely different from a typical U.S. owner, a man who could more like to the man he’s replacing than the group into which he’s been lumped.

WATCH: Man City’s Aguero, Nasri play soccer tennis atop Great Wall of China

Leave a comment

Manchester City stars Samir Nasri and Sergio Aguero have both been under pressure in recent weeks for being out of shape, at least according to Pep Guardiola’s pizza-free standards.

One way to help fix that is better fitness, though we’re doubting that soccer tennis atop the Great Wall of China is necessarily going to tip the scales (pun absolutely, 100 percent intended).

[ MORE: Guzan finds new PL home ]

Nasri and James Horsfield of Man City took on teammates Aguero and Kelechi Iheanacho in the match, which resulted in a half-dozen balls sent over the wall.

Games like this, sometimes even more than actual matches, remind many of us how far we are from the magical touch and control of elite players.

Reports: Pogba passes Manchester United medical; Announcement nears

Juventus FC v US Sassuolo Calcio - Serie A
Photo by Valerio Pennicino/Getty Images
Leave a comment

The seemingly inevitable to end to years of speculation is nigh.

With the record-breaking fee agreed, Paul Pogba has reportedly passed his medical with Manchester United and is set to join the club in England.

It’s also worth noting that Pogba hasn’t been dealing with injuries, and reporting that he’s passed a medical is a pretty safe bet.

[ MORE: Guzan finds new PL home ]

Pogba, 23, left Manchester United for Juventus in 2012 after the Old Trafford club didn’t meet his contractual demands, infuriating then-manager Alex Ferguson.

His play at Juventus proved his caliber, and new boss Jose Mourinho has been adamant that United needed to acquire the midfielder.

Hints that Real Madrid — who loooooves to break transfer records — had edged back into the race have been squashed, though we’ve learned anything can happen when United and Real are involved in a transfer (See: De Gea, Beckham, Ronaldo).

Atletico Madrid edges frame-rattling Spurs 1-0; Yedlin impresses at LB

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - JULY 29:  DeAndre Yedlin of Tottenham Hotspur and Sime Vrsaljko of Atletico de Madrid compete for the ball during 2016 International Champions Cup Australia match between Tottenham Hotspur and Atletico de Madrid at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on July 29, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia.  (Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images)
Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Diego Godin’s close range redirection gave Atletico Madrid a 1-0 win over Tottenham Hotspur in an open match in Australia on Friday.

The International Champions Cup match was missing several big names including Harry Kane, Koke, Dele Alli, and Antoine Griezmann, so it’s hard to make any judgments either way.

[ MORE: Guzan finds new PL home ]

Spurs rattled the post and banged one off the crossbar in the loss, which comes days after a 2-1 setback of sorts against Juventus.

USMNT back DeAndre Yedlin and American prospect Cameron Carter-Vickers started in the back line. Yedlin was again at left back, and impressed in 60 minutes of work.

Godin appeared to be well offside in the 40th minute when Kyle Walker‘s ill-fated flick came his way inside the six.

USMNT keeper Guzan staying in Premier League, joins Boro

SEATTLE, WA - JUNE 16:  Goalkeeper Brad Guzan #1 of the United States defends against Ecuador during the 2016 Quarterfinal - Copa America Centenario match at CenturyLink Field on June 16, 2016 in Seattle, Washington.  (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)
Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Brad Guzan is leaving a relegation campaign, and hopes he won’t be facing another.

The USMNT goalkeeper and starter at this summer’s Copa America Centenario, Guzan was announced Friday as the latest signing in a busy summer for newly-promoted Middlesbrough.

[ EUROPA: West Ham loses in Slovenia ]

Guzan will have a heck of a battle for the No. 1 shirt, as new recruit Victor Valdes and incumbent Dimitrios Konstantopoulos are in the fold at Riverside Stadium.

The 31-year-old leaves Aston Villa after eight seasons and 171 appearances, a tenure that included a 16-appearance loan to Hull City. He was a runner-up in the League Cup and FA Cup, and internationally won the Golden Glove at the 2015 Gold Cup.

Boro have added Antonio Barragan, Alvaro Negredo, Gaston Ramirez, Viktor Fischer, Marten de Roon, and Bernardo Espinosa this summer in preparation for their first PL campaign since 2008-09.