Real Salt Lake v Philadelphia Union

Jason Kreis vs. referee assignments; is the Real Salt Lake manager correct in his complaints?


Before you read Real Salt Lake manager Jason Kreis’ caustic comments on referee Matthew Foerster, here are the relevant facts:

  • Foerster came into Saturday’s contest with 15 matches of MLS experience.
  • This was a contest between two of the league’s top teams of the moment, the current Eastern and Western conference leaders. Real Salt Lake is currently in the Supporters Shield lead.
  • Sporting Kansas City matches are difficult to deal with. The team is smart in its tactical, midfield fouling and, along with San Jose, the league’s most physical team. Plus, manager Peter Vermes will go apoplectic along the sidelines about the smallest things, like10 yards of positioning on a throw-in.
  • Real Salt Lake’s Chris Wingert was ejected, receiving his second yellow card in the 66th minute. That turned the match, which RSL was leading at the time. SKC’s game-winner fell in the 97th minute.
  • The second yellow was harsh – but the first was probably a yellow and a half as Wingert lined up and leveled Kei Kamara. So, that’s a wash in my mind.

So … here’s what Kreis had to say:

Again, I don’t want to belabor the point about the referee being poor. He is going to be poor. It is the 16th match of his entire career. To referee in a sold-out stadium, in a first-place versus second-place matchup is the wrong game for somebody that has [little] experience in professional soccer refereeing.”

“I asked again, and I’ll say it now: Maybe I need to call them and speak to them directly. There needs to be more thought about how we are assigning the referees.”

So, does he have a point?

Yes and no.

There are instances where I have said the same this year, that these things deserve more thought.

As for Saturday, there were certainly more experienced men out there. In Chicago, Edvin Jurisevic was doing his 60st MLS match (one between two teams nowhere near playoff positions). In Toronto, Jorge Gonzalez was on MLS match No. 101. In Montreal, Hilario Grajeda was on his 90th MLS match. (Although, in fairness, Impact manager Marco Schallibaum is proving quite difficult to deal with, so an experienced man is handy there.)

So, in that regard, Kreis has a point.

But are those guys much better than Foerster? Not much, if we’re being honest.

The other element to consider here is a busy summer of soccer that is stretching the pool of experienced referees.

The bottom line here: Major League Soccer refereeing is improving … slowly. Believe me. It is.

But clearly there is still some distance to go; the best everyone can hope for is continued improvement, and that the bad breaks equal out in the end.

Klopp to the Kop: Multiple reports say deal agreed at Liverpool

TURIN, ITALY - FEBRUARY 24:  Borussia Dortmund coach Jurgen Klopp shouts to his players during the UEFA Champions League Round of 16 match between Juventus and Borussia Dortmund at Juventus Arena on February 24, 2015 in Turin, Italy.  (Photo by Marco Luzzani/Getty Images)
Marco Luzzani/Getty Images

Jurgen Klopp is on his way to Liverpool to sign a contract naming him the next coach of the Reds.

The celebrated manager, 48, has been on “hiatus” from football since leaving Borussia Dortmund last season.

[ MORE: Messi to stand trial in Spain ]

Reports starting emerging earlier today that an agreement was imminent, and now the BBC is among those reporting that Klopp will be rolled out Friday morning.

From the BBC:

No contract has yet been signed but that is viewed as a formality when Klopp arrives in Liverpool later on Thursday. He will be officially unveiled by Liverpool on Friday morning at 10:00 BST.

There’s not much to say besides this: Klopp’s addition to the Premier League will give more color and brilliance to the country’s footballing scene. Only a certain class of manager can be instantly expected to find a better system for an inherited group of players.

This could and should be a game changer on Merseyside.

Appeal rejected! Lionel Messi will face court trial in Spain

VIGO, SPAIN - SEPTEMBER 23:  Lionel Messi looks dejected after the La Liga match between Celta Vigo and FC Barcelona at Estadio Balaidos on September 23, 2015 in Vigo, Spain.  (Photo by Alex Caparros/Getty Images)
Alex Caparros/Getty Images
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It was a mere 48 hours ago that Lionel Messi looked close to in the clear when it came to tax evasion charges.

Now the question is whether a Spanish court will lock away the greatest active footballer, as a judge rejected the prosecutors’ (!!!) request to drop the charges.

[ WATCH: Hilarious spoof pegs Messi, Ronaldo as “Friends” ]

Messi and his father have already made a $5.5 million corrective payment, but there’s principle in play here. And the judge wants to know how Messi can claim he had no idea what was being done with his money.

From the BBC:

Lawyers acting on behalf of the tax authorities demanded 22-month jail sentences for both defendants.

“There are rational signs that the criminality was committed by both accused parties,” wrote the judge in a court filing, according to the AFP news agency.

Can you imagine one of the world’s richer men ending up in a Spanish prison? It’s very difficult to consider. In some ways it’s more plausible that he would buy his own island and start the “Messi Isle Premiership”.

Still, we won’t laugh off the idea, especially with FIFA apparently going down. Messi in prison. That’s something. Sepp in Switzerland. Lionel in Spain.