Nat Borchers

Admiration Cup: Real Salt Lake’s U.S. Open Cup quest continues at Portland’s expense


The prelude to Wednesday’s U.S. Open Cup semifinal in Sandy focused on the styles Real Salt Lake and Portland would bring to the game. RSL has long been thought to play some of the most aesthetically pleasing soccer in MLS, while the philosophy Caleb Porter’s brought to the Timbers has made “Porterball” shorthand for attractive soccer. When, earlier this week, Porter espoused his admiration for RSL, discussed how he’d watch them before he moved to MLS, the mutual appreciation was palpable.

While the love fest played out in its predictably pleased fashion at Rio Tinto on Wednesday, the occasion reminded us that stakes really matter. Yeah, it was nice that two teams who like to keep it on the ground and move it quickly where going at each other, but this was a U.S. Open Cup semifinal. In an elimination game, only the final score mattered. There were no points for artistic merit.

If there were, Álvaro Saborio would have racked them up with his seventh minute, looping goal from the left of the box, his shot off a Kyle Beckerman cross arcing over Donovan Ricketts, against the far post, and in for the opening score.

RSL held that lead until the 78th minute when substitute Joao Plata, taking a lay-off from Saborio, doubled his team’s lead from 25 yards, seemingly putting the home side into the U.S. Open Cup final.

That assumption was almost proven wrong in stoppage time. Just after the clock struck 90:00, Diego Valeri headed home the rebound of his own shot, giving the Timbers new life.

That life, however, was extinguished four minutes later when full time was blown on the Timbers’ Cup run. With the 2-1 win, Real Salt Lake is into the final, set to host D.C. United on October 1 with a chance to win their first U.S. Open Cup.

The warm congratulations, celebrations between the teams after the game harkened back to the match’s prelude – the focus on style. It was clear the two teams, somewhat isolated in their philosophies in the pragmatic world of MLS, had an appreciation for each others’ games. Set to face off two more times this month, the teams will have more opportunities to reflect on each other’s quality. Perhaps a type of rival can be sparked from their mutual appreciation: The Admiration Cup.

Ultimately, it was the result that mattered, with RSL fans and Portland supporters little concerned with their aesthetics after final whistle. The Timbers were out of the competition, missing out on the opportunity to host the U.S. Open Cup final. RSL, on the other hand, gets a showcase in Sandy and the chance to claim the club’s second major trophy.

Mourinho “working like never before” to turn Chelsea around

Jose Mourinho, Chelsea FC
Leave a comment

Jose Mourinho got the dreaded much-needed vote of confidence from Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich last weekend, seemingly giving the Portuguese manager a temporary stay of execution despite the Blues’ worst start to a season in 37 years.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s PL coverage ]

Speaking this week, Mourinho has revealed that while he’s thankful to have been kept on at the club for which he regularly professes his love, he still thinks it was no-brainer for Abramovich. In other words, Mourinho’s not backing down from his incredible, seven-minute rant to one question following Saturday’s defeat to Southampton.

Mourinho, on what he’s doing to turn Chelsea around — quotes from the Guardian:

“It shows the confidence of Abramovich in the manager who has won three Premier League titles with this club. I thank him and I keep working.

“What’s going on? I do not know. The results with Chelsea at the moment have been really bad. I cannot hide that reality, and I don’t want to. And I struggle to find an explanation. But I assure you: I’m working like never before and we will come out of this. And there is also the Champions League that we will not neglect, for certain.”

What did you expect from Mourinho? Well, you know, I should probably be fired, but thanks to Mr. Abramovich for not realizing this and keeping me employed? It’s simultaneously interesting and the least surprising thing ever, though, that Mourinho claims to not know what’s wrong with Chelsea at the moment. Of course he has a theory (or five), and of course he’s “working like never before” to correct it.

[ MORE: Ozil, Coquelin say Arsenal can win the title this season ]

The most fascinating thing about Chelsea’s sluggish start to the season is to see, hear and read Mourinho speaking from a position of powerlessness. Always the clever one, the one dictating where the discussion goes, the one in charge of every press interaction, Saturday’s rant felt like watching a desperate Mourinho grasping for anything by which to pull himself back up.

Reports link Guardiola with Manchester City summer move

Bayern Muenchen v Borussia Moenchengladbach - Bundesliga
Photo by Lennart Preiss/Bongarts/Getty Images
1 Comment

There are claims out of Spain that Manchester City has a verbal agreement to bring Pep Guardiola to town when his Bayern Munich contract expires in June.

Don’t expect comment from Guardiola, who bristles when discussing his future. In the past he’s hinted he might not be the right man for the Bavarian side, but has lamented any questions about clubs other than Bayern.

Now Mundo Deportivo writer Francesc Aguilar says there’s a secret agreement between Guardiola and Manchester City director of football Txiki Begiristain to reunite at the Etihad Stadium this summer.

[ MORE: Three big battles between U.S. and Mexico ]

Both Barcelona buffs and former Spanish internationals, Begiristain was Barca’s director of football when Guardiola took over for Frank Rjikaard in 2008.

Manuel Pellegrini signed a contract extension this summer and has led the club to a Premier League title, though the club has struggled in European competition. For what it’s worth, the Manchester Evening News got rumor reaction from Sergio Aguero:

On the latest Guardiola rumour, Kun said: “It has been talked about a lot. I don’t know him, but he’s a great manager and it’s wonderful to have the best managers train you.”

But he also added: “I’m very good with Manuel Pellegrini, we talk a lot. I’m happy in the team and with him, but the club will be the one who chooses who comes in.”

In other words, “I’m really good, and they pay me well enough that I’m prepared to play for any big name that arrives.”

It’s a story to keep up with, even as it intrudes on the seasons of two big, rich European clubs.