Deadline day ends David Moyes’s honeymoon at Manchester United


If David Moyes wasn’t so respected, people would be talking about his team’s last two performances.  After 11 years at Goodison, though, Moyes had earned most people’s benefit of the doubt. Others may have been assuaged by his role as Alex Ferguson’s hand-picked successor. Regardless, Moyes had enough cachet to defuse debate. Only a handful of people wondered aloud whether Ferguson would have found a way to get full points last Monday or if Manchester United would have been held at arm’s length at Anfield were Ferguson still coaching.

But United’s first three games, as a whole, have been underwhelming, particularly considering only Paul Scholes is absent from the squad that won last year’s Premier League. The opening night victory at Swansea was impressive in totality, questionable in parts, but followup performances against Chelsea and Liverpool were uninspiring. If it wasn’t for what now seems like a honeymoon period, people would be openly debating whether the conservative tendencies that served Moyes so well at Everton have already cost him points at Manchester United.

It’s not exactly a fireable offense. Far from it. Throughout the corse of a season, most managers make decisions that cost their teams points. The best eventually make up for it with their good calls. Regardless, we discuss those performances, particularly when the manager in questions is running the most famous club in England. And while there have been some critiques of Moyes’s first three games, they’ve been meek. If he hasn’t gotten an outright pass, he’s at least received the benefit of the doubt.

That’s the context for Monday’s debacle. Given how disappointed Manchester United fans will be, it’s difficult to see that benefit of the doubt lasting, even if Ed Woodward (United’s executive vice chairman) deserves some of the blame. In the face of the Ander Herrera embarrassment, the inability to get Fabio Coentrao’s paperwork sorted out, having to pay over Marouane Fellaini’s original buyout, as well as the failed fixations on Cesc Fábregas and Leighton Baines, United’s transfer window reads like a list of failures neophyte management would make at their first clubs. It’s certainly not the type window fans are used to.

source: APManchester United, at a minimum, is well-run. They’re usually decisive. They’re usually effective. When they decide to do something, it usually gets done. Question their years without buying a midfielder, wonder why they paid too much for Dimitar Berbatov, or what they’re doing buying players like Bebe. Their judgment wasn’t always impeccable, but under Ferguson and David Gill, they were able to do what they wanted.

Sometimes it was unfair, almost to the point of being ruthless. The price they paid for Robin van Persie was so cheap opposing teams’ fans complained the system was biased. When they sold Cristiano Ronaldo, they got 41.3 percent more than the previous world transfer record – a huge, almost inexplicable leap. They even got under Daniel Levy’s skin in the Berbatov deal, frustrating the Spurs chairman with a last-minute (albeit expensive) swoop. Add in their 13 titles in 21 seasons, and at least within the British Isles, United tends to get what they want.

Now, in their first transfer window without Gill and Ferguson, that’s all changed. Now the club’s negotiating with phantom agents in Spain. They’re getting played by Bill Kenwright. They spend most of the summer drooling over a midfielder who’s only two years into his tenure at his hometown club, and given the chance to get a Portuguese international who wants away from Real Madrid, they’re undone by administrative errors. Though United eventually landed Fellaini, Woodward and Moyes’s first window is destined to be defined by their failures.

This is not what United fans are used to. They’re not used to seeing Arsenal land Mesut Ozil and Spurs spend around $150 million while they’re left frustrated. They’re not used to being out-foxed by Everton or being undone or seeing the type of paperwork errors that befall clubs embarrass their team. That these are new management’s first major decisions leaves fans right to wonder whether the last three weeks are the aberration or the rule.

The razor-thin silver lining to this mess: Manchester United’s last two, tepid results are now an afterthought. But when the team returns to the field on Sept. 14, the honeymoon will be over. The frustration, embarrassment, and lack of confidence emanating from Monday’s failures mean the benefit of the doubt is gone. On field performance and off field decisions are entirely different things, but with United fans thrown into a new, unfamiliar state of doubt, they won’t give their new manager pass. Not anymore.

Between fake agents, paper work problems, and being forced to pay above a player’s buyout, Manchester United had one of the most memorable deadline days of all time. Don’t expect Red Devils’ fans to forget it any time soon.

Statement from suspended UEFA president Michel Platini

Michel Platini, UEFA & FIFA
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Statement from suspended UEFA President Michel Platini:

Early this afternoon, I was informed of the FIFA ethics committee’s decision to impose on me a provisional 90-day suspension with immediate effect. That decision, which I will of course contest in the appropriate manner at the appropriate time, had already been the subject of a deliberate leak, and I gave my opinion on that earlier in the day.

I reject all of the allegations that have been made against me, which are based on mere semblances and are astonishingly vague. Indeed, the wording of those allegations merely states that a breach of the FIFA Code of Ethics “seems to have been committed” and that a decision on the substance of the matter cannot be taken immediately.

Despite the farcical nature of these events, I refuse to believe that this is a political decision taken in haste in order to taint a lifelong devotee of the game or crush my candidacy for the FIFA presidency.

I want everyone to know my state of mind: more than a sense of injustice or a desire for revenge, I am driven by a profound feeling of staunch defiance. I am more determined than ever to defend myself before the relevant judicial bodies.

I want to reiterate in the strongest possible terms that I will devote myself to ensuring that my good faith prevails. I have received numerous messages of support today from UEFA’s member associations and the other confederations encouraging me to continue my work serving football’s interests. Nothing will make me give up on that commitment.

EURO 2016: Ireland shock Germany, Northern Ireland qualify

Shane Long, Ireland
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A recap of Thursday’s action in 2016 European Championship qualifying:

Ireland 1-0 Germany

Southampton striker Shane Long scored the goal that knocked off the defending world champions and pushed Ireland one step closer to next summer’s European Championship in France. Long, who entered the game in the 65th minute, latched onto Darren Randolph‘s ball over the top in the 70th minute, took one touch to settle and fired for the far post, beating Manuel Neuer for the game’s only goal.

With one game still to play, Ireland (18 points) sit third in Group D, level on points with Sunday’s opponent Poland. While the winner of Sunday’s clash could leapfrog Germany (19), they will more likely finish second in the group and qualify automatically. A draw on Sunday could still see both sides qualify automatically through the ranking of third-place finishers (the top third-place finishers from group play earns an automatic berth at EURO 2016).

Northern Ireland 3-1 Greece

Norther Ireland (20 points) topped Greece (3), 3-1 on Thursday to officially book their place at EURO 2016. Steven Davis scored twice and Josh Magennis added the third for Michael O’Neill’s side.

With one game still to play (Sunday, at Finland), Northern Ireland can finish no lower than second. A draw against Finland, or any points dropped by Romania (17) would see Northern Ireland finish top of Group F.

Portugal 1-0 Denmark

Joao Moutinho scored the only goal of the game to secure Portugal’s (18 points from just seven games) place at next summer’s tournament. The defeat sees Denmark remain second in Group I, a point ahead of third-place Albania, who lost to Serbia on Thursday. Having played all eight of their group games, Denmark can go no higher than 12 points, meaning they would fail to qualify if Albania beat Armenia on Sunday. A draw between Albania and Armenia would see Denmark qualify based on tiebreakers.

Elsewhere in EURO 2016 qualifying action

Group D

Scotland 2-2 Poland
Georgia 4-0 Gibraltar

Group F

Hungary 2-1 Faroe Islands
Romania 1-1 Finland

Group I

Albania 0-2 Serbia