Five key U.S. moments that shaped the United States’ successful World Cup qualification campaign

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COLUMBUS, Ohio – What you will notice about the critical moments as the United States reached a seventh consecutive World Cup: so many are clustered around that March turning point, as a team that could have easily wandered off the so-called Road to Rio found its better self and put things right.

(As for “Five key moments …” Clearly, clinching over Mexico qualifies as a key moment; but as that seems so obvious, and it happened just a few hours ago, meaning we’ve written plenty about it already, we drilled down a little further and picked something else.)

Sept. 11, 2012: U.S. beats Jamaica

The team had lost in Jamaica just days earlier, and the chorus of Jurgen Klinsmann doubters was getting louder. A loss that night in Columbus could have left the United States in a real tizzy, struggling mightily just to get out of the semifinal round. Plus, the symbolic weight of losing on 9/11 would have been a further sore spot to deal with. But the United States dominated the visitors that night, and Herculez Gomez’s free kick goal sealed the deal.

March 18, 2013: U.S. arrives into Denver

U.S. players and coaches arrived into Denver just as The Sporting News piece fell, pulling back the covers on some unpleasant business inside Camp Klinsmann. The least flattering parts of the story were or were not accurate, depending on whom you ask, but there was clearly something not quite right inside the locker room.

Meetings were had, things were said and, in the end, the entire camp seemed to benefit from that cathartic moment. They found a way to bond – even if was over their public outing of their inability to fully bond. Klinsmann and some of the players may not say so publicly, the United States national team benefitted from the story, getting things out in the open. (And what a talker it was for the rest of us.)

source: Getty ImagesMarch 22, 2013: U.S. beats Costa Rica in the Snow Clasico

Of course, the renewed sense of togetherness and good feeling could only “take” through a win over Costa Rica. And what a surreal night it was, as heavy snow blanketed the Dicks Sporting Goods Park field in a way that will never be forgotten, with something that only resembled soccer being played through all the fluffy white stuff. The Ticos were incensed, but never mind that.

Jermaine Jones had his best night in a U.S. shirt (finally demonstrating his value to U.S. supporters, who were understandably having trouble seeing it) and victory was had through an early Clint Dempsey goal … and what an important victory it was.

March 22, 2013: U.S. draws with Mexico

The scoreless draw with Mexico at fabled Azteca may not look as impressive now, given El Tri’s mighty struggles of the moment. But it was a big deal then, not only as a rare point earned at Azteca Stadium, but in helping sow further chaos in the Mexican camp.

Don’t forget, the United States’ was making significant changes, still ushering in the Omar Gonzalez and Matt Besler era at center back, with former captain Carlos Bocanegra having to step aside. And Brad Guzan was in goal for the injured Tim Howard, so critical squad depth was being built at the same time.

Honestly, a win at Azteca a few months prior was just as important. It was just a friendly, but the historic 1-0 win that day did two things: It demonstrated to Klinsmann’s team they could, without a doubt, beat Mexico at Azteca. That helped tremendously in the March draw.

And as the positive results in friendlies piled up (a win at Italy, a huge win over Scotland, etc.) the messages that Klinsmann was steadily delivering were taking hold. Players were “buying in.”

June 7, 2013: Jozy Altidore scores again

Jozy Altidore’s ongoing success of that moment – he scored in a 1-0 win over Jamaica in Kingston – was emblematic of the overall program’s swell of success.

He was on a serious roll. The team was on a serious roll. The United States followed that result by traveling to Seattle and never giving poor Panama a moment to breath in a commanding 2-0 win. The strong stuff carried over as another crew of players propped up the highly successful Gold Cup bid, and the dash for World Cup 2014 in Brazil seemed to gain unstoppable momentum through that lofty June-July progression of accomplishment.

 

USMNT: Brooks out with hip strain; World Cup qualifiers loom

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John Brooks is out of Hertha Berlin’s lineup “for the time being” after scans revealed a hip strain suffered in this weekend’s win over Wolfsburg.

That’s all Hertha has said, and that makes it hard to imagine whether American fans should be a little concerned or very concerned ahead of the USMNT’s World Cup qualifiers against Mexico, and Trinidad and Tobago in early June.

Brooks was unavailable for two weeks with an adductor strain in September, missing a month before returning to the starting lineup.

The U.S. center back pool isn’t teeming after Brooks and Geoff Cameron. Matt Besler, Tim Ream, Omar Gonzalez, and Walker Zimmerman were called up for the last World Cup qualifiers, and Gonzalez struggled but is a Bruce Arena favorite from their time in L.A.

WATCH: Snazzy Sargent goal leads U.S. U-17s past Mexico

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Josh Sargent scored a pretty goal as the United States Soccer program had another banner day against Mexico.

Nearly two months to the day after the U.S. U-20 side beat Mexico for the first time in 31 years, the U.S. U-17 topped El Tri for the first time ever. That win snapped Mexico’s 25-match unbeaten streak.

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The goal is the first of Sargent’s two goals, as the 16-year-old latched onto a long diagonal ball and used his right foot and head to move the ball into position for a strong shot.

The U.S. clinches a spot in the next round of U-17 World Cup qualifying with one match remaining in group play.

Sargent is from St. Louis and plays with Scott Gallagher-Missouri. Former Philadelphia Union coach John Hackworth coaches the U.S. U-17s.

Heads of South American soccer sent $128M in bank transfers

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SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) The leaders of South America’s soccer confederation transferred $128.6 million between 2000 and 2015 to personal accounts, suspicious accounts, or unauthorized third-party accounts, according to an audit released Wednesday by Ernst & Young.

According to the audit presented to the annual CONMEBOL congress in the Chilean capital, the confederation’s former president Nicolas Leoz transferred $26.9 million to his personal accounts. Leoz was the president for 27 years until resigning in 2013 for what he said were health reasons.

The audit also found $58 million in payments “to third parties without adequate documentation,” payments of $33.3 million to “unidentified accounts,” and $10.4 million to “suspicious third-parties.”

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“We had said that we would have four pillars, and the first two pillars were clear accounts and accountability,” said Alejandro Dominguez, the president of CONMEBOL who commissioned the audit last year. “Today we are accountable to the leaders and the whole world of football.”

Leoz, 88, is one of three ex-presidents of CONMEBOL accused on corruption charges by the United States Department of Justice. He is in Paraguay fighting extradition to the United States.

The South American body has been plagued by corruption, which was exposed two years ago during the FIFA scandal. Leoz’s two successors, Eugenio Figueredo and Juan Angel Napout, were both arrested on corruption charges.

“I’m here, I’m the manager” – Moyes will not quit Sunderland

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This has been one horrible stretch for David Moyes.

The Sunderland manager probably thought he’d been through the worst once he left Real Sociedad, where he went 12-15-15.

But he’s managed just seven wins and seven draws in 38 matches in charge of the Black Cats — an 18 percent win mark. He’s also been charged for threatening to slap a female journalist.

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And after Wednesday, Moyes has lost both of his derby matches against Middlesbrough.

Sunderland is 12 points back of safety with five matches left. The odds the Black Cats are headed for the Championship are somewhere north of 99 percent, and fans are calling for his job.

Well, he isn’t quitting. From the BBC:

“No, I’m here, I’m the manager, you take it on the chin. … I’m a football supporter, I know what it’s like. You don’t like seeing your team lose.

“There is nobody who wants to win more than me. I am used to winning, I’m not used to losing and I don’t want to get used to it either.”