Referee Proenca shows red card to Borussia Dortmund's Weidenfeller during their Champions League Group F soccer match against Napoli in Naples

UEFA Champions League Roundup: Messi lifts Barça, Chelsea issued wake up call (Video)

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Where Tuesday had a flurry of goals, Wednesday had talking points. A game-changing red card in Napoli. And own-goal decider late in Milan. Another Messi hat trick in Barcelona. And, of course, Chelsea being upset at home. It was those headline events that took the place of Tuesday’s glut of goals, helping to round out an encouraging start to UEFA’s marque tournament.

But whereas yesterday’s action was also defined by the imposing power of some of Europe’s elites, today’s most notable performances came from a trio of big clubs few would put among the Real Madrids and Manchester Uniteds of the world: Napoli won the day’s big game, knocking off German leaders Borussia Dortmund; Schalke continued their resurgence with a three-goal win at home; while Atlético Madrid showed they may be Group G’s favorites.

[MORE: Tuesday UCL roundup: Upsets make way for goals.]

[MORE: Dortmund left to fight back down a player, coach.]

Here’s what else happened as Wednesday’s action rounded out match day one of UEFA Champions League:

Group E: Chelsea (England) 1-2 Basel (Switzerland) [RECAP]

In time, when Chelsea’s going through to the knockout round at the top of this group, we may see this result as the cold shower the Blues needed to awaken their season. Right now, however, it’s a reminder that talent alone does not win games. There was no question who had the better players, with Chelsea able to hold 57 percent of the ball while outshooting their opposition. But come the 71st minute, there were doubts as to who would win this game. When Marco Stellar’s winner built on Mohamed Salah’s opener, Basel had the competition’s first shock result.

[MORE: Basel records first major upset of Champions League season.]

Group E: Schalke (Germany) 3-0 Steaua Bucharest (Romania)

The Romanian champions held out for 67 minutes before the reality of their situation became apparent. They are the underdogs in Group E, and against one of the two teams who will compete for second behind Chelsea (or, perhaps more after today’s result), Steaua saw how little margin for error they have. When their defense misjudged a cross with 23 minutes to play, Atsuto Uchida scored an unlikely opening goal.  Eleven minutes later, the threat of the Julian Draxler-Kevin Prince Boateng combination was made clear, as the young German set up Prince’s score. Then, in the 85th minute, Draxler added one of his own, completing Steaua’s rude awakening.

Group F: Napoli (Italy) 2-1 Borussia Dortmund (Germany) [RECAP]

Napoli were deserved winners, using goals from Gonzalo Higuaín and Lorenzo Insigne to outweigh Juan Camilo Zuñiga’s late own goal, but this is a match the viewers may wish had played out differently. Near the end of a quality first half that saw only Higuaín’s 29th minute header separate the sides, Dortmund keeper Roman Weidenfeller was sent off for a hand ball outside the box. The call was the correct one (Pedro Proença had to make it), but it still ruined what could have been the best match of the young European season.

[MORE: Napoli take full points from short-handed Dortmund.]

Group F: Marseille (France) 1-2 Arsenal (England)

A strong Arsenal start gave way to an even first half, with Marseille the slightly better side come halftime. The Gunners, however, found their stride in the second, Theo Walcott hammering home the opener after Jérémy Morel’s failed clearance before Aaron Ramsey notched his sixth goal of the season (seriously: six). The Welsh midfielder gave one back late, his penalty leading to Jordan Ayew’s 93rd minute conversation, but comfortably ahead by the time l’OM pulled one back, Arsenal posted an impressive opening round result.

Group G: Atlético Madrid (Spain) 3-1 Zenit St. Petersburg (Russia)

Subtly, this was a very impressive performance from Atlético, particularly since Zenit coach Luciano Spalletti employed a bit of a gambit to slow them down, surprisingly going three-at-the-back. The setup, however, seemed to overlook the fact Atlético, because of the suspension to Diego Costa, were unlikely to go 4-4-2, Diego Simeone conceding before the match that Adrían’s inclusion would change their formation. With only David Villa up top, Atlético were able to undo Spalletti’s plans, getting goals from Miranda, Koke, and Leo Bapistao en route to an impressive victory.

Group G: Austria Wein (Austria) 0-1 FC Porto (Portugal)

Wein coach Nenad Bjelica spent the buildup to this match explaining a vast difference in the clubs’ resources means nothing once the match starts. And in the first half, he was right. Much like Chelsea-Basel, you could see which side had to more talented players, but Wein were generating all the opportunities despite only seeing 34 percent of the ball. Ten minutes into the second half, however, Lucho Gonzalez, a player the Austrians could not dream of affording, finished a Danil cross for the game’s only goal, one of only two shots the Portuguese champions managed on Heinz Lindner.

Group H: Barcelona (Spain) 4-0 Ajax (Netherlands) [RECAP]

Three more Champions League goals from Lionel Messi (and one for good measure from Gerard Piqué) gave Barcelona a result many would have predicted, especially after a penalty kick allowed the hosts to take an early lead. After that score, Ajax loosen up and gained a greater place in the match, forcing Victor Valdes into a number of good saves (including one from the spot). Ultimately, however, this was a pretty typical performance for Barcelona at home in Champions League.

From PST’s Steve Davis, on Barcelona and the team that inspired the Catalans’ style:

Indeed, they may be stylistic kindred spirits, having birthed their games through some of the same tactical DNA, but Barca and Ajax are hardly playing the same game these days. (Haven’t been for a while, in fact.) Ajax players, gifted as they are, just cannot match Barca’s technical aptitude nor the collective wit – especially not when playing as the visitors in Catalonia.

[MORE: Messi hat trick decides battle of kindred spirits]

[MORE: Looking at the updated Champions League scoring chart.]

Group H: Milan (Italy) 2-0 Celtic (Scotland)

Max Allegri’s team were the better side throughout, but against a team with Celtic’s well-established counter attacking prowess, the 0-0 halftime scoreline was a dangerous one. Eight minutes from time, when it looked like Celtic (who finished the match without a shot on goal) were going to salvage a draw, Emilio Izaguirre inadvertently undid his team’s hopes, deflecting a Cristián Zapata shot home for the game’s opening goal. Sulley Muntari would add insurance four minutes from time to give a depleted Milan a deserved three points.

Winter on Allardyce corruption allegations: “Touch and go whether he survives”

England international soccer team manager Sam Allardyce, centre, his assistant Sammy Lee, left, and FA chief executive Martin Glenn, right, applaud during the launch event of UEFA Euro 2020 and the unveiling of the tournament brand and the London host city logo at City Hall, in London, Wednesday Sept. 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
AP Photo/Tim Ireland
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As details continue to unfold from the Telegraph’s sting operation that may’ve caught England manager Sam Allardyce in its grasp, the question of whether the ex-Sunderland man could be fired after just months on the job is moving to the forefront.

Allardyce, 61, is on tape talking about third party ownership of players — a big no-no for FIFA — and the words have some alleging that he is giving advice on how to buck the system.

[ MORE: Watford’s Deeney rages after loss]

Given that the manager has only overseen one match for the Three Lions and had been accused, but never charged, with accepting bribes from agents in 2006, some think he may not survive the issue.

Well-connected The Times of London writer Henry Winter says it’s possible.

Liverpool’s Jurgen Klopp pulls the rug out from armchair tacticians

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Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp spent time on Sky Sports’ Monday Night Football set for Burnley’s 2-0 win over Watford, and proffered some fascinating comments.

The ones that had us quite delighted were some dismissive comments aimed at people who like talk about, even lament, the Reds’ “false nines” — boiled to its bone, an advanced attacking mid that assumes the striker’s role.

[ MORE: Allardyce in hot water ]

After all, most times a 4-5-1 and a 4-1-4-1 are essentially the same thing (and perhaps dictated more by how a match plays out). And when Liverpool is using Daniel Sturridge, Roberto Firmino, or Divock Origi, it’s the player that matters as much as the formation (USMNT fans can consider how Bobby Wood and Clint Dempsey rotated around the top of Jurgen Klinsmann’s formation at the Copa America despite having a traditional given position in the Starting XI).

“To be honest, I don’t think about us having now a false nine or no nine or whatever it is. These players are all responsible for being in the opposition box in all situations there can be. “

Right. If an attack is moving ahead with just one man sitting high, that most advanced attacker is a forward. It doesn’t matter if that attacker has drifted out left on defense, or checked deeper into the formation when the other team has the ball. He’s a striker.

“A lot of people have got different views on it. Where’s the difference between 4-1-4-1 and 4-5-1, I don’t see it really.

“4-3-3, it depends on the situation you are in. For example, if you play a 4-3-3 with real wingers, like Holland played a few years ago, then it is different.”

Presumably, Klopp is speaking of the 4-3-3 employed by Louis Van Gaal at the 2014 World Cup in Brazil. Arjen Robben, Wesley Sneijder, and Robin Van Persie forced defenses to stretch wide as well as long, and that is a genuine 4-3-3. It’s much different than an average formation graphic showing three players high and three players low. The spacing of the opposition and movement of the ball match demands that!

Tactics and techniques are a lot of fun to discuss and debate, but Klopp reminded us a fact that plays out in almost every match. Most times, when the ball is kicked in anger, it’s “about Jims and Joes, not X’s and O’s” as former University at Buffalo and current Canisius College men’s basketball coach Reggie Witherspoon liked to say.

England: Allardyce in hot water after controversial Telegraph report

LONDON, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 21:  England manager Sam Allardyce and his assistant Sammy Lee listen to speakers during the UEFA EURO 2020 launch event for London at City Hall on September 21, 2016 in London, England.  (Photo by Dan Istitene/Getty Images)
Photo by Dan Istitene/Getty Images
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Sam Allardyce might be in a bit of trouble.

The England manager has been “caught” on tape by undercover Telegraph reporters in what’s being called a sting. Some of the banter is simply Allardyce being Allardyce — ripping on personalities he doesn’t like — and won’t affect much at all.

[ MORE: Watford’s Deeney rages after loss ]

Being outspoken isn’t a crime, after all. Other talk, though, could be quite damaging to the ex-Sunderland and Bolton boss. Allardyce reportedly flirted with getting big money to speak to a company that would be pitching third party ownership of players, which is strictly prohibited by FIFA.

From The Telegraph:

He agreed to travel to Singapore and Hong Kong as an ambassadorand explained to the “businessmen” how they could circumvent Football Association rules which prohibit third parties “owning” players.

Unbeknown to Allardyce, the businessmen were undercover reporters and he was being filmed as part of a 10-month Telegraph investigation that separately unearthed widespread evidence of bribery and corruption in British football.

The article is a part of an investigation the Telegraph claims will cause many problems for some big names in England over the coming days.

It could all come to nothing, though reports below show the Football Association will look into the Telegraph’s claims.

Watford’s Deeney raging after loss: “We got bullied to a man”

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Watford’s spirits have gone from the penthouse to outhouse in barely a week.

The Hornets hammered Manchester United last week only to look listless against Burnley at Turf Moor on Monday.

[ MATCH RECAP: Burnley 2-0 Watford ]

Outshone under the bright lights of Monday Night Football, Watford captain Troy Deeney is, in a word, angry.

From the BBC:

“Poor. I’ll have to watch my words or I’ll get in trouble. We got bullied to a man, Burnley stuck to their gameplan, fair play to them.

“We lost 2-0 on TV, we got run over and both goals could have been avoided. I’m very disappointed. You set high standards and if you don’t match them people will ask questions.”

With Bournemouth, Middlesbrough, Swansea City, and Hull City next on its Premier League docket, this is not a time for Watford to accept inconsistency.

To a man.