Labourers work at the construction site of Qatar Foundation headquarters in Doha

Qatar World Cup horror, as 4,000 migrants could be ‘worked to death’


The reasons against a World Cup in Qatar just keep stacking up, and this latest news is perhaps the most controversial of them all.

After reports surfaced earlier this week about the poor working conditions for construction workers in Qatar, NBC News understands that as many as 4,000 migrant workers could die as the tiny Arab nation kicks on with its construction efforts ahead of the 2022 World Cup.

Many outlets have cited Qatar’s “appalling labor abuses” and want more to be done about the huge influx of workers — between 500,000 and 1 million —  who will be brought in from Nepal, India and other South Asian and African countries to complete infrastructure for the tournament, the ITUC said. This vast number of overseas workers represents a workforce increase of 50 percent.

“More than 4,000 workers risk losing their life over the next seven years as construction for World Cup facilities gets under way if no action is taken to give migrant workers’ rights,” ITUC General Secretary Sharan Burrow said in a statement.

“The annual death toll among those working on building sites could rise to 600 a year -– almost a dozen a week –- unless the Doha government makes urgent reforms.”

(MORE: Qatar hits back, “It’s the right place to host 2022 World Cup”)

Following this recent allegations and the reports being made public, soccer’s world governing body, FIFA, is looking into the situation in Qatar. While many will argue that migrant workers carrying out their job in harmful conditions is something that comes with hosting a World Cup, Olympic Games or other events, it shouldn’t be that way. Not at all.

The international soccer players’ union, FIFPro, said it was “deeply alarmed” by the reports, and called on the Qatari authorities to allow inspections.

Already there is huge resistance to a World Cup in Qatar, as European league are unwilling to switch their schedule for a Winter World Cup, while FIFA’s own doctors have raised concerns about the searing temperatures that reach above and beyond 120 degrees during the summer. Those figured have prompted FIFA President Sepp Blatter to push for a winter tournament but many believe this makes the original decision in 2010 to award Qatar the prestigious tournament, was a huge mistake.

(MORE: ‘Mistake’ FIFA President Sepp Blatter admits Qatar error)

With Qatari officials staying defiant over a summer World Cup in dangerous conditions, FIFA unsure what action to take and now the lives of thousands of migrant workers being put at risk to get the tournament up and running, where will this all end?

The tragic death of Christian “Chuco” Benitez occurred in the heat of the Qatari summer back in August, and then there are the lengthy allegations that Qatari officials bribed many FIFA officials and other influential member of the soccer world, to ensure they won the rights to host the 2022 tournament.

(MORE: Tragedy strikes as Christian Benitez, 27, dies in Qatar)

Is it time to take the tournament away from Qatar? Or should it simple be switched to the winter and all of those other concerns be forgotten?

FIFA and the soccer nations of the world have some serious thinking and talking to do between now and 2022, because this situation will only get worse before it gets better.

Ferguson still being asked about Moyes: “We chose a good football man”

David Moyes Alex Ferguson
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In some ways absence makes the heart grow fonder, but it seems Sir Alex Ferguson‘s life after Manchester United has been filled with second guessing.

Whether the sales of Paul Pogba and Gerard Pique or the appointment of David Moyes, “Fergie” apparently can’t rest on his title-winning laurels.

[ MORE: Tax evasion charges dropped against Messi, but not his father ]

One thing that seems to bug him more than anything, though, is the idea that he hand-picked David Moyes to be his successor, and should be responsible for his failings.

In a new documentary, Ferguson both defends the appointment of Moyes and explains the process behind his choice.

From the BBC:

“I don’t think we made a mistake at all. I think we chose a good football man,” Ferguson says. “Unfortunately it didn’t work for David.

“Jose Mourinho was going back to Chelsea, Carlo Ancelotti was going to Real Madrid, Jurgen Klopp had signed a contract with Dortmund, Louis Van Gaal was staying with Holland for the World Cup.”

The article also makes another key point, according to Ferguson: the manager claims he only gave United a few months notice that he’d be stepping down. That certainly didn’t provide a lot of lead time to secure a big boss.

What do you make it of it? If your answer is, “When can we stop talking about Moyes and United?” I tend to be with you, but it’s a talking point.

Tax evasion charges against Messi dropped; Case vs father continues

FILE - In this Sept. 27, 2013 file photo, Barcelona F.C. star Lionel Messi, left, arrives at a court to answer questions in a tax fraud case in Gava, near Barcelona, Spain. Barcelona prosecutors are calling for the arrest of Messi's father in a tax fraud case. Prosecutors have cleared Messi of wrongdoing but are seeking an 18-month prison sentence for his father, Jorge Horacio Messi, for allegedly defrauding Spain's tax office of 4 million euros ($4.5 million) in unpaid taxes from 2007-09. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti, File)
AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti
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Lionel Messi will not face charges that he and his father defrauded the government in millions of unpaid taxes, though his father is not so lucky.

Messi’s father, Jorge, could face 18 months in jail and an approximate $2.25 million fine despite a voluntary payment of $5.5 million in 2013 to “correct” the missed taxes.

[ WATCH: Hilarious spoof pegs Messi, Ronaldo as “Friends” ]

The Barcleona star had plead ignorance to the charges, something that failed to impress prosecutors. But, it apparently worked out in his favor on Tuesday.

From the BBC:

Prosecutors allege that Jorge avoiding paying tax on his son’s earnings by using offshore companies in Belize and Uruguay between 2007 and 2009.

Messi’s lawyers argued that the player had “never devoted a minute of his life to reading, studying or analysing” the contracts, El Pais newspaper reported.