Qatar's Emir Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al Thani and his wife Sheikha Moza Bint Nasser al-Misnad hold a copy of the World Cup trophy after the awarding of the 2022 World Cup. The event marked the first time a World Cup finals was awarded to a nation in the Middle East - the second time the event will take place in the Asian confederation (Japan-South Korea 2002).

FIFA on 2022 World Cup: No decision before 2014 tournament


On Friday morning FIFA President Sepp Blatter has revealed that a special committee has been organized to try and tackle the scheduling options available for the 2022 World Cup in Qatar.

What took you so long?

With fans, officials, players and managers up in arms about playing in the intense heat of the Qatari summertime, many are clambering for a switch to a Winter World Cup. So FIFA has to decide to consult medial experts, media, influential European leagues and sponsors, to come to a compromise.

We need to carry out very deep consultations and investigations and show some diplomacy and wisdom,” Blatter said following a two-day meeting in Zurich. “World Cup 2022 will be played in Qatar. There you have it. About the heat, you’re entirely right, and I indeed say that we should have spoken about heat before, and in the bid documents it clearly said that it was hot in Qatar.”

Recently Qatar has also come under intense scrutiny about abusing labor laws and putting the lives of migrant workers in harm as they rush to build the new stadiums.

“As to the working conditions,” Blatter said. “Throughout the world, this is not Fifa’s remit. We cannot assume the duty of supervising security in building sites. As to what has happened now, of course we’re not indifferent to that. It does concern us and for this reason a trip to Qatar is now planned.”

Earlier Friday, FIFA Vice President Jeffrey Webb said, “I don’t think there should be a decision today. We definitely have not been presented with an analysis. We don’t know where the stakeholders are, so I think it would be irresponsible for us to take a decision today.”

Leader of the Asian Football Confederation, Sheikh Salman bin Ibrahim al-Khalifa, will lead the investigation.

It seems as though almost every day more pressure is mounting against the 2022 World Cup in Qatar.

Today is no different, as Premier League managers have lined up in opposition of the event. Many fear a switch to the Winter would throw up plenty of logistical issues for soccer leagues across the globe, especially Europe.

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Moyes believes changing to Winter World Cup in 2022 is the only option.

Manchester United manager David Moyes is the latest leading figure to call for the World Cup to be switched. Moyes believes there’s no way it can take place in the summer, and changes will need to be made to the English domestic competitions.

“I think there would be no choice that it would have to move,” Moyes said. “Maybe you’ll need to get rid of FA Cup replays and limit the League Cup, maybe something along those lines.”

Moyes also believes English soccer would be affected for a long time around the much-maligned World Cup.

“I think things would need to be altered in the year before and the year after, certainly,” Moyes said. “I’m sure the Premier League and others are already starting work on that and thinking about it. It does look as though it is going to have to be changed. If it was played in January it could be the equivalent to having a winter break. That would obviously extend things. I’m sure the people in power will try to make the right decisions.”

Elsewhere in the Premier League, Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger had his say on FIFA ExCo. looking into the possibilities of a Winter World Cup.

“To me it looks reasonable to play in the winter,” Wenger said. “Because the only thing that matters is the safety of the supporters who go there and attend the games. The players can cope with the heat because they are prepared. They will be in great condition.”

But should there be a new vote on the host for the 2022 World Cup given all of the unrest so far? Wenger doesn’t think so/

“No, unless there are some irregularities proven,” Wenger said. “But if nothing irregular has happened, why should you re-vote? You have to respect the vote and adapt the situation.”

EURO 2016: Who’s headed to France?

PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC - OCTOBER 10: Volkan Sen of Turkey in action during the UEFA EURO 2016 Group A Qualifier match between Czech Republic and Turkey at Letna Stadium on October 10, 2015 in Prague, Czech Republic. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
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The group stage of qualification is complete, as 20 teams have clinched a berth at EURO 2016, which kicks off next summer in France.

The top-two finishers in each group automatically qualified, as did the best third-place side out of all the groups (Turkey). France qualified automatically as the host nation.

[ MORE: EURO 2016 roundup ]

That leaves eight third-place teams to battle for the final four spots through a play-off. The draw for the matchups will take place on October 18, and those matches will be held from November 12-17 as a home-and-home play-off.

Group A

  1. Czech Republic
  2. Iceland
  3. Turkey (automatically qualified as best third-place side)

Group B

  1. Belgium
  2. Wales
  3. Bosnia and Herzegovina (qualified for play-off)

Group C

  1. Spain
  2. Slovakia
  3. Ukraine (qualified for play-off)

Group D

  1. Germany
  2. Poland
  3. Republic of Ireland (qualified for play-off)

Group E

  1. England
  2. Switzerland
  3. Slovenia (qualified for play-off)

Group F

  1. Northern Ireland
  2. Romania
  3. Hungary (qualified for play-off)

Group G

  1. Austria
  2. Russia
  3. Sweden (qualified for play-off)

Group H

  1. Italy
  2. Croatia
  3. Norway (qualified for play-off)

Group I

  1. Portugal
  2. Albania
  3. Denmark (qualified for play-off)

EURO 2016: Dutch disaster as Netherlands fail to qualify

AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS - OCTOBER 13:  Robin van Persie of the Netherlands (19) reacts during the UEFA EURO 2016 qualifying Group A match between the Netherlands and the Czech Republic at Amsterdam Arena on October 13, 2015 in Amsterdam, Netherlands.  (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
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The group stage of qualifying for the 2016 European Championship has come to a close, and one of the top teams in the world will not be playing in France next summer.

Netherlands 2-3 Czech Republic

The Netherlands finished second at the 2010 World Cup and third at the 2014 World Cup, but have failed to qualify for EURO 2016. Playing in front of a home crowd in a must-win match against the Czech Republic, the Dutch got off to a dreadful start, falling behind 2-0 as manager Danny Blind was forced to make a substitution within the opening 40 minutes. The Czech Republic was sent to ten men before the break, but an own-goal from Robin Van Persie made it 3-0 as the Dutch couldn’t recover. A disastrous result for the Netherlands, as big changes will surely come from the top down.

[ RELATED: David de Gea fighting for starting goalkeeper position with Spain ]

Italy 2-1 Norway

Italy finishes atop Group H without a loss after defeating Norway 2-1 today. Norway took the lead through Norwich City’s Alexander Tettey, but late goals from Alessandro Florenzi and Southampton’s Graziano Pelle gave the Italians all three points.

Malta 0-1 Croatia

With Norway’s loss, Croatia jumped into second place in Group H and secured qualification to EURO 2016 with a 1-0 win away at Malta. Inter Milan’s Ivan Perisic scored the game’s only goal, as Croatia advances despite having one point deducted due to inappropriate actions from their fans.

Elsewhere in EURO qualifying

Group A

Turkey 1-0 Iceland
Latvia 0-1 Kazakhstan

Group B

Belgium 3-1 Israel
Wales 2-0 Andorra
Cyprus 2-3 Bosnia and Herzegovina

Group H

Bulgaria 2-0 Azerbaijan