Jack Wilshere, Kevin Pietersen, and national identity: Some issues just aren’t in an athlete’s domain

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Like the rest of the athletic world, professional soccer’s culture remains one rife with latent sexism and homophobia. The casual language of this male-dominated world persists with identifying weakness as a feminine quality (don’t be such a girl/women/[worse]). Casually, jokingly questioning another’s heterosexuality is still done for comedic effect. Soccer remains a reflection of a maturing society, one where the Robbie Rogers and Megan Rapinoes of the world are only now starting to influence people’s opinions. Though there are a lot of intelligent people in the game, the game itself is not a breeding ground for enlightened social thought.

In that context, it shouldn’t be surprising that one athlete’s view on an equally complex topic lacks nuance. Jack Wilshere’s view of national identity apparently does. England is for English players — a clumsily opined response to Adnan Januzaj’s status — but in a country with a long history of immigration (and a liberal attitude toward political refugees), it’s unclear what that definition means. Do you need to be born in England? What about the broader United Kingdom? Or is there an age threshold past which you can no longer be English? What’s necessary and what’s sufficient to make an English person English?

(If you’re unfamiliar with the Adnan Januzaj situation, the link below should help you:)

[MORE Jack Wilshere sparks debate: Should Adnan Januzaj be allowed to play for England?]

It’s difficult to blame Wilshere for his lack of nuance because there’s really no right answer to this question. Much more learned people than Wilshere (or myself) are still debating the issue, making professional footballers (and obscure bloggers) strange points of reference. In a world where globalization’s forcing us to reconsider identity — where so many political  refugees without any sense of nationalism are left seeking new countries to call home — who cares what the Jack Wilsheres of the world have to say?

Right now, one country’s loophole is another’s open door. Even within the same nation, the standards change; sometimes, conveniently so.

Take England’s cricket team, which has taken the open door approach, something that’s helped fuel their rise to second in the International Cricket Council’s Test ranking. Among the 34 players the team’s used in the last year, 13 of them were born outside of England. Eight are form South Africa, with Barbabos, Ireland, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, and Zimbabwe each contributing one player to the squad.

That diversity may explain why one of the South Africa cricketers, South African-born Kevin Pietersen (no stranger to his own controversy), took to Twitter to question Wilshere’s stance:

[tweet https://twitter.com/KP24/status/387964147277004801] [tweet https://twitter.com/KP24/status/387968707919888384] [tweet https://twitter.com/JackWilshere/status/387969259172671488]

Wilshere ended his day with a few attempted clarifications:

[tweet https://twitter.com/JackWilshere/status/388035564223873025] [tweet https://twitter.com/JackWilshere/status/388036249367617536] [tweet https://twitter.com/JackWilshere/status/388036996310269952] [tweet https://twitter.com/JackWilshere/status/388037312674025472]

[MORE: Jack Wilshere denies singling out Adnan Januzaj, insists ‘Engand should be pick English players’]

Wilshere’s third tweet of the sequence helps narrow down his view, but the most telling tweet of the exchange my have been Pietersen’s first response to Wilshere. From a man who moved to England as a 17-year-old (making his international debut at 24), the sentiment revealed the emotion many immigrants feel. How is Jack Wilshere to say whether Pietersen’s English or not? And how can any person tell someone without a national identity that they can never truly be a part of their adopted country?

At this point, much of the English sporting public have accepted what’s happened with the cricket team. Perhaps that’s a result of the squad’s success, but it may also reflect a more globalized view of what nationalism can be. Given Pietersen was actually one year older than Januzaj when the two came to England (Januzaj came to train at Manchester United at 16), Wilshere’s view looks even more precarious. Broader, national standards run contrary to the English midfielder’s stance.

source:
England cricket star Kevin Pietersen is in his 10th year as an England international, holding records for fastest English century and fastest batsman to reach 1,000 and 2,000. On Wednesday on Twitter, the South Africa-born batsman question Jack Wilshere’s views on English identity.

There are two important differences between Pietersen and Januzaj, though. First, Pietersen has and English mother, something that made him immediately eligible for the national team. Januzaj was born in Belgium, is Albanian by ethnicity, is eligible to play for Serbia and, if Kosovo were every recognized by FIFA, would have a fourth country from which to choose. Without an English parent, his England claim would be based on residency alone.

All of which brings us back to identity. On a personal level, Januzaj may not feel Albanian, Belgian, Kosovar or Serbian, and having spent the most important years of his life in England, perhaps he would develop a national identity by the time he’s 22 – when he would be eligible to play for the Three Lions. Just as Pietersen felt more English in the face of South Africa’s politics, Januzaj by see himself as English for his own, personal reasons.

Contrary to what Wilshere implies in one of his tweets, the second major difference between Pietersen and Januzaj shouldn’t matter. That a person’s a footballer, not a cricketer, should be irrelevant. We may not yet know exactly how to define a person’s identity, but it certainly can’t be dependent on whether you play one sport instead of another. Let it come down to personal preference if need be (something that admittedly leaves potential to be abused for sporting reasons), but certainly don’t let sport decide who are you and who you are not.

When it comes to national identity, I don’t have the answers. Clearly, neither does Jack Wilshere. And nobody expects him to have them. So within reason, why do we care what he has to contribute to the conversation? Perhaps he has surprisingly enlightened things to say on other topics, at which time we can talk about them, but this clearly isn’t one of them. Is anybody’s view on English identity going to be influenced by what Jack Wilshere had to offer?

Let’s hope not. And let’s also hope that, in time, we can agree: Athletes may not be the best source for nuanced social commentary. There will always be except to that rule, but we need to get away from any standard that assumes an athlete’s view on such a complex issue is worth this level of consideration.

There are a lot of smart people in the world who may be able to identify what being English really means. Jack Wilshere’s not one of them. And nobody should have expected him to be.

Mourinho: “Paul made a big effort”

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Manchester United manager Jose Mourinho had fine words for Paul Pogba, but was tickled by the performance of 21-year-old Scott McTominay in the Red Devils scoreless draw with Sevilla in the UEFA Champions League on Wednesday.

[ RECAP: Sevilla 0-0 Man Utd ]

The visitors emerged unscathed, though without an away goal, and Mourinho raised eyebrows when he kept Pogba on the bench to start the match. The young McTominay started the match, and was paired with Pogba once Ander Herrera left the match with injury.

When a reporter asked Mourinho about McTominay after the match, the boss asked if he could give the reporter a hug before elaborating (via the BBC):

“In the press conference, the questions were about Paul [Pogba] but the question should be about the kid. He was fantastic. He did everything well. He put pressure on Ever Banega and stopped him playing, he’s their playmaker. I think Scott was brilliant.

“I think Paul made a big effort to try to give the team what I asked of him. Paul replaced Ander, he tried to bring to the game the same kind of qualities. He lost a couple of possessions but he also gave us stability because we had a good percentage of possession for the way we played.”

Mourinho was sure to include Nemanja Matic as a big part of the midfield trio.

The Pogba-Mourinho questions aren’t going to go away any time soon, though it should be noted — perhaps strongly — that the player was ill this weekend and United has to face Chelsea in Premier League play this weekend.

Still, he couldn’t help but mention how much he believes “Old Trafford has missed a big European night,” and how he’s looking forward to a potentially big win come March 13.

Nil-nil in Seville as De Gea stars

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  • English sides unbeaten vs. La Liga in UCL season (2-6)
  • Pogba subs into match for Herrera, 17′
  • De Gea with seven saves for United

David De Gea was the star as Manchester United escaped Sevilla with a scoreless draw in the first leg of the two sides’ UEFA Champions League Round of 16 tie.

[ MORE: Full lineups, stats, box score ]

Sevilla won a corner kick within 90 seconds, but the ball made its way through the 18 without finding a receiver.

Ander Herrera sprung Alexis Sanchez down the middle, but Jesus Navas cut across to catch the Chilean and thwart the United chance.

Navas then dragged a shot across goal and past a diving David De Gea but inches wide of the far post.

A Herrera injury — yes, another injury United supporters — meant Paul Pogba would join the fray after just 17 minutes with the key position in the 4-3-3.

Lukaku botched a terrific diagonal cross from Sanchez with a blast over the goal in the 25th minute.

The 38th minute saw Scott McTominay pump a ball right at Sergio Rico for the Sevilla backstop’s first save, and Angl Correa’s low shot was collected by De Gea for a third Red Devils save.

De Gea then made a leaping save on Steven N’Zonzi’s redirection of a bicycle kick just before halftime, and then slapped Luis Muriel’s header over the bar before the whistle.

[ MORE: Watch full PL match replays ]

[ MORE: Latest Premier League standings ]

De Gea nabbed another save, his sixth in the contest, when Clement Lenglet got his head on an Ever Banega free kick in the 64th minute.

A Sanchez giveaway provided Sevilla the chance to counter, and Muriel couldn’t get the step back needed to power a header past De Gea.

United had a goal pulled back in the 83rd minute as the ball struck Lukaku’s arm in the build-up.

Fred’s vicious free kick leads Shakhtar over Roma

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Facundo Ferreyra and Fred scored second half goals to lead Shakhtar Donetsk past AS Roma 2-1 at the Donbass Arena in Wednesday’s first leg of the clubs’ UEFA Champions League Round of 16 tie.

Cendig Under scored his fifth goal in four matches as AS Roma did manage an away goal before the March 13 second leg in Rome.

Fred has been linked with a summer move to Man City, and the banger of a free kick showed part of the reason the Brazilian is in demand.

[ MORE: Full lineups, stats, box score ]

Roma is bidding to make its first UEFA Champions League quarterfinal since 2007-08 when they went out at the hands of Manchester United, while Shakhtar last made the quarters only to be dismissed by Barcelona in 2010-11.

Ukrainian backstop Andriy Pyatov had an early save on Edin Dzeko off a cross from Aleksandar Kolarov, two minutes after Kolarov mailed a free kick over the bar.

Kolarov and Dzeko remained big parts of the story line, though Pyatov and the Shakhtar defense stood tall.

Dzeko would wind up assisting the opener, and it was the in form Under who’d bury his chance.

Not soon after the break, though, Yaroslav Rakitskiy cued up Ferreyra for the equalizer.

And Fred but the hosts ahead with this outstanding free kick, what they’d call a “bar down bingo” in hockey.

Madrid beats Leganes 3-1 in game postponed from December

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MADRID (AP) Real Madrid overcame the absence of Cristiano Ronaldo and other regular starters Wednesday, coming from behind to defeat Leganes 3-1 Wednesday in a Spanish league match postponed from last year.

The result allowed the defending champions to regain third place from Valencia, but it did little to put Zinedine Zidane’s team back in the title race as it still trails leader Barcelona by 14 points after 24 matches. Madrid is seven points behind second-place Atletico Madrid.

[ MORE: Messi defies Conte’s successful tactics ]

Less than a month ago, Leganes jolted Madrid into a crisis by eliminating the Spanish powerhouse from the quarterfinals of the Copa del Rey.

The hosts from southern Madrid went ahead less than 10 minutes into the match on Wednesday, but Madrid answered with first-half goals by Lucas Vazquez and Casemiro. Sergio Ramos sealed the victory by converting a 90th-minute penalty kick.

The league match was rescheduled from the 16th round because of Madrid’s participation in the Club World Cup in December, a competition it won.

Only in its second season in the first division, Leganes had a promising start to the campaign but has struggled recently. It hasn’t won in six matches and has lost four straight, dropping to 13th with 29 points.

Madrid has won four in a row, including 3-1 against Paris Saint-Germain in the last 16 of the Champions League last week.

Ronaldo, who scored twice against PSG and has 10 goals in his last six matches, was rested on Wednesday along with goalkeeper Keylor Navas. Marcelo, Toni Kroos and Luka Modric are trying to recover from injuries in time for next month’s return match against PSG in Paris.

Leganes opened the scoring with a goal by Unai Bustinza six minutes into the match at Butarque Stadium. The defender dived in front of the ball as Madrid left back Theo Hernandez tried to clear it from near the goal line. The ball ricocheted off Bustinza’s head and shoulder and went into the net.

Madrid equalized five minutes later with Vazquez’s low shot into the far corner from inside the area after a through ball by Casemiro, and 20 minutes later it was the Brazilian defensive midfielder who found the net from close range after a pass by Vazquez.

Ramos scored from the penalty spot after Mateo Kovacic was pushed inside the area in the closing minutes.

More AP Spanish soccer coverage: https://apnews.com/tag/LaLiga

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