Tab Ramos 2

With numerous MLS coaching vacancies, will there be a race for Tab Ramos?


If we include two clubs currently riding an interim manager, a trio of MLS coaching jobs are open today. Dallas is definitely open, while the deciders in Columbus and San Jose have choices to make on their interim men.

There could be as many as six other MLS managerial openings – and that’s being conservative. There may be more; the list of clubs with a coach on unstable footing includes Chicago, Chivas USA, D.C. United, New England, Philadelphia, Seattle, Toronto and Vancouver.

And that’s not including Real Salt Lake, where Jason Kreis is obviously safe and sound, but might still be kicking the tires on the soon-to-be New York City FC position. That would fling the office door open at Rio Tinto Stadium.

(MORE: The MLS coaching carousel is about to get crazy)

Clearly, if you are a good MLS coaching candidate, this is going to be a buyer’s market, so to speak.

And that brings me to Tab Ramos.

Others will find their way into the early coaching conversations to come. Red Bull assistant Robin Fraser, for instance, continues to be well thought of, regardless of what happened at Chivas USA. Seriously, no one has ever really excelled at Chivas USA, although some (Bob Bradley, Preki) managed some small progress, at least.

But Ramos may be the prize.

The former U.S. international midfielder – truly, quite the player back in the day, thoughtful, skilled and quick – is now the U.S. under-20 coach. Ramos, 47, has coaching experience, MLS experience as a player and a well-rounded variety of experiences in the game here and abroad.

Mostly, he has great ideas about player development. (Read about those in Paul Gardner’s recent, extensive conversation with Ramos). And player development, especially as MLS clubs’ academies continue to mature, will increasingly be a springboard to success. (That’s particularly true at clubs that cannot perennially flash the DP dollars and spend extravagantly on quality, tested internationals.)

Major League Soccer’s deciders see the great things going on with Caleb Porter in Portland and Oscar Pareja in Colorado. Both came from “youth” coaching backgrounds, Porter in the college system and Pareja with FC Dallas’ academy.

Kreis is also doing good things with player development, successfully and rather seamlessly replacing veteran stalwarts with “kids” this year in Utah.

Ramos has the same look and feel. And if I am an MLS owner, I am beating on Ramos’ door this morning.

Assuming the man is interested in MLS coaching, someone is going to get him. The smart MLS owner will be in the front of that line.

Jurgen Klopp announced as new Liverpool manager

Jurgen Klopp, Liverpool FC
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Enough with the speculation and reports already, because it’s finally officially official: Jurgen Klopp has been appointed the newest manager of Liverpool Football Club, the Merseyside club announced on Thursday.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s PL coverage ]

Klopp will be unveiled to the world at an introductory press conference at Anfield on Friday.

According to early reports, Klopp’s three-year contract could pay him as much as $10 million per season.

[ QUOTE KING: Top 10 “Klopp-isms” from his time at Dortmund ]

The 48-year-old German has been out of work since stepping down at Bundesliga side Borussia Dortmund following a seventh-place finish to the 2014-15 season. Klopp’s seven seasons in charge of Dortmund weren’t without success and silverware, though, as he led Der BVB to back-to-back league titles in 2011 and 2012, a German Cup triumph in 2012 and a UEFA Champions League final appearance in 2013.

PST’s Joe Prince-Wright will be at Anfield on Friday for Klopp’s unveiling, so be sure to follow JPW on Twitter and check back to PST for wall-to-wall coverage of Klopp’s first press conference as Liverpool manager.

Mourinho “working like never before” to turn Chelsea around

Jose Mourinho, Chelsea FC
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Jose Mourinho got the dreaded much-needed vote of confidence from Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich last weekend, seemingly giving the Portuguese manager a temporary stay of execution despite the Blues’ worst start to a season in 37 years.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s PL coverage ]

Speaking this week, Mourinho has revealed that while he’s thankful to have been kept on at the club for which he regularly professes his love, he still thinks it was no-brainer for Abramovich. In other words, Mourinho’s not backing down from his incredible, seven-minute rant to one question following Saturday’s defeat to Southampton.

Mourinho, on what he’s doing to turn Chelsea around — quotes from the Guardian:

“It shows the confidence of Abramovich in the manager who has won three Premier League titles with this club. I thank him and I keep working.

“What’s going on? I do not know. The results with Chelsea at the moment have been really bad. I cannot hide that reality, and I don’t want to. And I struggle to find an explanation. But I assure you: I’m working like never before and we will come out of this. And there is also the Champions League that we will not neglect, for certain.”

What did you expect from Mourinho? Well, you know, I should probably be fired, but thanks to Mr. Abramovich for not realizing this and keeping me employed? It’s simultaneously interesting and the least surprising thing ever, though, that Mourinho claims to not know what’s wrong with Chelsea at the moment. Of course he has a theory (or five), and of course he’s “working like never before” to correct it.

[ MORE: Ozil, Coquelin say Arsenal can win the title this season ]

The most fascinating thing about Chelsea’s sluggish start to the season is to see, hear and read Mourinho speaking from a position of powerlessness. Always the clever one, the one dictating where the discussion goes, the one in charge of every press interaction, Saturday’s rant felt like watching a desperate Mourinho grasping for anything by which to pull himself back up.