Manchester City goalkeeper Hart reacts after a Chelsea goal during their English Premier League soccer match at Stamford Bridge in London

Quick Six: Top stories from the Premier League weekend

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1. STUNNING ERROR COSTS MANCHESTER CITY AT CHELSEA

We know Joe Hart’s made worse mistakes this season, a perspective that leaves us looking for other answers after happened on Sunday. That’s when, near full time at Stamford Bridge, the England international came sprinting out of his box to play a ball near the edge of his penalty area. But with his Matija Nastasic on the scene, there was no need for him to come.

True, the Serbian international should have seen Hart coming and directed his header elsewhere, but City’s keeper shouldn’t have come.  Hart should have been waiting to receive his defender’s back-pass. Instead, he abdicated his goal ahead of Fernando Torres’s winner.

During NBC’s broadcast, Tim Howard was diplomatic about the error, placing blame on Hart but explaining it as a basic communication error that could happen to anybody. That seems too generous, perhaps a function of that implied goalkeepers’ fraternity that keeps number ones from being overly critical of each other. While that mistake could have happened to anybody, it would have been equally inexcusable from everybody, with the ability to correctly read the game in front of you a reasonable expectation of any Premier League goalkeeper.

Hart cost City a point at Stamford Bridge, giving a title rival two they would have otherwise been without. Would Costel Pantilimon have done the same? Or perhaps he would have be been worse in other areas – areas where Hart was fine on Sunday?

These are the basic questions Manuel Pellegrini needs to answer ahead of the January window, because even if he thinks Hart’s better than Pastilimon, England’s number one may not be better than another player City could get on the open market.

2. SUÁREZ STRENGTHEN’S CLAIM AS PREMIER LEAGUE’S BEST

This is why Luis Suárez’s transgressions spur so much discussion. He’s more than a troubled soul lashing out with a forked tongue and carnivorous intent. With Gareth Bale in Spain, Suárez is in a one-man discussion as the league’s most dangerous player, possessing an unmatched ability to single-handedly turn games.

Saturday was a perfect example. The Uruguayan international embarrassed Jonas Olsson on the first goal, nutmegging the Swede before beating Boaz Myhilll. His second was a perfectly played header from near the edge of the box, a snap decision that seemed to catch the West Brom keeper off guard. The third, a perfectly flicked header off a second half restart, was more defensive error than individual brilliance, yet it still highlighted an rarely discussed part of Suárez’s arsenal. At 5’11” (perhaps a generous listing), Suárez is an underappreciated asset in the air.

He’s like Sergio Agüero, except more explosive. He’s more relentless than Robin van Persie; more consistently lethal than Wayne Rooney. Second on the circuit in goals with only four games played, he is the Premier League’s best striker, with comparisons between him, Mesut Özil, and Yaya Touré coming down to esoteric arguments about positional value.

On Saturday, Suárez showed the value of having the league’s biggest threat, the kind of tactics-defying virtue you also see from the likes of Messi, Ronaldo, and Ibrahimovic. Perhaps Suárez isn’t quite in that class, but in the Premier League, he’s in a class by himself.

3. RIVALS PROVIDE ANOTHER REPRIEVE FOR SUNDERLAND

When spring doubts about Paolo Di Canio were echoing through Wearside, the short-lived Sunderland boss got a win over Newcastle. The 3-0 victory at St. James last April not only proved vital to the Black Cats’ survival but helped temporarily consolidate Di Canio’s position. Hindsight may see that as a steep price of a year’s survival, but it illustrates the power of the Tyne-Wear Derby. One win will gloss over a slew of evils.

Gus Poyet is riding that wave today, his second half sacrifice of Adam Johnson for Fabio Borini paying off when the Italian attacker fired home a late game-winner, giving Sunderland their first win of the year (2-1 over Newcastle). Only the second goal of his Premier League career, Borini rewarded Poyet’s risky move, the new Black Cats boss electing to play Borini, Steven Fletcher and Jozy Altidore together. But having seen Johnson’s defensive error lead to Newcastle’s only goal, perhaps the former Brighton boss felt there was nothing to lose.

It’s not unlike the broader state Poyet’s inherited. If he fails, people will blame Di Canio. If he succeeds, he’ll be viewed as a savior. He has nothing to lose, and given the depths to which Sunderland has descended, the new boss may be wise to take these kind of chances.

For the kind of momentum that can be claimed in a debry? It’s certainly worth it.

4. MOYES SUMMONS FERGUSON MAGIC IN UNITED’S WIN

Last week he was the anti-Ferguson, David Moyes seeing his team allow Southampton to come back and take a point at Old Trafford. Mid-week in Champions League, Manchester United tried to reproduce that result, though Real Sociedad never played their part. Between two close matches and their former manager’s naval-gazing book tour, it was another week that reminded Red Devils fans of what once was.

That’s why Saturday’s was such a breathe of fresh air. Instead of a day that reminded fans their team’s best performances can’t put teams away, the Red Devils came back from 2-1 down, rekindling hope some of Alex Ferguson’s mentality lingers in their DNA. If the squad can still turn water into wine, there may be hope for a title push.

It goes without saying that a team of United’s talent shouldn’t have this much trouble with Stoke City, particularly at home, but all clubs have off days. Whether this was a momentary downturn or part of a larger pattern is a bigger, more murky debate, but in isolation, the result wasn’t that bad. Three points rarely is.

Coming off a mid-week match in Champions League, United had more trouble than expected at home. They needed a late comeback to salvage a performance where they didn’t look themselves. If you had a nickle for each time that description could be applied in the Ferguson era, you’d might have enough money to buy his latest book.

5. ENDS JUSTIFY THE MEANS AT NORWICH

Saturday saw a Premier League goal disallowed despite no justification from the game’s laws, yet nobody seems concerned. It was a blatant abuse of an official’s power — the game’s lead arbiter taking it upon himself to fill a gap in the rules — yet the offended manager only made a minor complaint. Letter of the law, Chris Houghton’s Norwich City should have won on Saturday, Leroy Fer’s 94th minute shot into an empty net giving the Canaries a 1-0 win.

Thankfully, Mike Jones didn’t let that happen. Although the match’s lead official had no codified justification for his decision, the ends justified his means. WIth Cardiff City expecting the ball back after an injury saw them intentionally play the ball into touch, Jones wasn’t going to stand for Fer hitting Ricky Van Wolfswinkel’s throw-in into David Edwards’ open net. Helping to quell a potential melee at Carrow Road, Jones simply made it so Fer’s indiscretion never happened. The throw-in was retaking with the understanding Jones would have no part in Fer’s errant passes.

Putting aside Fer’s intent, the more interesting debate centers on the man in the middle. The injury pact between teams that sees possession restored after playing into touch is an implied agreement. If one team doesn’t want to be part of it, that should be within their right. It’s rude, obnoxious, potentially dangerous and counter productive, but so is Joey Barton, and we haven’t banned him. There’s a wide range of behaviors that are both possible and allowed by the rules.

Still, if I were in Jones’s shoes, I wouldn’t have done the same thing, though I wouldn’t be certain it was the right thing to do. I would wonder if a more nefarious official would abuse that discretion. Regardless, at some point, teams should be permitted to do what’s allowed within the rules.

Yet as long teams are expected to maintain this gentleman’s agreement, it’s nice to have a few Mike Joneses around.

6. SOUTHAMPTON CONTINUES FLASHING CONTENDER’S METTLE

Last week we highlighted Arsenal’s dominance of Norwich City as a sign of their maturation. In the same light, Southampton’s control of Fulham can be seen as a meaningful benchmark of their progress, even if the result wasn’t unexpected. If Arsenal’s ability to steer clear of potential pitfalls can be lauded, Saints’ ability to put the likes of Fulham out of reach can also be seen as a sign of the staying power.

It’s one thing to motivate yourself for derbies, and if you’re a middling side, getting up to face the league’s contenders is never a problem. But having the quality to consistently transcend the reach of the league’s talented-but- lesser teams is rare. While a team like Aston Villa can occasionally take down an Arsenal, they still stumble against the league’s mere morals.

With their win, Southampton’s now unbeaten in six, winning four in that span while climbing to fifth in the Premier League. Although they also posted multiple-goal victories over Swans and Palace, those results didn’t come after Saints claimed a result at Old Trafford. After getting an unexpected point on the road, Southampton didn’t hiccup. They kept on keeping on.

By now, their loss at Norwich seems so long ago. So does their draw with Sunderland. While those blemishes to relegation candidates are alarming, they’re also from August. Since, Southampton’s moved on. And up.

Kasper Schmeichel wants to play for Denmark 6 days after hernia surgery

LEICESTER, ENGLAND - AUGUST 27: Kasper Schmeichel of Leicester City in action during the Premier League match between Leicester City and Swansea City at The King Power Stadium on August 27, 2016 in Leicester, England.  (Photo by Michael Regan/Getty Images)
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Former Manchester United goalkeeper Peter Schmeichel was tough, but his son might be tougher.

Leicester City shot-stopper Kasper Schmeichel had hernia surgery earlier Monday, and while that seems like it would sideline him for some time, apparently not.

The 29-year-old tweeted from the hospital bed that he is aiming for a return on Sunday – just six days removed from surgery – when his native Denmark takes on Armenia in World Cup qualification.

That’s…ambitious. Not surprising though, given the ambition Leicester City showed last season stunning everyone to win the title.

Schmeichel was injured against Swansea on Saturday in Premier League play when he made a clearance and came up notably uncomfortable. He was replaced in the 57th minute by new Foxes signing Ron-Robert Zieler. According to manager Claudio Ranieri, the club had already planned surgery for this problem even before Saturday’s flare-up due to the recurring nature of the problem.

Sadly, the Wednesday’s friendly against Liechtenstein comes a little too soon for Schmeichel. It will be the first international match he will miss since March of 2015. We’ll give him a pass, considering most of us would still be in post-op then.

Report: Zardes injury is serious, broken foot could end his season

SEATTLE, WA - JUNE 16:  Gyasi Zardes #9 of the United States dribbles against Jefferson Montero #7 of Ecuador during the 2016 Quarterfinal - Copa America Centenario match at CenturyLink Field on June 16, 2016 in Seattle, Washington. The United States beat Ecuador 2-1.  (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)
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According to Goal.com’s Ives Galarcep, the injury that forced Gyasi Zardes to withdraw from USMNT consideration for the upcoming World Cup qualifiers is serious and could have much larger consequences.

Zardes reportedly suffered a broken right foot, and could not just miss the rest of the 2016 MLS season, but the rest of the calendar year, ruling him out of not just the two upcoming matches, but also the beginning of the Hexagonal in November should the U.S. advance to the next round.

The 24-year-old was injured just after halftime in an MLS match against Vancouver on Saturday, when he was brought down by Kendall Watson. It’s hard to see in full-speed what happens, but upon closer inspection, it appears that Watson’s follow-through catches the inside of Zardes’s right foot. He continued to play but looked less than healthy when he was finally substituted off in the 87th minute.

Zardes has been a rare youthful yet important cog in the USMNT machine the past few years. He played every minute of the Copa America run to the 3rd place match, and he has missed just two matches since making his debut in January of 2015, giving him 31 caps already despite a debut just 19 months ago.

The injury is also a serious blow for the LA Galaxy. Zardes had come onto the field in the 31st minute to replace an injured Steven Gerrard, and in-form defender Jelle van Damme had also departed the match with a knee ligament injury which will see him miss 2-3 weeks.

Michail Antonio thought he was being pranked when he got his England call-up

MANCHESTER, ENGLAND - AUGUST 28:  Michail Antonio of West Ham during the Premier League match between Manchester City and West Ham at Etihad Stadium on August 28, 2016 in Manchester, England.  (Photo by Gareth Copley/Getty Images)
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Many were surprised when they saw West Ham winger Michail Antonio on Sam Allardyce‘s first England squad list.

Including Michail Antonio.

In fact, Antonio admitted he thought he was being pranked, or at the very least, the butt of a joke. Then he saw the proof, and began to get emotional.

[ VIDEO: Premier League highlights

Speaking with the official England Instagram account, Antonio said, “So literally I’ve done an interview at the end of the game [West Ham’s 3-1 loss to Manchester City on Sunday] and then I’ve come in and the physio’s come over to me and gone ‘you’ve been called up.’ I was like ‘haha funny’ and he’s gone ‘no no seriously’ and I was like ‘good banter!'”

[ MORE: West Ham falls to Manchester City 3-1 ]

The 26-year-old said he stared at the physio for a good 30 seconds before he was shown the official paper, at which point he began “welling up.” The water works came soon after. “So I gave my missus a call, obviously she doesn’t pick up. And then I just got myself mentally ready and waited for it to come out.”

Antonio has two goals in three Premier League games this season, although he struggled in West Ham’s season opener against Chelsea when forced to deputize at right-back. The London-born winger has never played under Allardyce, having joined the Hammers just a few months after Big Sam’s departure from West Ham.

Earthquakes fire longtime general manager John Doyle

SANTA CLARA, CA - AUGUST 25: San Jose Earthquakes owner, John Doyle announces the San Jose Earthquakes new stadium ground breaking set for October 21st 2012 before the game between the Colorado Rapids and the San Jose Earthquakes at Buck Shaw Stadium on August 25, 2012 in Santa Clara, California. (Photo by Tony Medina/Getty Images)
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SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) — The San Jose Earthquakes fired longtime general manager John Doyle on Monday, replacing him with technical director Chris Leitch on an interim basis.

Coach Dominic Kinnear and his staff remain in place, the team said.

Doyle, who in 2005 was the inaugural member of the San Jose Earthquakes Hall of Fame, had been the general manager since October 2007 and helped bring the franchise back following a two-year absence. He is a former player, assistant coach and color analyst with the organization.

San Jose has a 7-8-11 record for seventh place in the Western Conference and was three points back of Portland for the final playoff berth.