Russia Soccer

Russia’s racism stems from lack of education but can be reversed, experts say


A violent and vocal minority continues to shape the way Russian soccer is viewed by outsiders. On Wednesday, just over a week after Manchester City midfielder Yaya Touré claimed he was subject to racist chants from CSKA Moscow fans in a UEFA Champions League game, 30 fans were arrested at a Russian Cup game.

A group at the match between Shinnik Yaroslavl and Spartak Moscow lit flares and threw them onto the field, along with stadium seats they ripped off the stand. A handful held corners of a flag bearing the German Nazi party’s swastika.

For the alleged events at Arena Khimki, UEFA decided to partially close the stadium for CSKA’s next home Champions League match, Nov. 27 against Bayern Munich. The punishment pales in comparison to rampant racism and xenophobia exhibited by that minority of Russian fans.

“The problem that you look at within Russian football is that there is almost an ignorance towards it, a defensive attitude towards it,” U.K.-based television commentator John Bradley said in a phone interview on Wednesday. “The clubs don’t feel that they should be punished for the behavior of a handful of fans.”

Bradley specializes in matches involving Russian teams, and his tweets are generally Russo-centric. Having followed the Russian Premier League for a long time, he said UEFA’s punishment in this case will do little to encourage clubs to curtail racist behavior among their fan groups, especially when the incident occurred during FARE Action Week, when each player in every Champions League starting lineup passed around a pennant that read “No to Racism” and stared into the television cameras with it before kickoff.

“Closing a few seats in the stadium isn’t going to help them at all — 4,000 seats in an 18,000-capacity stadium — because you look at the money you get for being in the Champions League, the win bonuses for being in the Champions League, the sponsorship and the TV revenue, that’s far greater than money you will lose for closing 4,000 seats,” he said. “Now, 4,000 people won’t be able to go to a game against the European champions. It’s a shame for the well-behaved supporters of CSKA, but UEFA need to start hitting clubs harder because 4,000 seats, for the money they’re losing, is negligible.”


Until the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, Russia was largely closed to outsiders. Citizens have yet to become accustomed to being around people of other ethnicities, and educational programs about racism and xenophobia are virtually nonexistent despite a large immigrant population.

source: Reuters
Zenit St. Petersburg fans have carved out a reputation as some of the most racist in Russia, especially after a major supporters’ group released a ‘manifesto’ lamenting the black players in the squad. (Photo: Alexander Demianchuk/Reuters)

“They’re not connected in any way, but the racism and xenophobia that you have against these immigrants then somehow translates over into acts of racism in the stands and the stadium,” said Yan Matusevich, a longtime Zenit St. Petersburg fan who recently took up blogging about the issue. “It’s not taught in schools. There’s no government program about it. Nobody’s telling them this is something that is deplorable at all. Nobody’s ever told them. They’ve never been faced with the fact that this is something that they shouldn’t be proud of.”

Matusevich said he cannot recall incidents of racism in the stands when he attended Zenit games as a child, but that was largely because “the most foreign player you would have would be a player from Ukraine.” When players from other continents began signing contracts with Premier League clubs, often with more lucrative pay than their Russian counterparts, fans began to take notice.

Zenit supporters’ group Landscrona wrote a “manifesto” in December 2012 espousing the “important tradition” of keeping black and foreign players off the squad. Based on the group’s publications and leader Aleksandr Rumyantsev’s words in local media, they don’t see it as racist but simply upholding the club’s historic customs.

Rumyantsev told Zenitbol that throwing a banana onto the field at Brazilian defender Roberto Carlos was nothing more than a poor joke. Landscrona found the person responsible and banned him from the group, he said.

“He said it was stupidity on his part,” Rumyantsev said. “He did not have any racism in the thought.”

But in the same interview, the leader continued to uphold the same type of ignorance in the manifesto.

“I was taught in school: the negro has to live in Africa; the Indian, if they were still there, in America; the Chinese, in Asia,” he said. “They visit each other’s homes. St. Petersburg is a city that was created to ensure that the tourists come here. I’m glad — but to go on a visit, not to bring his samovar and live by their own laws.”

Bradley equated the Russian status quo to the racist behaviors in British stadiums in the 1980s. A rigorous educational initiative has all but cleaned up that racism, led by similar far-right groups, but Russian society as a whole has not had time to catch up, he said.

“That’s not an excuse, and it’s not an apology for them, but they haven’t had that same work done with them,” he said. “It’s the responsibility of the Russian government, the Russian football federation, the clubs to now work with supporters, to speak with the supporters’ groups, to rid themselves of these people from the far-right persuasion who are still associating themselves with football clubs.”


The Russian Football Union, the national governing body of the game, has remained quiet on the racism among its clubs. The federation did not respond to email requests for an interview for this story.

“I’m wondering why they haven’t defended CSKA in this situation because I can easily imagine that, instead of accusing and doing something,” said Pavel Borisov, contributor to Russian Football News. “[Racism] happens in Russia not so often as somebody would imagine, but it happens.”

Instead of taking the opportunity to take a heavy stance, UEFA simply treated the events during the match against Manchester City as a one-off incident. New regulations stipulate that only a partial stadium closure is required for the first offense, followed by a full closure and a fine for the second offense and possible disqualification the third time.

The egregious nature of the events, capped by CSKA Moscow president Yevgeny Giner’s assertion that Touré fabricated his account of the incident, continue a troubling pattern that reaches across many of the widely followed clubs in the top flight.

In 2010, after Russian-raised Nigeria international Peter Odemwingie moved from Lokomotiv Moscow to West Bromwich Albion in England, fans unfurled a banner reading, “Thanks, West Brom” with a banana prominently displayed in the center. Alexei Sorokin, who headed up Russia’s successful 2018 FIFA World Cup bid, wrote it off as a misunderstanding and claimed the country had no widespread racism problem.

“Fans were not happy with the fact that he plays better for Nigeria and worse for the club. That’s why they have shown their satisfaction after he left. And there is nothing racial in it,” he told the BBC. “In Russia, ‘to get a banana’ means ‘to fail a test somewhere.’ ”


source: Getty Images
Around 30 fans were arrested at a Russian Cup game on Wednesday after crowd trouble that included a swastika flag in the stands. (Photo: STR/AFP/Getty Images)

For a nation hosting the World Cup in five years, the repeated behavior and lack of reprimand for clubs is troubling. Lokomotiv received no sanction for the Odemwingie banner. The player, who was eligible to represent Russia internationally, has since moved on to Cardiff City, but the problems persist.

“When I started thinking about African teams being based in different cities around Russia and playing there [and] how they’re going to deal with that, I’m scared of what’s going to happen,” Matusevich said. “They’re not accepting the issue. They want to sweep it under the rug and make believe it never happened.”

Bradley and Borisov equated the apprehension surrounding a Russian World Cup to the similar feeling when Poland and Ukraine hosted Euro 2012, which went off with hardly any trouble. Traveling Croatian fans provided the worst moment of the tournament when they racially abused Italian striker Mario Balotelli, but the hosts behaved themselves.

“I spent the summer in Kiev [and] didn’t see one incidence of it or one instance of racism whatsoever,” Bradley said. “When the world goes to Russia, we won’t see any problems because all eyes will be on them, and I think that by that time, they will be a better level of understanding.”

Borisov said his biggest fear is not of racism, but of widespread drug dealing and other criminal behavior.

“This is what I’m afraid of, that it could happen in Russia as well,” he said, “[but] I don’t think that there will be serious trouble because the World Cup is something very, very different.”

The focus between now and then must be on educating the fan base and eradicating the problem, not just for a month during one summer five years in the future, but to change the way Russians view foreigners and people of other ethnicities in everyday life.

Maybe by then, anti-immigrant rallies and violence will stop — or at least decrease drastically — and the play on the field can become the focus, rather than the action in the streets and the stands.

“They’ll probably try to ban the most hardcore fans from coming [to the World Cup] — they’re the ones that are the most racist — and just try to control the situation and the image that they’re sending,” Matusevich said, skeptically. “They’re not going to try to deal with the actual problem, and they’re not going to make any efforts to. It’s really about education. It’s not about punishing certain people or not letting certain people into the stands; it’s about changing the way people understand the world.”

Three things we learned from Leicester City vs. Man United

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Leicester City drew 1-1 with Manchester United on Saturday in a game dominated by one man: Jamie Vardy.

[ MORE: Twitter reacts to Vardy ]

He set a new record and the King Power Stadium erupted, while United and Leicester battled it out in a fair draw.

[ MORE: PL Saturday roundup ]

Here’s three things we learned from the KP.


He did it. Heading into this game all the talk was about Vardy and if the 28-year-old could set a new PL record of scoring in 11 consecutive games. Well, he did.

From Stocksbridge Park Steels, Halifax Town, Fleetwood Town and now Leicester City, Vardy has always scored goals but the one he scored against Manchester United on Saturday has placed him in the record books. Reacting to the feat live on Sky Sports after the game, Vardy rolled out the cliches but showed a little bit of emotion.

“I am obviously delighted but the main thing was the performance,” Vardy said. “I think we put a really good shift in today and a point was a fair result. We have a lot of pace in the team and counter attacking is a big advantage for us. We have come straight from a corner. It was unbelievable. I think I got a bit carried away with myself!”

When asked afterwards what he was shouting when wheeling away in celebration, Vardy said “I can’t repeat it to be honest with you” and then elaborated on what it has been like this week with the pressure on his shoulders.

“Obviously if I let it get to me then it will effect my performance so I’ve just been keeping my head down and not let it sink in my head and just concentrate on it and that it was just another game we wanted to get three points in,” Vardy added.

The next record for Vardy to break is from the 1931-32 English top-flight season. Before the PL was formed Sheffield United’s Jimmy Dunne scored in 12-straight games. Let’s see if Vardy can continue this incredible run when Leicester face Swansea City next Saturday, but all that matters right now is that he holds the record in the PL and has come from absolutely nowhere to do something no other player has done in PL history. Remarkable. Memorable. Magnificent.


Right on the stroke of half time the atmosphere fell a little flat at the KP as Bastian Schweinsteiger headed home to make it 1-1. After the euphoria of Vardy giving United the lead, the away side battled back against the home crowd and were able to dig deep to get on level terms. For the second week running in the PL they went on the road and ground out a result. Of course Louis Van Gaal‘s side would’ve preferred a win but as the game wore on they looked the more likely to win as Memphis flashed a shot over and Matteo Darmian smashed an effort inches over in stoppage time.

At the back Chris Smalling marshaled a three-man central defensive unit impressively — apart from Vardy’s goal where Ashley Young and Darmian let him get ghost in-behind too easily — but David De Gea was still forced into a great save from Leonardo Ulloa in the 66th minute when the Leicester forward should’ve scored. Once again United flattered to deceive in the final third and that will be a worry for LVG, but they showed grit and determination to gain a point on the road at high-flying Leicester. It is tough to break down United and they say all championships are won with a great defense but the lack of creative flair up front is concerning.


One of the main reasons why that flair wasn’t there, once again, was that Wayne Rooney had another game to forget. United’s captain and talisman started off in a central striking role with Anthony Martial but often in the first half he was dropping deep on the left to pick up the ball and although he sprayed a few nice passes out wide there was no swagger, verve or conviction in his actions. This is a player who captains his country, has been in the PL for over a decade and will break many records by the time his career comes to an end. Right now though, it’s hard to see how Rooney keeps being selected for club and country.

Rooney, 30, is in a slump. He’s scored just twice in 12 Premier League outings this season and when he was substituted in the 68th minute on Saturday, it backed up the recent quotes from LVG stating that his skipper is not a guaranteed starter. It’s not just Rooney that is lacking flair but United in general look lackluster when they have possession and make it too easy for opponents to get back into their shape and defend with 10-men behind the ball.

Playing Rooney as a striker or in the hole hasn’t worked for LVG this season. Is it time he stopped playing him altogether?

Premier League roundup: Man City, Leicester level on points; Magpies into drop zone

during the Barclays Premier League match between Leicester City and Manchester United at The King Power Stadium on November 28, 2015 in Leicester, England.
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A lot of the big guns are playing on Sunday, but that didn’t stop Saturday’s Premier League action from bringing us a mix of history and unlikelihood.

[ WATCH: USMNT’s Johnson scores brace in Bundesliga play ]

Leicester’s star striker broke a Premier League record, and the Foxes are still tied for the most points in the league, behind on Man City on goal differential. Manchester United failed in its quest to reclaim the PL lead, while Newcastle United fell into the drop zone.

That and more, below…

Leicester City 1-1 Manchester UnitedRECAP

Jamie Vardy stands alone as the model of Premier League goal-scoring consistency (at least in one run). The Leicester City man scored early to give him goals in 11-straight games, breaking the record he shared with Ruud van Nistelrooy. Bastian Schweinsteiger found the equalizer for United before the second half drifted into Snooze City. Leicester remains level on points with Man City, while United is a point behind the leaders.

Crystal Palace 5-1 Newcastle United — RECAP

The Magpies are back in the drop zone after an embarrassing display against old boss Alan Pardew at Selhurst Park. Yannick Bolasie and James McArthur each scored twice for the Eagles, who climbed to sixth with the win. Wilfried Zaha also scored in the win.

Sunderland 2-0 Stoke City — RECAP

Ryan Shawcross had the Potters playing a man down for nearly the entire second half, and Sam Allardyce‘s Black Cats now have picked up two wins versus shorthanded sides after Patrick Van Aanholt and Duncan Watmore scored to pull Sunderland out of the relegation zone.

SWANSEA, WALES - NOVEMBER 21: Bournemouth player Junior Stanislas in action during the Barclays Premier League match between Swansea City and A.F.C. Bournemouth at Liberty Stadium on November 21, 2015 in Swansea, Wales. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images)
(Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images)

Bournemouth 3-3 Everton — RECAP

Junior Stanislas‘ day to remember likely made an indelible imprint on the Dean Court crowd, as Bournemouth came back from 2-0 and 3-2 deficits against high-flying Everton. The Toffees led by two at the break before Andy Smith and Stanislas equalized by the 87th minute. Ross Barkley‘s 95th minute goal caused a delay as Everton fans flooded the pitch, and Stanislas made them pay in the eighth minute of stoppage. Madness. Wonderful madness.

Southampton 1-3 Manchester CityRECAP

St. Mary’s was the scene for Man City’s rise back to the top of the table. Aleksandar Kolarov, Kevin De Bruyne and Fabian Delph scored for the leaders, while Shane Long netted Saints’ only goal. Southampton drops to ninth, behind Everton and Palace.

Aston Villa 2-3 WatfordRECAP

The Hornets survived a brief scare from the Villans to pick up three points on the road and rise to 11th on the table. Odion Ighalo scored early before Micah Richards even things up just before halftime. An Alan Hutton own goal restored Watford’s advantage, and Troy Deeney gave them breathing room in the 85th minute. Jordan Ayew pulled Villa to within one in the 89th minute, but it was not to be for Remi Garde’s crew. Villa sits last with a mere five points through 14 games.

Leicester City 1-1 Manchester United: Vardy makes history

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  • Vardy breaks Van Nistelrooy’s record
  • Schweinsteiger finds equalizer
  • De Gea, Schmeichel stand tall in second half

The top-end tilt between Leicester City and Manchester United lived up to its billing for 45 minutes before petering out in a 1-1 draw at King Power Stadium.

That won’t change the enduring memory of the match for the Leicester City faithful, as Jamie Vardy made Premier League history by scoring in his 11th-consecutive game to break United legend Ruud van Nistelrooy’s record.

Leicester is level on points with first-place Manchester City, but behind on goal differential. United is a point off the pace, in third.

[ WATCH: Vardy’s record-setting goal ]

Vardy’s took a tidy touch before belting a low shot past David De Gea‘s right leg, sending the King Power Stadium crowd into a state of euphoria with a 1-0 lead against the PL powers.

Schweinsteiger leveled things before halftime, powering in a corner from Daley Blind.

[ MORE: Twitter reacts to Vardy ]

[ MORE: Click here for full lineups, stats, box score ]  

United should’ve gone up off an Ashley Young free kick in the 49th minute. Schweinsteiger forced Kasper Schmeichel into a save, and Wayne Rooney headed a begging rebound wide of the goal.

Leicester had its chance to go up denied by a fine point-blank save by De Gea, as Leonardo Ulloa was denied by the Spaniard.

The case against McClaren: Should Newcastle United make a change?

LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 28: Steve McClaren manager of Newcastle United scratches his head  during the Barclays Premier League match between Crystal Palace and Newcastle United at Selhurst Park on November 28, 2015 in London, England.  (Photo by Clive Rose/Getty Images)
Photo by Clive Rose/Getty Images
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Newcastle United’s supporters have earned the descriptor “always-proud” over the years, but it’s front office has dipped into “once-proud” category with a series of embarrassing seasons.

And that’s what makes it so tricky to decide whether new boss Steve McClaren deserves the sack after just 14 games in charge of the Northeast side.

[ MATCH RECAP: Crystal Palace 5-1 Newcastle United ]

Despite embattled owner Mike Ashley opening his purse strings this summer — adding Georginio Wijnaldum, Aleksandar Mitrovic and Chancel Mbemba — McClaren has posted a 2W-4D-8L start to life in the Premier League. The wins have come against new boys Norwich City and Bournemouth, and McClaren has seen his team dispatched from the League Cup by a Championship side.

LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 28: Steve McClaren manager of Newcastle United leaves the pitch after his team's 1-5 defeat in the Barclays Premier League match between Crystal Palace and Newcastle United at Selhurst Park on November 28, 2015 in London, England. (Photo by Clive Rose/Getty Images)
(Photo by Clive Rose/Getty Images)

The 54-year-old earned a shot back at the top largely on the merits of his apprenticeship under Sir Alex Ferguson at Manchester United and an Eredivisie crown with Twente in 2009.

After poor, short spells at Wolfsburg and Nottingham Forest, McClaren helped his star rise with Derby County from 2013-15. But he never was able to push the club over the top, fading down the stretch last season.

The Premier League is a win-now entity, and Newcastle is well behind the pace of its top-flight brethren. It’s defending is miserable, and the club has no answers for teams that attack with vigor (See the five goals allowed to Sergio Aguero, last week’s 3-0 loss to Leicester City and today’s embarrassment against former boss Alan Pardew).

[ PARDEW: I don’t want to talk poorly about Newcastle ]

Even former NUFC outcast Luuk De Jong, who failed on Tyneside but is revitalized in Holland, is throwing shade at his brother Siem’s side.

Back in the relegation zone, Newcastle has to enter crisis mode after this aimless run through a span of fixtures that demanding points. Yes, they dominated at Sunderland and lost on an unearned red card, but the Magpies also beat Bournemouth despite getting thoroughly out-classed.

With Liverpool, Tottenham and Everton in three of the Magpies’ next four matches — and raise your hand if you think McClaren will out-manage Mauricio Pochettino, Jurgen Klopp or Roberto Martinez — Newcastle needs to plan for two relegation scraps against Aston Villa and West Brom.

Now could be time to put a caretaker manager into the fray, and find someone who’s helmed a proper relegation fight in the Premier League. Because when even Sam Allardyce is finding points from a substandard group of players at Sunderland, your rival, it’s hard to imagine this can look much worse.

But going back to years of selling their best players — Yohan Cabaye, Andy Carroll, Demba Ba — and letting second-rate (and worse) managers languish in charge, can it really be put on McClaren? That’s the question Ashley has to ask.

Given their schedule, Newcastle has little chance to be out of the relegation battle come New Year’s Day. So who do the Magpies want leading them out come 2016?