Tottenham Hotspur's goalkeeper Lloris is attended to by medical staff after being involved in a collision with Everton's Lukaku during their English Premier League soccer match at Goodison Park in Liverpool

Spurs leaving Lloris in at Goodison proves English soccer miles behind on head injuries (video)

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Hugo Lloris never should have been allowed to continue at Goodison Park.  End of story.

With the Spurs goalkeeper appearing to have been momentarily knocked out by Romelu Lukaku’s knee, the woozy and foggy player fought ferociously to stay on the pitch.

Lloris won protests by the medical staff, his captain Michael Dawson, and manager Andre Villas-Boas, staying on in favor of the substitute Brad Friedel.

In allowing his player to run back onto the field, AVB failed his players and proved that when it comes to head injuries, the Barclays Premier League lacks greatly in both the knowledge of head injuries and how to properly and safely deal with them.

It’s ironic that Lloris was injured by Lukaku.  Clearly unintentional, the imposing Belgian forward had dealt with the same situation just over a month prior, admitting he doesn’t even remember scoring a goal thanks to a blow to the head – which he was allowed to not only continue after, but played a full 90 two days later.

(MORE: Romelu Lukaku situation shows need for Premier League concussion policy)

With one instance, the argument can be made that a need for a policy change is in order (as you can read from Liviu Bird in the link above).

But a flurry of instances this season? Policy is no longer the fix.  A need for education is in order. Education on not just the consequences of serious head injuries both immediate and long-term, but education for medical staff and coaches on how to simply tell a player “no, you cannot go back in.” Former US international and current ESPN fixture Taylor Twellman agrees:

Guess what? AVB after the match said Hugo Lloris can’t remember getting knocked out. He then proceeded to laud his player for his assertiveness in the situation. What a surprise.

It was clear that nobody but Hugo Lloris wanted Hugo Lloris on the pitch after watching what happened. And yet Hugo Lloris ended up back on the pitch.  That is a problem.

This isn’t Spurs first head-injury mishap this season, either.  Just last week, AVB admitted winger Andros Townsend was unconscious and needed oxygen when medical staff arrived to treat him after falling over a video advertising board.  He returned to play in the match.

Stoke City defender Robert Huth was knocked out in September against Manchester City. He played the full 90.

Many in the United States have argued that the National Football League as well as the NCAA has taken things too far regarding head injuries, changing the game itself in an attempt to protect players.  While that may be true, there is no doubt that if the type of injury Lloris sustained had happened in the NFL, and the player had been allowed to come back on, a full investigation would be launched, fines would be issued, and staff members may even lose their jobs. Obviously a much more violent sport, a head injury is a head injury, and should be dealt with the same no matter the sport.

source: Reuters
Romelu Lukaku, having clattered Lloris and maybe knocked him out, immediately called for trainers.

Major League Soccer also has much stricter rules regarding head injuries.  As Liviu points out, MLS requires every single player to undergo baseline testing before the season starts. Following an incident such as the one at Goodison today, the player would immediately be substituted and must prove symptom free – and even then must be cleared by a neuropsychologist – before resuming any type of activity.

Research and evidence have proven time and time again in recent history that head injuries in sports have not just serious but long-lasting effects on the lives of players both during and after their careers.

Adrenaline, recklessness, passion, and youth often drive these players to desire to play through such injuries, and it is the job of the staff to prevent them from doing so.

As Liviu cited in his story about Lukaku, there is also a complete lack of a structured system for teams and players to follow should they sustain a head injury.

The official policy, as cited in the 2013-2014 Premier League official handbook, states, “Any Player, whether engaged in a League Match, any other match or in training, who having sustained a head injury leaves the field of play, shall not be allowed to resume playing or training (as the case may be) until he has been examined by a medical practitioner and declared fit to do so.”

What kind of a “guideline” is that? It’s a disaster that the Premier League has such a lackluster structure in place – no structure whatsoever – to deal with serious and dangerous injuries such as this.

Hopefully this incident will, unlike Lukaku’s, drive the Premier League to institute some type of structure to force teams to act on behalf of player safety.  If they don’t, nobody will, and it is the players who will suffer – mightily.

Here is video of the incident:

U.S. U-20 midfield star leaves FC Dallas for a role with Schalke

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Another Yank youngster has landed in Germany.

Weston McKinnie, 18, has starred for the United States U-20 team as well as FC Dallas’ Academy, and has been in demand.

[ MORE: Americans Abroad news ]

The club is Schalke, a Bundesliga outfit which has had an exceptional offseason. McKinnie joins the U-19 side, and is billed by Schalke as a midfielder who “can be deployed as part of a two-man central midfield or in the number 10 role.”

From Schalkeo4.de/en:

“He’s a player who convinced us with his robustness and game awareness,” said academy director Oliver Ruhnert. “In the US he is one of the best footballers for his age. He is also a youth national team player and has also captained his team. He brings a lot of qualities with him, especially to the mental side of his game. We are therefore convinced that Weston is capable of becoming a professional footballer. The transfer therefore makes a lot of sense.”

McKinnie, if you haven’t read his name before, is absolutely one to remember. The Schalke man joins a club with a good track record for Americans. Chad Deering, Thomas Dooley, and David Wagner have also represented the United States for the Miners.

WATCH and LISTEN: Our Deadline Day show, and the 2 Robbies talk transfers

Robbie Earle & Robbie Mustoe, The 2 Robbies
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Deadline Day was kinda nuts, am I right?

There’s a lot to digest, and we’ve covered a lot of it in this space.

But in case you need more — and who doesn’t want a bit more Premier League? — we’ve got a stream of Wednesday’s TV show covering the deadline, and the 2 Robbies talking transfers.

LISTEN: The 2 Robbies Transfer Deadline Day podcast

REWATCH: Wednesday’s Deadline Day show

Now onto the business of the Premier League’s nascent season. Who was boosted by today’s moves? Who took a hit?

Report: USWNT legend Heather O’Reilly set to retire from soccer

BIRMINGHAM, AL - SEPTEMBER 20:  Heather O'Reilly #9 of the United States of America reacts after scoring a goal against Haiti during the US Women's 2015 World Cup victory tour match at Legion Field on September 20, 2015 in Birmingham, Alabama.  (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
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She has the seventh-most caps and the sixth-most assists in United States women’s national team history, and she’s also calling it a day.

Excelle Sports is reporting that Heather O’Reilly is retiring at the age of 31. The FC Kansas City player will likely play her final match in September, as the 2015 champs have all-but been eliminated from the playoffs.

[ MORE: Five big Deadline Day signings ]

O’Reilly had 230 caps, 46 goals, and 54 assists for the USWNT team. She’s one of only a few players to have more than 45 goals and 50 assists (Julie Foudy, Tiffeny Milbrett, Shannon MacMillan, Abby Wambach, Mia Hamm, Kristine Lilly).

One of many successful products of Anson Dorrance’s UNC program, “HAO” spent her club career with New Jersey Wildcats, Sky Blue FC, and Boston Breakers before joining FCKC.

O’Reilly was left off the Olympic roster this summer, named as an alternate. She could’ve been useful — of course hindsight is 20/20 — and it’ll be odd watching more USWNT matches without HAO.

International roundup: Schweinsteiger, Keane say goodbye; Denmark bags five

Germany's national team throws their captain Bastian Schweinsteiger into the air after he played his last match for the national team in Moenchengladbach, Germany, Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016. Germany won the friendly soccer match against Finland with 2-0. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)
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Two mainstays of the international game are done with that part of their career following shutout wins on Wednesday, just two of several friendlies early in this international break.

[ MORE: Five big Deadline Day signings ]

Germany 2-0 Finland

Max Meyer picked up from his remarkable Olympics by firing home, and Mesut Ozil also scored for the Germans in a match that was not about the winner. Bastian Schweinsteiger called it a day on his international career in the win, his 121st cap. The Manchester United man finishes his career with 24 goals, a World Cup title and a EURO runner-up finish. Not too shabby.

Ireland 4-0 Oman

ROI all-time leading scorer Robbie Keane fittingly ended his tenure as an international player with yet another goal, bringing his career tally to 68 goals in 146 caps. Stoke City’s Jon Walters scored twice for the Boys in Green, and Robbie Brady (Norwich) also netted in the win.

Denmark 5-0 Liechtenstein

It took the hosts a half-hour to break down the visitors, but a pair from Feyenoord striker Nicolai Jorgensen opened the floodgates and Andreas Cornelius, Viktor Fischer and Jens Stryger Larsen finished the scoring in a blowout at the CASA Arena in Horsens. It was Larsen’s first cap.

Elsewhere
Turkey 0-0 Russia
Albania 0-0 Morocco
Estonia 1-1 Malta
Norway 0-1 Belarus
Lebanon 1-1 Jordan