Eddie Johnson interview

What we learned in United States draw with Scotland

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  • Two young guns helped themselves

Two 62nd-minute injections breathed significant life into the U.S. attack – Aron Johannsson and Brek Shea. And that bodes well for both.

For Johannsson, this was the latest in a string of impressive and intriguing nights for the late arrival (having just joined the U.S. program in September). The Icelandic American is skilled, aggressive and seems to have a nose for the goal. If he hasn’t already done enough to earn a spot on the U.S. roster for next year, he’s not that far.

Shea continues to be a fascinating case. He’s probably only in camp due to the U.S. lack of options out wide (since he isn’t playing at Stoke – and Klinsmann prefers not to use those who cannot get into their club lineups), and yet he continues to make a difference coming off the U.S. bench. His direct-line approach with the ball – get ball, run at goal … get ball, run at goal – provides a useful change of pace. He almost always manages to drum up some trouble for opposition defenses. He did again Friday at Hampden Park.

  • Friendlies are friendlies

We heard a narrative develop that perhaps this “friendly” would be less so … friendly, that is. But we should all know by now, so long as they don’t involve traditional rivals (think Brazil-Argentina, U.S.-Mexico … along those lines) then friendlies are friendlies are friendlies.

Yes, the United States took Scotland out behind the woodshed 18 months ago, but that was about Scotland looking forward to vacation. That was on the Scots, and any talk that they were looking to exact revenge was probably just hopeful hype.

These were two teams with agendas, sure – but proving something based on that match 18 months ago just didn’t seem to be one of them. Scotland is rebuilding, the United States is polishing ahead of a World Cup. But claiming some statement win was never a mighty focus. So what did we get?

A snoozer, a typical friendly that came alive just a bit at the end. But only just a little.

  • Michael Bradley, back in the fold

Broken record alert: This team is going nowhere without its midfield general, and what a welcome site his return was for the United States on Friday.

Bradley is easily the best man in possession in a U.S. shirt, and he’s so good at keeping the midfield organized on either side of the ball. Further, his playmaking from deep spots is sorely missed when he’s not around – as is his ability to cover defensively for the occasionally impulsive Jermaine Jones, who tends to vacate his post a little too often.

Here is the best indicator of how valuable Bradley is to the U.S. effort: The United States’ ability to move forward with some calm and structure suffered after about 70 minutes. Why? Bradley, coming off the bench now for Roma, was understandably tiring.

And without Bradley able to work as hard to be the ever-ready outlet, the United States just couldn’t put a foot on the ball as effectively in the midfield.

  • Eddie Johnson is not a wide player

Once again, we saw Klinsmann “reaching” for something due to the lack of options on the flanks.

Eddie Johnson, stationed along the left in that hybrid 4-3-3, can handle the job against lesser nations. But when the competition improves, we see time and again that he’s just not comfortable out wide.

Johnson dutifully attended to his defensive chores, assisting DaMarcus Beasely on his side, so that part wasn’t a big issue.  But on the attack Johnson is at his best – perhaps his only useful role – when he is near opposition goal, making runs and using those big hops. Further out, he loses the ball or slows the attack with negative passing. That’s not really his fault; again, he’s not a wide player. We should know that by now.

The United States had almost no attack up the left before halftime. Johnson paid more attention to creating some width after the break, but the U.S. still never truly bothered Scotland on that side until Brek Shea’s introduction.

Emre Can back in the Liverpool side ahead of Europa clash vs. Villarreal

BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND - FEBRUARY 14:  Emre Can of Liverpool battles for the ball with Idrissa Gana of Aston Villa during the Barclays Premier League match between Aston Villa and Liverpool at Villa Park on February 14, 2016 in Birmingham, England.  (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images)
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Emre Can has recovered from an ankle injury and will be in Liverpool’s squad for their Europa League semifinal against Villarreal on Thursday night.

The German international has not played since April 14 when he was forced off in the Reds’ wild 4-3 win over Borussia Dortmund.

[ MORE: Liverpool prepping for Villarreal ]

Giving his team update on Wednesday, manager Jurgen Klopp said Can is back in the team, although captain Jordan Henderson is still out. The Reds enter the second leg trailing 1-0 on aggregate.

Another positive note out of Melwood was the return of Danny Ings to first-team training. The 23-year-old striker signed with Liverpool last summer, but managed just eight appearances before having his season end to a torn ACL in October. Ings is still far away from his full return, but it was a good sight to see him back on the pitch and making progress in his recovery.

Disappointed Pellegrini rues lack of offense in Man City’s loss to Real

MADRID, SPAIN - MAY 04:  Sergio Aguero of Manchester City reacts during the UEFA Champions League semi final, second leg match between Real Madrid and Manchester City FC at Estadio Santiago Bernabeu on May 4, 2016 in Madrid, Spain.  (Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images )
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Manchester City put in an uninspired performance against Real Madrid on Wednesday, losing the match 1-0 and falling out of the UEFA Champions League.

[ RECAP: Real Madrid 1-0 Man City ]

The match was decided by just one goal, but the scoreline was flattering to City as they failed to create any kind of real chances at the Bernabeu. Over the two legs, City managed just two shots on target.

While City were wildly disappointing in the second leg, manager Manuel Pellegrini did not think the match was that one-sided, saying both teams struggled on the attack.

I am disappointed because I think that was a very close game with two teams who did not create many chances. The two teams were working with no-one making a difference.

It is not the best thing changing a defender very early but I don’t think we had any problems in defence, we had problems creating, same as Real Madrid. They did not create many chances.

Real Madrid was not in top form, but they still could have scored three or four goals on Wednesday. Joe Hart had to come up with some big saves to keep things close, as the England goalkeeper was by far City’s most valuable player throughout the tie.

[ MORE: Liverpool preparing for Europa League match vs. Villarreal ]

The absence of David Silva through injury certainly hurt City’s attack, but there was very little service moving forward from the likes of Kevin De Bruyne and Yaya Toure. The poor play in the midfield left Sergio Aguero stranded alone up top, nearly invisible in the second leg.

Without service, Aguero was forced to track back to try and find the ball himself, leaving City no options to hit on the counter. For a tie between two of the most expensive teams in the world, neither side was truly impressive, but City surely disappointing.

Real Madrid 1-0 (1-0, agg.) Manchester City: Lackluster Citizens bow out of UCL

MADRID, SPAIN - MAY 04:  Gael Clichy of Manchester City and Gareth Bale of Real Madrid challenge for posession during the UEFA Champions League semi final, second leg match between Real Madrid and Manchester City FC at Estadio Santiago Bernabeu on May 4, 2016 in Madrid, Spain.  (Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images )
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  • Kompany lasts just nine minutes
  • Fernando scores own goal
  • Real headed to 14th UCL final

Ninety minutes came and went but Manchester City never showed up, losing to Real Madrid 1-0 and bowing out of the UEFA Champions League in the semifinals.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s UCL coverage ]

Fernando’s own goal in the first half was enough to send Real to a record 14th Champions League final, while City must now shift their focus back to the Premier League.

The Champions League final on May 28 will be a rematch of the 2014 final, a Madrid derby between Real and Atletico.

[ MORE: Full lineups, stats, box score ]

The match got off to a brutal start for Manchester City as Vincent Kompany lasted just nine minutes before going down with a thigh injury. The Belgian center-back has been plagued by muscle injuries all season and Manuel Pellegrini was forced to make an early substitution, bringing in Eliaquim Mangala to replace his captain.

Real Madrid would find the tie’s first goal in the 20th minute, although it would come off the foot of City’s Fernando. Gareth Bale streaked in from the right wing and tried to play a cross into the box, but his attempt deflected off of a sliding Fernando and sailed into the top corner at the far post. Originally given to Bale, it was later ruled an own goal.

Real thought they had a second when Pepe put the ball in the back of the net off a scramble in the box, but the defender was correctly ruled offside as City remained just a goal behind.

It took nearly the entire first half, but City finally created a chance in the 44th minute. Fernandinho found himself upfield and took a pass from Kevin De Bruyne towards the box. The Brazilian cut onto his right foot and fired a shot on goal, but it hit the outside of the post and deflected wide.

[ RELATED: Has Pep Guardiola’s tenure at Bayern Munich been a failure? ]

After the break it was more Madrid pressure, with Joe Hart making a massive stop on Luka Modric just minutes into the second half to keep City alive. Gareth Bale also saw a header rattle off the crossbar as Real continued to control the match.

Just one goal would put City through to the final, but Pellegrini’s side never threatened Keylor Navas, registering just one shot on target. In City’s biggest match in recent history, they were simply not good enough as they must now focus on a top-four finish in England.

Vincent Kompany forced off just nine minutes into Man City’s UCL semi

MADRID, ENGLAND - MAY 04: Pepe of Real Madrid checks on the injured Vincent Kompany of Manchester City  during the UEFA Champions League semi final, second leg match between Real Madrid and Manchester City FC at Estadio Santiago Bernabeu on May 4, 2016 in Madrid, Spain.  (Photo by Michael Regan/Getty Images)
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Vincent Kompany managed just nine minutes in Manchester City’s Champions League semifinal against Real Madrid before going down with a thigh injury.

The City captain pulled up around midfield and immediately went down, replaced by Eliaquim Mangala.

[ FOLLOW LIVE: Real Madrid vs. Man City ]

Earlier this season in the Champions League, Kompany lasted just six minutes before leaving the pitch with a calf injury against Dynamo Kiev.

At 30-years-old, injuries have been Kompany’s biggest enemy this season, with the Belgian center-back managing just 13 starts in the Premier League.