UEFA Women’s Champions League: Pros, cons of saying goodbye to Lyon (Part 2 of 2)

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It’s the stuff Malcolm Gladwell writes books about: tournament favorite Lyon’s early exit from UEFA Women’s Champions League. Or rather, Gladwell would write a book why we perceived OL to be the Goliath. Then he’d go on The Daily Show and explain why out-of-control bias overlooked the fact Turbine Potsdam should have been favorites all long. Because if there’s one thing John Stewart’s always wanted on the show, it’s a hard-hitting segment on the future of Champions League.

Five years of soccer tells us otherwise. Lyon’s dominance isn’t a psychological phenomenon. They were the real deal. Four straight finals with demolition runs to the last two left little doubt. Lyon (pictured, above, ahead of last year’s final) were the world’s best, making this week’s Round of 16 ouster all the more confusing. While it wasn’t unfathomable that a team like Turbine could oust Lyon, a quarterfinal without the acknowledged best team in the world feels incomplete, like an unsolved crime. We need method, we need motive, but we also need to know how to move forward. We need closure.

So let’s break out the whiteboard and deploy the most reliable tool in the anal retentive nerd arsenal: The pro-con list. Let’s go through the good, sift through the bad, and let’s do so in writing. Because anything this important needs 1,800 superfluous words.

Ultimately, let’s try to figure out if a Women’s Champions League without Olympique Lyonnais is a good thing, or a bad thing:

PROS

Teams are either catching up or figuring it out – Lyon didn’t just win back-to-back titles. In 2011-12, they rolled, outscoring their opponents 37-5 in route to their second straight Champions League. Before losing last year’s final 1-0, they had outscored their opposition 40-2, leaving people who called their loss in London with plenty of evidence in support. What are you more inclined to believe: 77-7 over 17 games, or 1-0 in a final?

The way Turbine replicated Wolfsburg’s achievement makes it hard to say the Lyon era’s done. At least, it’s hard to be conclusive about it. After all, it took a hand ball and the away goals rules to leave us in this state.

There is, however, an aura of vulnerability that didn’t exist seven months ago. As Turbine showed, Lyon can be outworked, pushed around a little, and yes, beaten. Kryptonite’s been found.

For some, the competition becomes more legitimate – For years, the complaint about Lyon’s league was that there was no competition, and with Paris Saint-Germain still building their project, it remains a one-team race (even if spots two through four have become so much more interesting). England faced similar complaints about Arsenal’s dominance until Liverpool swiped their title this year.

source: Getty Images
Lyon’s French midfielder Louisa Necib (R) vies with Wolfsburg’s German midfielder Anna Blasse (L) during last year’s UEFA Women’s Champions League final. (Photo: Getty Images.)

Erroneously, people started assuming the same about Champions League. Why watch if you know Lyon’s going to win? Perhaps for the competition’s other 31 teams, though people looking for excuses not to watch will always find something. For them, Lyon’s loss won’t be convincing.

For others, a new, more competitive Champions League will be seen as a more legitimate competition. Whether that’s the right conclusion is almost irrelevant. At least some fans be more likely to follow, which leads us to …

It may be the only way to grow – Whatever it takes to get more people interested in Champions League, right? Those that came for Lyon’s dominance – the majesty of watching the best club team ever (who played some damn good soccer) – aren’t leaving now. But those that were over Lyon and stayed away? They may be more likely to tune in. That Swedish or English soccer fan that didn’t want to look beyond their league before might tune-in mid-week to see if Arsenal, Birmingham City, or Tyresö will claim the crown.

This competition’s still taking baby steps, no matter how quickly some teams went to speed up the clock. Perhaps this phase of the competition’s growth could use the variety. Then, when a new group of people come on board, it might be time for another Lyon to capture other imaginations.

People who hate big spenders: “Throw your pennies in the air/If you’re a true hater”In the men’s world, Lyon’s a huge club. That they’re one of the few from that money-laden realm to strive for excellence on the women’s side put them at a huge advantage. OL’s roster is full of high-priced talents thanks to their cherry picking the rest of France’s talent and their increased forays into the global market (Lotta Schelin, Lara Dickemann, Saki Kumagai, Megan Rapinoe among their foreign stars).

That they went out at the boots of a German team, albeit one that has players from nine different countries, will have symbolic value. While the Frauen Bundesliga brand doesn’t carry the quite same financial connotations as its male counterpart, some will still see the German club as doing it things the “right” way while Lyon’s broken out the check book.

CONS

Competition loses a focal point – Diehards like more diversity in their story lines, but favorites are a great way to draw in casuals. It was that way with the Lakers and Celtics in the 1908s. It was that way with the Yankees (at various points in baseball’s history), and with a competition that’s still well short of its stride, it was that way with Lyonnais. It’s always difficult to replace a headline act.

Another team could prove their equal, but that’s probably not going to happen. It took more than one result for periodic viewers to remember Lyon. We’ll need a few more headlines from one club before was see a line of succession.

Odds are the days of hegemony are probably over. People may have to come for the soccer, not the dominance.

Lyon’s gone all France-y, really shouldn’t be losing these games – Since 2011, the French national team has been the most disappointing side in international soccer, their combination of skill, compelling talents, and attractive play unable to generate a true threat at the last three major tournaments. From dark horses at World Cup 2011 to favorites at Euro 2013, Les Bleues have been repeat offenders in the disappointment department, their results falling short of their potential.

All during that run, France’s contributors have been predominantly Lyon players, yet those stars had managed to contain their on-field disappointments to the international realm. Not so anymore. Not only have Lyon lost the last two Champions Leagues from  a favorite’s position, they’ve used their national team’s trademarked “how did they let that happen?!?” approach. Leaving few explanations for their failure, Lyon’s gone all France-y on us.

source: Getty Images
Lotta Schelin, pictured here playing for Sweden, has 33 goals in 30 games in 2013 for club and country. Despite leading Euro 2013 scoring, Schelin’s FIFA World Player of the Year candidacy will likely be hurt by Lyon’s early Champions League exit. (Photo: Getty Images.)

Lotta Schelin will be under-appreciated – Schelin is the best player in the world. Others’ mileage may vary (that’s what comment sections are for), but for me, the debate isn’t even that compelling right now. While the distance between her and the next level isn’t big, a gap exists. There’s a precision Schelin brings to the striker position that’s unparalleled in the world game. Nobody can match it: not Abby Wambach; not Christine Sinclair; not Alex Morgan.

Unfortunately, she’s becoming a victim of her own success, and that victimization is going to cost her FIFA World Player of the Year. Like Lionel Messi in years’ past, or Zlatan Ibrahimovic, or Cristiano Ronaldo, people are starting to complain that she doesn’t score in big games, and while that’s true (she didn’t score against Potsdam, in Sweden’s Euro 2013 eliminator, or in any of the Champions League finals), the reason is obvious. You give talented, well-organized teams one thing to do — like stop one player — they’ll usually find a way. As we saw in the buildup to this week’s Portugal-Sweden playoff, we usually greatly exaggerate the potential effect stars can have on a match.

Go ahead and bring up examples of Pele, Maradona, and the new Messi, but they’re exceptions to the rule. Ibrahimovic, Ronaldo, or almost any other player in the history of the world’s game can be stopped. As can Messi. It’s up to their teammates to make the opposition pay.

I use mens’ players with the hopes of making the point as accessible as possible. No matter how many times world soccer’s provided evidence to undermine the idea that everybody can be Maradona, people are still unconvinced. It’s not enough to be a superstar. Every player needs to be a Super, Mega Star or they’re torn down.

Maybe Lotta Schelin isn’t a Super, Mega Star, but she’s still the best player in the world. If Abby Wambach or Nadine Angerer win FIFA Player of the Year simply because Schelin didn’t go full Michelle Akers on the world, that’s just wrong. But it would also be par for the course for that award.

The draw methodology is pretty seriously messed up – On this, we can all agree. There’s no way Lyon should be facing Turbine Potsdam this early in the competition. There’s no way Paris Saint-Germain and Tyresö should have met in the round of 32, either. And Wolfsburg shouldn’t have forced to eliminate Malmö this early. We don’t need Champions League final-caliber matchups in November.

The system needs to be changed. Right now, 16 of the competition’s 32 teams get seeded, drawn out of one bag against teams from the other – a process that changes come the Round of 16. In the interest of having the best matchups come during the later, more marketable times of the tournament, the “seeded” teams need to be protected deeper into the tournament.

A group stage is out of the question. There’s not enough money in this competition to support that right now, leaving two options (which, admittedly, me and three Twitter friends thought up):

  • Tennis/NCAA-style seeding and bracket, where the top X teams get seeds. Instead of a redraw at the end of each round, the bracket remains constant from the beginning. Or,
  • You reseed after each round until a certain point in the tournament; say, the semifinals. At the Round of 32, you have 16 seeds. At the Round of 16, you have eight. You do something to keep Lyon and Turbine from meeting so soon.

There is another problem, though, and that’s the seeding itself. With the landscape of women’s soccer in flux (thanks to the money coming into the game), it’s difficult for any rating system to stabilize. UEFA coefficients are much more effective on the men’s side than the women’s. You still have a situation where a team like Glasgow City is seeded while Tyresö is not.

Until that reaches the type of equilibrium we see on the men’s side, all seedings are going to be flawed.

MLS Snapshot: Houston Dynamo 1-1 FC Dallas (video)

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The game in 100 words (or less): It ended scoreless when the two sides met for the first time this season, and although there were goals in this one, it finished with the same outcome. The Dynamo and Dallas remain equal on points following the draw, with each team boasting 25 at the midway point through the MLS campaign. Goals from Erick “Cubo’ Torres and Maxi Urruti cancelled one another out at BBVA Compass Stadium, but it was the Dallas that had more of the chances in the match. The Dynamo remain one of the top sides in MLS at home, boasting a record of 7-0-2 in their opening nine matches in Houston.

Three two moments that mattered

19′ — Torres makes it 11 on the year! — Give Erick Torres an inch this season… Well, you know the rest of the saying…

59′ — Urruti makes Dynamo pay for missed chance on other end — The Dynamo were so close to making it 2-0 just a minute sooner, but Maxi Urruti had other plans for the visitors.

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Man of the match: Maxi Urruti

Goalscorers: Erick Torres (19′), Maxi Urruti (59′)

MLS Snapshot: Toronto FC 2-0 New England Revolution (video)

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The game in 100 words (or less): Toronto FC was without some of its regulars on Friday night, but that didn’t matter much as Greg Vanney’s side avenged their loss to the Revolution from two weeks ago. Coming off of just two days’ rest, TFC continued its push towards an Eastern Conference title at BMO Field behind Drew Moor’s first goal of the season. Sebastian Giovinco was held in check most of the evening, but the Italian scorer did what he does best in the final minute of stoppage time to seal it for the home side with his seventh goal of the year. The Revs pushed and pushed during the second half for an equalizer but TFC’s resilience defensively proved superior as they kept the visitors off the scoreboard for their eighth shutout of 2017.

Three moments that mattered

11′ — Moor taps in for early Toronto advantage — Even on two days’ rest Toronto looks like this…

57′ — Cheeky Nguyen keeps Revs in match — Lee Nguyen is typically known for his creativity in the offensive half but it was this clever play defensively that kept the Revolution down just one goal.

83′ — Kamara comes so close! — It’s just not meant to be on the night for the Revs.

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Man of the match: Alex Bono

Goalscorers: Drew Moor (11′), Sebastian Giovinco (90+6′)

Video: Orlando City product scores crazy bicycle kick

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Goals like this one below never grow old.

Orlando City academy product Alejandro Pereira scored a brilliant bicycle kick for his Under-17/18 side in their 2-0 win on Thursday night during the U.S. Soccer Development Academy playoffs.

Orlando will continue its path in the Academy Playoffs on Saturday when they face off against Players Development Academy (PDA) U-17/18, before meeting Indiana Fire U-17/18 on Monday.

Brazilian league filled with possible transfer targets

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SAO PAULO (AP) While soccer takes a rest in Europe and the Brazilian league gets going again, many local players have already caught the eyes of foreign clubs.

[ MORE: Confed Cup scenarios before final group stage matches ]

A few of them are already in Brazil coach Tite’s plans for next year’s World Cup in Russia, and signing them now instead of next season could be a real bargain.

Here are some names to know:

LUAN

A 24-year-old striker at title-favorite Gremio, Luan has yet to play abroad and his coach has already said it will be hard to keep him in Brazil until the end of the season. After eight matches, Luan has scored four goals. Gremio executives have said they won’t take less than 24 million euros ($27 million) for him. Luan was part of Brazil’s gold-medal winning team at the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. He began the tournament on the bench, but eventually took a place in the starting lineup alongside Neymar and Gabriel Jesus. Ronaldinho said Luan deserves to be at Barcelona. “Luan would fit in perfectly there, he is very creative,” Ronaldinho said.

GUILHERME ARANA

More than 20 percent of the goals scored by Corinthians this year have come from the left foot of 20-year-old defender Guilherme Arana. An excellent Brazilian-style dribbler, Arana had several assists in the derbies against the team’s three Sao Paulo city rivals. Arana has yet to make his international debut, but he believes his short time with Tite at the club could help him get to Russia next year. Many in Brazilian media have dubbed him “the new Marcelo.”

LUCAS LIMA

A close friend of Neymar, 26-year-old midfielder Lucas Lima has been frequently linked with a transfer to Barcelona. In the first 100 days of 2017 he had 10 assists – the same number he produced all of last season. He is in top physical shape, something that has earned him praise from coaches and a series of callups from Tite to play with Brazil. Lima has rejected a series of offers from Chinese clubs because he wants to play in Europe.

GUSTAVO SCARPA

Fluminense midfielder Gustavo Scarpa is classy and cerebral, traits he tries to mirror from his hero Andres Iniesta. But the 23-year-old Brazilian can also provide some stunning shots from long distance, like the goal he scored from his own half in February in a Brazilian Cup match against Globo. Scarpa likes to play as a left winger, but he can also be used in a central midfield position and as a left back. Tite called on him for a friendly against Colombia in February. In the 2016 Brazilian league, he scored eight goals and had 10 assists. He has just finished recovering from a right foot injury.

DUDU

A fan-favorite at defending champion Palmeiras last season, 25-year-old striker Dudu has yet to score in this year’s competition. Still recovering from injury, Dudu is fast and often runs right at goal. He played at Dynamo Kyiv without much success from 2011-14, and he admits he was not very mature when that transfer happened. In March, he was part of the Brazil team for World Cup qualifying matches against Uruguay and Paraguay, as a replacement of injured Douglas Costa.

RODRIGO CAIO

A 23-year-old Sao Paulo defender who has frequently been called up by Tite, Rodrigo Caio has played more than 200 matches for his club. Caio wants to go to Europe after a first attempt at Valencia fell through — he failed a medical check because of a now-healed knee injury. Also a gold medalist at the 2016 Olympics, the defender can play as a defensive midfielder. Although he looks a lot like Kaka, his style is more like Dunga’s: great tackles, accurate passing and leadership.