Hull City 3-1 Liverpool: David Meyler winner downs Reds at KC Stadium (video)

1 Comment

24-year-old David Meyler’s first Premier League goal is one he’ll remember for a long, long time.

With Hull averaging less than a goal per game, they put two past Simon Mignolet and Liverpool and used a strong, anchored midfield to stymie Luis Suarez and the Reds attack to win 3-1 at the KC Stadium.

Meyler’s winner did the trick, and Tom Huddlestone forced a Martin Skrtel own-goal down the stretch to ice the win, Hull’s first-ever over Liverpool in any competition in 17 tries.

The Reds were lively at times, but it was only for short moments and they snoozed through much of the 90 minutes.

It was a terribly dull first 20 minutes, with Hull City content to out-midfield Liverpool.

Thankfully, the soccer gods took over and said “enough with this.” Jake Livermore found himself with the ball in the Liverpool half, and decided to have a go at goal from range.  It took a deflection off Martin Skrtel, and a lucky break for Hull turned into the game’s first goal.

It woke up Liverpool for a bit, and the Reds immediately responded, with a Jordan Henderson run forcing a yellow-card challenge from Curtis Davies which gave the visitors a dangerous free-kick.

Steven Gerrard stepped up and delivered, bending his kick around the wall and in the net to level the score just seven minutes after falling behind.

Liverpool then went back to sleep, but Hull stayed incisive.  The home midfielders didn’t press hard, happy to keep possession, but the home side didn’t disappoint as they asked a few questions of the visiting defense and used a physical approach to pin down Liverpool’s buildup.

The Reds began the second half much brighter, clearly given some encouragement by Brendan Rodgers at the halftime break.

source: Getty Images
Tom Huddlestone and the strong Hull midfield kept Luis Suarez at bay without Daniel Sturridge.

However, after the initial Liverpool spell, the game grinded to a halt once more until the 65th minute, when Hull began a spell of their own.

Tom Huddlestone anchored the Hull midfield, and he found Robby Brady who dribbled into a dangerous area but couldn’t put anything on the ball.

Finally on 70 minutes the game opened up. Liverpool build a beautiful chance in the 71st minute, only to have Allan McGregor deny Victor Moses in his first real action between the sticks. Luis Suarez did well on a one-two with Moses, and the ball went out to Philippe Coutinho who crossed back to Moses, and the young winger was rejected on close range by a strong McGregor.

It didn’t last long for Liverpool, as then Hull took the reigns and scored back on the other end through David Meyler.

The Irish midfielder popped off an early shot, and a scrum ensued in which Liverpool were unable to clear the ball.  It ended up back at the feet of Meyler, who didn’t miss with his second shot across the face and into the far corner past Simon Mignolet for the lead.

Hull continued to pin down Liverpool impressively, and as time wound down Yannick Sagbo nearly put Hull 3-1 up on a breakaway in the 87th minute, but was saved well by Mignolet.

However, they would get their 3-1 lead moments later as Tom Huddlestone got another Skrtel deflection to wrong-foot Mignolet and seal the win. Huddlestone received the ball from Sagbo at the top of the box and probably should have hit the shot first-touch, but instead he backed it up and fired, and Skrtel’s head put it in the net.

Unfortunately, Huddlestone will not be cutting his hair, as the score is down as an own-goal off Skrtel, with Huddlestone’s attempt going wide.

It’s a shocking yet comprehensive win for this season’s best new side thus far, as Hull City move to an impressive 10th place in the table with the three points.  Liverpool had an opportunity to jump closer to Arsenal at the top, but fail to do so as the Gunners lead remains seven points.

GOALS:

Hull City – Livermore 20′; Meyler 72′
Liverpool – Gerrard 27′; Skrtel (og) 87′

LINEUPS:

Hull City – McGregor; Elmohamady, Figueroa, Davies, A. Bruce; Meyler, Huddlestone, Livermore, Brady (Boyd, 90′), Koren (Rosenoir, 66′); Sagbo (Graham, 90′).

Liverpool – Mignolet; Flanagan, Toure, Skrtel, Johnson; Lucas, Gerrard, Henderson, Moses (Alberto, 74′), Sterling (Coutinho, 66′); Suarez.

Top PL Storylines: Merseyside Derby, relegation special

Getty Images
Leave a comment

The international break is over and the Premier League is back.

[ MORE: What’s left for each PL club? ]

This stretch run begins now, as teams have around eight more matches left in league play with which to move up or down. Who will climb the table, and who will lose spots? The best picks are below:


Merseyside clubs clinging to European places

Liverpool vs. Everton — 7:30 a.m. EDT Saturday online via NBCSports.com

Everton and Liverpool doesn’t need any sideshows to hype up the heated rivalry, but a little added spice won’t hurt anything. Spice is what we have as the two teams clash at Anfield Saturday as both teams are battling for European places.

Liverpool comes into the game in fourth, four points ahead of Manchester United for the final Champions League spot. A return to Europe’s top competition is overdue for Jurgen Klopp and the Reds, having made the tournament just once since 2010. It’s been a dogfight all year at the top of the table (aside from Chelsea, of course), and Liverpool is right in the mix. A misstep here would give Manchester United the chance to climb just one point back, really putting on the pressure. For Everton, they sit in seventh, level with Arsenal on points and just two behind Manchester United. They still have a good shot at Europa League play, and any spot in a European competition is a welcome moment for an Everton team that has appeared just once since 2010.

Both teams have to contend with injuries suffered over the international break. Everton’s Seamus Coleman is out at least for the rest of the season after his nasty leg break, while Liverpool will miss Adam Lallana who aggravated a muscle injury while on duty with England and will likely be out a month.

Will Arsenal or City turn their season around?

Arsenal vs. Manchester City — 11:00 a.m. EDT Sunday online via NBCSports.com

Arsene Wenger continues to find himself under more and more pressure. It seems Pep Guardiola takes one step back for every one step forward. As the two managers meet at the Emirates on Sunday, will either man manage to get a high-profile win to boost its season’s fortunes?

The Gunners are in serious peril. Wenger has never missed the Champions League in his 20 seasons in charge, but that could all change this year as Arsenal sits in 6th on 50 points, six back of fourth position. There is little to no room for error the rest of the way, and even against a strong opponent, the Gunners cannot afford to drop more points. For Pep Guardiola, City still sits in an envious position in third place and five points clear of dropping off the top four, but it’s not been without bumps and bruises. City is without a win in its last three matches, having dumped out of the Champions League and drawn a pair in league play over that time. Both managers are struggling. Will either turn things around?

A relegation special

Swansea City vs. Middlesbrough — 8:30 a.m. EDT Sunday online via NBCSports.com

Middlesbrough is in the relegation zone. Swansea City isn’t out of the weeds yet. Premier League status could be on the line.

As the two teams meet at the Liberty Stadium, Middlesbrough can go a long way towards climbing out of the bottom 3, while Swansea City can build space from it. Boro sits in 19th place, on 22 points, five back of safety. In that final safe spot is Swansea, on 27 points, and depending on the results of this match, things could get hairy for the loser. A draw helps nobody, so expect both sides to go all out.

Spurs with a tough road test

Burnley vs. Tottenham — 10:00 a.m. EDT Saturday online via NBCSports.com

Spurs sit in second, 10 points off the top but in control of the tight Champions League battle. Yet, they face a difficult challenge on Sunday. Burnley has lost just twice all season long at home, the latest coming January 2nd. Their away form has been miserable, but at home, they’re a completely different team.

Enter Tottenham, who has won three Premier League games in a row, but it’s not all rosy for the title contenders. They’re still without Harry Kane, who has returned to light training but still remains sidelined with his ankle injury. Sean Dyche can coach with the best of them in the English top flight, and it remains to be seen if Mauricio Pochettino can break down a strong Clarets defense. Spurs managed a 2-1 home win over Burnley, but a similar performance won’t get it done at the fortress of Turf Moor.

Former DC United keeper sues club plus Espindola, Olsen

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Former DC United goalkeeper Charlie Horton has filed a lawsuit naming D.C. United and Major League Soccer defendants along with Fabian Espindola and manager Ben Olsen.

The lawsuit alleges assault by Espindola which left Horton with career-ending concussion symptoms which he claims still haunt him today. Horton, born in London, was on D.C. United’s roster in 2016, but never saw the field as he failed to crack the pecking order which boasted Bill Hamid, Tally Hall, and Andrew Worra. Eventually, Horton was sent on loan to the Richmond Kickers to gain playing time.

According to the lawsuit, Espindola attacked Horton at the team training facility in late March of 2016 after an argument involving an incident in training weeks earlier. Horton did indeed officially miss seven weeks with a concussion that season, the first of two injuries he suffered that year (a broken hand ended his season).

However, the lawsuit states that Horton was not entered into MLS concussion protocol immediately, instead allowed to practice that day and only entering protocol and missing time when he reported his symptoms the following day. Horton was cleared to play in May, and was then sent on loan to Richmond.

The lawsuit states that the lingering concussion symptoms caused the end of Horton’s career. “Due to the severity of his ongoing post-concussive neurological symptoms, which directly inhibited his ability to perform at a level necessary to continue his professional career, Mr. Horton was forced to officially retire from professional soccer.”

Horton claims that Espindola’s attack was a blindsided attack, an elbow to the temple after Horton had turned to walk away from the altercation.

Manuel Neuer injured, will miss two games

Getty Images
Leave a comment

A long streak will come to an end on Saturday when Bayern Munich hosts Augsburg at Allianz Arena.

Manuel Neuer, who has started 65 straight Bundesliga matches for Bayern, will be forced to the bench after injuring his foot in training on Wednesday. That means a streak of 5,850 straight minutes played will be snapped.

The injury required minor surgery, which was performed by club doctor Markus Walther, and a club release said it “went optimally.”

The injury will see Neuer miss at least the Augsburg match plus the midweek visit to Hoffenheim. That leaves the two big matches up in the air, with Bayern set to travel to Westfalenstadion to take on Borussia Dortmund on April 8th, followed closely by the first leg against Real Madrid in the Champions League quarterfinals the following Tuesday. There was no mention of either game in the club release.

The last time Neuer missed minutes in a Bundesliga game was a home game against Eintract Frankfurt on April 11, 2015. The last time the 31-year-old missed more than three league games in a season was 2008/09 when he played for Schalke and missed the first six games of the year with a broken foot.

With the club 13 points clear at the top of the Bundesliga table, the injury is likely to have little effect on the final league standings, but should Neuer end up out for either the Dortmund game or, more importantly, the match against Real Madrid, it could affect the club’s position in the Champions League.

World Cup expansion will destroy regional qualifying

Getty Images
Leave a comment

On Thursday, FIFA announced a preliminary plan to expand the World Cup to a whopping 48 teams, starting in 2026 if the approval process goes as planned.

Every continental region is gaining slots, with CONCACAF nearly doubling its allotment, Africa adding four teams, and Europe gaining three. 46 teams would make the tournament outright, while another two would come from a six-team playoff.

The early outlook was met with cautious optimism across the soccer community, and there’s no doubt that the World Cup itself would benefit from expansion, with not only a significantly increased revenue stream for the FIFA brass to gawk at, but also viewers will gain from added entertainment, a la March Madness as smaller countries gain access to opportunities to shock larger nations in front of a grander audience.

[ MORE: FIFA announces World Cup expansion details ]

Despite the obvious gains, what gets completely and utterly dismantled is the qualification stage. In exchange for a month of tournament-style wackiness, not only does making the World Cup completely lose any remaining pedigree, but the qualification stage becomes an afterthought for continental powerhouses.

This particularly applies to CONCACAF, where currently the final round of qualification features a six-team round-robin. The way it stands currently, the usual bunch can often overcome minor slips to qualify on a regular basis, but as we’re seeing with the United States, at least things are interesting for the opening few rounds and questions often remain throughout the entire process. Just last cycle, we saw Mexico qualify thanks to the United States’ generosity with a last-second goal against Panama to send their southern neighbors through. Bottom line: it’s not always easy.

Now, with the new system, a massive total of six teams will make the finals, leaving almost no doubt about the fates of those at the top. Mexico and the United States will be shoo-ins, leaving the qualification process a near-afterthought. Sure, countries that don’t always see the final rounds will now have an increased shot, and that’s a great development for the growth of the game worldwide, but it comes at a great price. Now, instead of the ability to lure casual World Cup-only fans with meaningful games between tournaments, national teams will be left with a shell of the old qualification process to slog through.

Looking to Europe, already teams like France, Spain, and Germany are running away with their groups in the current format. Add three more slots to the mix, and even the next tier of countries like England, Poland, and Italy will be given near-automatic spots. Group G currently sees Spain and Italy battling for the automatic berth, with the runner-up left with a chance at disappointment in a one-game playoff. Now, with the new system, the life is sucked from the process, and teams are left with glorified friendlies.

In South America, four (usually five) teams make the tournament. That often leaves a top team sweating it out near the end of the cycle, with Argentina currently tugging at its collar having slipped in recent qualifiers. Add two more automatic slots, and you can kiss the drama goodbye. As it stands, Argentina – despite three losses in its last five matches – would still be four points clear of danger.

tl;dr version: It’s no fun anymore.

Nobody is surprised by FIFA’s pursuit of yet another way to increase revenue; we’ve seen it countless times before. Unfortunately, the price is high, as the 3-1/2 years between would entirely fall apart.