Chelsea, Manchester City’s new means of dealing with Financial Fair Play


Major League Soccer commissioner Don Garber claims his league is losing between $75-$100 million a year, a claim more likely a pre-collective bargaining stance than anything reflecting the league’s true financial health. The claim does, however, highlight the state of MLS’s maturation. With signings like Clint Dempsey’s and Michael Bradley’s, and with investments from clubs and the league helping the teams move beyond their first generation venues, it’s easy to slant the books to make the league seem more impoverished than it actually is. Put those big, long-term commitments on the books now, and leave the league to look thriving once a new collective bargaining agreement is signed.

They’re the same type of machinations that could also help the league’s new partner deal with UEFA’s Financial Fair Play regulations. Manchester City, who this week also acquired Melbourne Heart in Australia, have become one of Europe’s big spenders since Abu Dhabi United took over the team in 2008. They’ve paid a premium to bring the likes of Yaya Toure, Sergio Aguero and Fernandinho (among others) to greater Manchester. In the process, they’ve served as one of the poster boys in UEFA president Michel Platini’s quest to get big clubs’ spending in line with their incomes.

Designated Players and Manchester City’s new Marquee contract havens

That’s where MLS (and the A-League, two leagues with permeable salary caps) come in. With no FFP-esque oversight in CONCACAF or its Asian counterpart, the AFC, those highly speculated Gareth Barry-esque loans become a way to get inefficient contracts off the books, giving City some extra room beneath UEFA’s spending ceilings. If City can send Barry’s salary ($10.37 million) and, say, Javi Garcia’s ($7.26 million) to NYCFC while claiming their child club will cover the wages, the parent team all of a sudden has a significant amount of breathing room on their books. While Abu Dhabi United adds money directly to NYCFC’s coffers, City gets some FFP flexibility they wouldn’t get if their owners were merely writing checks to the club.

Under FFP, UEFA has the power to investigate these shady dealings. The problem is, on the books, this won’t look shady. City will loan the players to NYCFC and have their wages covered by their partner. NYCFC will simply pay for them and either not have to explain that Abu Dhabi United’s simply shifting money from one pile to another or confess that’s what’s happening while asking ‘why shouldn’t we be able to do this?’

Of course, that’s all speculation. NYCFC is still a year away from taking the field. Who knows what their team will look like? Yet, if Manchester City so choose, they can fill their new teams’ three Designated Player spots with City’s less useful contracts. They can do the same at Heart with the A-League’s Marquee Player rule (one per team). With whispers around MLS saying City has already secured promises for more lenient spending rules (perhaps more Designated Players), it’s not difficult to imagine the Australian federation  making similar guarantees to lure a high-profile owner.

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On loan at Everton this season, midfielder Gareth Barry has been linked with a move to NYCFC for 2015 – the new franchise’s debut season in Major League Soccer. (Photo: Getty Images)

In the grand scheme of things, it could be seen as nitpicking at the margins. On the other hand, if City are able to take four contracts that aren’t significantly contributing to their team, move them abroad, and get room within FFP to replace them, those could be the type of margins that make a difference at the highest levels. Given the gap between Arsenal and City at the top of the Premier League, or the gap in quality between Barcelona and City in their UEFA Champions League Round of 16 matchup, every little bit could help.

When UEFA implemented FFP, it’s unlikely they anticipated these kinds of maneuvers. As Platini spoke against the continued spending of his confederation’s biggest clubs, he never spoke about the possibility of “player havens” popping up across the globe. It’s unlikely that’s Manchester City’s sole intent (the growth possibilities alone in MLS and the A-League justify the expenditures), but the havens are still a nice coincidence. How many of Europe’s top teams would pay a one-time $100 million fee to have a permanent FFP work around?

Chelsea: Udinese, on a totally different level

In a completely different way, one City’s Premier League competitors appear to be developing a different work around, one that was evident when they sold Kevin de Bruyne to Wolfsburg. Although Chelsea never significantly used their young Belgian attackers (loaning him out for 1.5 of his two years at Stamford Bridge), they were able to turn a nice profit on the former Genk star. Having become the Wolves’ record signing earlier this month, the near-$15 million Chelsea netted in transfer fees will go toward their FFP bottom line. Though wages and other expenses take a bite into that profit, the Blues still made big money off their de Bruyne flip.

For purchases like Mohamed Salah, Chelsea’s unlikely to experience that kind of profit. And with deals like Fernando Torres’s, Gary Cahill’s, Willian’s and Eden Hazard’s, they’ll surely lose money, just as most teams do when they pay their key players. But among the 26 players Chelsea have on loan — including Vitesse’s Christian Atsu, Middlesbrough’s Kenneth Omeruo, and Valencia’s Oriol Romeu — the Blues will have a few more de Bruynes. For every Thibaut Courtois or Romelu Lukaku that eventually breaks into Jose Mourinho’s first team, there may be two eight-figure flips that pad Chelsea’s FFP margins.

Purchased from FC Porto this summer, Ghanaian international Christian Atsu is one of five Chelsea players at Vitesse in the Dutch Eredivisie.

It’s a model that Serie A club Udinese is built on, even if the Giampaolo Pozzo’s team is operating on a much lower level. With 33 players on loan between the Serie A, Granada (Spain) and Watford (England), the Genoa-based club have set up an infrastructure that allows the Bianconeri to scoop up and house prospects across South America and Europe, hoping to find another Alexi Sanchez. Though the Zebras rarely find a player that allows them to collect over $35 million (as the Chilean did from Barcelona in 2011), smaller sales make the model work, with players waiting to be sold making up the squads of Pozzo’s expanding number of clubs.

Instead of paying $1 or $2 million on true prospects, Chelsea’s able to spend much more on more established talents. And while those players’ values mature — while they’re out on loan across Europe — most of the wage burden is being picked up by other clubs, leaving only the balance and an amortized transfer fee on the Blues’ FFP bottom line. Instead of selling on the Sanchezes of the world, Chelsea keeps the stars they develop, with the rest of their sales addressing their financial end.

That end isn’t profitability. It’s Financial Fair Play – rules implemented to try to bring clubs’ spending in line with income. In the case of Chelsea and Manchester City, however, new approaches are (or will) allow them to play beyond FFP’s pure intent. For Chelsea, that means becoming a broker for emerging talent, helping them to either the Premier League or some nice wages while they await their next permanent home. For City, that means setting up franchises across the world, with the rules of each region potentially helping the Citizens transcend UEFA’s limits.

Slaven Bilic wants West Ham to stop whining about missing Payet

LONDON, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 24: Slaven Bilic manager of West Ham United looks on during the Barclays Premier League match between West Ham United and Chelsea at Boleyn Ground on October 24, 2015 in London, England.  (Photo by Jordan Mansfield/Getty Images)
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Sometimes nominating the signing of the season is difficult to do until we get a glimpse of a team without their new addition. We’re seeing that this year as West Ham, who were in fifth position before summer signing Dimitri Payet went down with an ankle injury that could see him out for three months.

Without Payet, they looked lost in a 4-1 defeat to Spurs at White Hart Lane, and the void left in midfield was all anyone could talk about.

Slaven Bilic hates that.

“Losing Payet is a blow but we have two options: one is continue to talk about it and the other is to get together and play better even without him,” Bilic said prior to Sunday’s home matchup with West Brom. “He’s a player who has made a huge impact. He’s a key player for us and is doing the things that every club needs.”

Before the Spurs match, Bilic was adamant that the team was losing its best player. Now, he’s of the opposite tone.

“In my team I have enough players who can make his absence to feel it less,” Bilic said. “We have enough quality to play without Dimitri. We were hugely disappointed and angry with the way we played [against Tottenham].”

Jamie Vardy setting up academy to help discover non-league talent

during the Barclays Premier League match between Southampton and Leicester City at St Mary's Stadium on October 17, 2015 in Southampton, England.
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In 2012, Jamie Vardy was playing non-league football for Fleetwood Town.

Today, he is the top scorer in the Premier League with Leicester City, and is currently on a record run of scoring in ten straight matches.

[ MORE: Top 5 PL storylines ]

Vardy’s meteoric rise is the stuff of fairytales, and now he is giving back to those who are trying to break through as he did a few years ago.

The 28-year-old striker has set up the V9 Academy, a program aimed at finding non-league talent and helping the players develop into “the next Jamie Vardy.”

I know there are players out there in a similar position to where I was that just need an opportunity,

More and more players are dropping out of the system early. For me, it was at Sheffield Wednesday when I was 16 because they thought I was too small. I remember how that felt and it’s difficult to come back from or even think about the professional game.

I’ve thought for some time that something could be done about it and after several conversations with my agent and my fiancee, Becky, we decided to set up V9 to unearth talent and give those players a shot – hopefully at earning professional contracts but also to learn what it takes to be a professional at the highest level.

In just his second season in the Premier League, Vardy has become one of the most prolific strikers in Europe, earning him Player of the Month honors for October as well as a call-up to the England national team.

Premier League Black Friday bargains: Players that might be up for sale

LONDON, ENGLAND - APRIL 25:  Charlie Austin of QPR reacts during the Barclays Premier League match between Queens Park Rangers and West Ham United at Loftus Road on April 25, 2015 in London, England.  (Photo by Paul Gilham/Getty Images)
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While most people are out looking for good deals on televisions and electronics on Black Friday, ProSoccerTalk is eyeing bargains on midfielders and strikers.

[ MORE: Transfer Rumor roundup ]

With the transfer window just over a month away, we’re taking a look at a few players that could be up for sale come January 1.

Charlie Austin (Queens Park Rangers)

One of the biggest surprises of the summer transfer window was that Charlie Austin stayed at QPR and didn’t move to a Premier League club. The English striker scored 18 goals in the PL last season, and a move away from Loftus Road seemed like a guarantee when QPR was relegated. However, Austin stayed loyal to the club and said he wanted to help them earn promotion back into the top flight.

Things aren’t going as planned though, as QPR sit 15th in the Championship and sacked manager Chris Ramsey earlier this month. Despite the club’s struggles, Austin has scored seven goals in 12 games, showing he is still a top talent. QPR turned down some offers for Austin before the season, but with his contract expiring in June, they may be willing to sell their striker for a discounted price, or risk him leaving on a free transfer in the summer.

Dwight Gayle (Crystal Palace)

Dwight Gayle has fallen out of favor at Palace, as the striker has been limited to mostly a bench role under Alan Pardew. That may work out well for some suitors, as his lack of playing time could bring down his market value a bit. He was close making a move away from Selhurst Park this summer, and it doesn’t look like he’s in line for a new deal. Gayle seems to have lost his way a bit, but is the type of player that would have a chip on his shoulder and be eager to prove he has what it takes to be a starting striker in the Premier League.

[ MORE: Top storylines to look out for in Week 14 of the Premier League ]

Jermain Defoe (Sunderland)

The 33-year-old Sunderland striker can still score goals, seen when he bagged the game-winner for the Black Cats against Crystal Palace last week. While Sunderland supporters would like to keep Defoe to help the club survive relegation, it has been reported the striker and manager Sam Allardyce don’t exactly see eye-to-eye. When asked about a possible January sale of Defoe, Big Sam didn’t help the situation by answering “Whatever happens, happens.” While he may have lost a bit of pace, Defoe is still the 11th-highest goalscorer in Premier League history, and seems to always be good for a goal in crunch-time.

Ravel Morrison (Lazio)

The 22-year-old has reportedly left his Italian club Lazio for “personal reasons” just months after joining the side in July. Morrison is one of those “What could have been?” stories, as he came up through the Manchester United academy pegged to be a star, only to have off-the-field issues put a damper in his career. He has previously played in the Premier League with West Ham, and played first-team football with Birmingham City and QPR in the Championship. With Morrison expected to return to England, a team could take a flyer on the mercurial talent and see if it pays off.

[ RELATED: Will Mourinho-Costa feud lead to transfer activity for Chelsea? ]

Emmanuel Adebayor (Unattached)

After being told he was not in Mauricio Pochettino‘s plans at Tottenham, Adebayor was happy to sit out and collect a paycheck, a pretty big paycheck that was reported to be upwards of $100,000 per week. He was eventually released from his contract in September, and many suspected the 31-year-old’s career was over. However, his name has begun to pop up in some transfer rumors for a possible return. The main question has to do with his attitude, and if he really wants to play anymore. If Adebayor were to return to the PL, he would get far less than his wages at Spurs, and could be a low-risk, high-reward option.

Away fans banned from French league games until mid-December

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France has placed a temporary ban on traveling supporters for upcoming league games due to security concerns in the wake of the Paris attacks.

Play resumed last weekend in Ligue 1 and Ligue 2 without away fans, and the French League (LFP) announced that ban would extend until at least mid-December.

[ MORE: Europa League roundup ]

A statement from the LFP said the ban was “because of a lack of availability of security forces during the state of emergency” as security has been tightened throughout the country. Paris is also hosting a United Nations summit from November 30-December 11.

Not only will league games be affected, but also European competition, as PSG is set to host Shakhtar Donetsk in the Champions League on December 8.

Paris Saint-Germain currently sits atop the Ligue 1 table, the only team remaining without a loss. Just 14 matches into the season, PSG already has a 13-point lead over second place Lyon.