Toronto FC v Vancouver Whitecaps

Daigo Kobayashi has a new home, traded from Vancouver to New England


This time last year, fans around the Whitecaps were touting the potential impact of their technically gifted Japanese important, Daigo Kobayashi. Today, Kobayashi’s Vancouver adventure ended, with New England giving up a fourth round draft pick to acquire the 31-year-old.

Kobayashi was already training with the Revolution, so the final destination isn’t much of a surprise, but given the hopes attached to the midfielder after his winter 2013 arrival, the move’s worth some reflection. Though it’s always difficult to tell how players will adapt to Major League Soccer, some projected Kobayashi’s skill to translate into one of the league’s better creative presences. Throughout the 2013 season, however, Kobayashi never validated those hopes, scoring twice and registering four assists during 30 appearances (21 starts).

“Daigo is a good person and player but we just didn’t see a spot for him on the team moving forward,” Carl Robinson, the teams new head coach, said in a club statement sent out by the team. “We wish him the best of luck in New England.”

With former Toronto midfielder Matias Laba landing in Vancouver, spots in the Whitecaps midfield become precious. Nigel Reo-Coker seems destined to start in the pivot, with the young Argentine likely to partner him in front of the defense. Kenny Miller and Russell Teibert give Robinson two players capable of starting above that pair, with Gershon Koffie another player worthy of minutes (and this is before we even get to the pure depth guys).

So there was no room in Vancouver, but if you’re inclined to see Kobayashi as a starter-level talent, the fit in New England is a curious one. But given the importance Lee Nguyen and Kelyn Rowe have in Jay Heaps’ set up, the acquisition  makes sense in terms of depth. Both Nguyen and Rowe are skill first, middle-of-the-park creators. With Kobayashi’s acquisition, New England has insurance should either go down, not to mention somebody who came fill in wide in New England the 4-1-4-1 formation Heaps used last season.

“Daigo is a technically gifted player who fits into our system well,” Michael Burns, New England’s general manager, said as his team announced the deal. “He assimilated well with our club when he was in Tucson with us, and we are looking forward to his return to the club soon.”

With all the comings and going of talents being imported into Major League Soccer, it’s always interesting to see how quickly reputations are made and revised. With home fans having developing the earliest investment in new players, it makes sense that so many arrivals see hopes transcend realistic expectations.

On a talented Vancouver team, that’s what happened with Kobayashi – a player how hasn’t been a prolific attacking force since his time in Norway in 2009. With Martin Rennie no longer on the sidelines for the Whitecaps, Kobayashi was always destined to land someplace new.

Jurgen Klopp announced as new Liverpool manager

Jurgen Klopp, Liverpool FC
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Enough with the speculation and reports already, because it’s finally officially official: Jurgen Klopp has been appointed the newest manager of Liverpool Football Club, the Merseyside club announced on Thursday.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s PL coverage ]

Klopp will be unveiled to the world at an introductory press conference at Anfield on Friday.

According to early reports, Klopp’s three-year contract could pay him as much as $10 million per season.

[ QUOTE KING: Top 10 “Klopp-isms” from his time at Dortmund ]

The 48-year-old German has been out of work since stepping down at Bundesliga side Borussia Dortmund following a seventh-place finish to the 2014-15 season. Klopp’s seven seasons in charge of Dortmund weren’t without success and silverware, though, as he led Der BVB to back-to-back league titles in 2011 and 2012, a German Cup triumph in 2012 and a UEFA Champions League final appearance in 2013.

PST’s Joe Prince-Wright will be at Anfield on Friday for Klopp’s unveiling, so be sure to follow JPW on Twitter and check back to PST for wall-to-wall coverage of Klopp’s first press conference as Liverpool manager.

Mourinho “working like never before” to turn Chelsea around

Jose Mourinho, Chelsea FC
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Jose Mourinho got the dreaded much-needed vote of confidence from Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich last weekend, seemingly giving the Portuguese manager a temporary stay of execution despite the Blues’ worst start to a season in 37 years.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s PL coverage ]

Speaking this week, Mourinho has revealed that while he’s thankful to have been kept on at the club for which he regularly professes his love, he still thinks it was no-brainer for Abramovich. In other words, Mourinho’s not backing down from his incredible, seven-minute rant to one question following Saturday’s defeat to Southampton.

Mourinho, on what he’s doing to turn Chelsea around — quotes from the Guardian:

“It shows the confidence of Abramovich in the manager who has won three Premier League titles with this club. I thank him and I keep working.

“What’s going on? I do not know. The results with Chelsea at the moment have been really bad. I cannot hide that reality, and I don’t want to. And I struggle to find an explanation. But I assure you: I’m working like never before and we will come out of this. And there is also the Champions League that we will not neglect, for certain.”

What did you expect from Mourinho? Well, you know, I should probably be fired, but thanks to Mr. Abramovich for not realizing this and keeping me employed? It’s simultaneously interesting and the least surprising thing ever, though, that Mourinho claims to not know what’s wrong with Chelsea at the moment. Of course he has a theory (or five), and of course he’s “working like never before” to correct it.

[ MORE: Ozil, Coquelin say Arsenal can win the title this season ]

The most fascinating thing about Chelsea’s sluggish start to the season is to see, hear and read Mourinho speaking from a position of powerlessness. Always the clever one, the one dictating where the discussion goes, the one in charge of every press interaction, Saturday’s rant felt like watching a desperate Mourinho grasping for anything by which to pull himself back up.