Ukraine vs. United States: Grading the players who needed to impress


On Tuesday night, we went through the list of U.S. Men’s National Team players who needed to impress against Ukraine in order to improve their World Cup stocks. They weren’t Clint Dempsey or Jozy Alitdore types – slumping players who, despite their club troubles, are destined to be with the team when it lands in Brazil. They were players who could have used Wednesday’s game to make their case to Jurgen Klinsmann, whether that case is to be on the 30-man provisional roster U.S. Soccer will name mid-May or the 23-man final team that will dress when the U.S. kicks off its Brazil 2014 against Ghana.

During a 2-0 loss in Larnaca, Cyprus, most of those World Cup aspirants failed to improve their positions. In some cases, players may have opened  doors for others to claim their spots, be those places on the list for May’s camp or seats on the charter that will take off for Brazil.

We highlighted eight cases yesterday. Here’s how they graded out. Obviously, we’re not grading on a curve:


John Brooks – The 21-year-old Hertha Berlin defender likely has a long international career ahead of him, and in that sense, Wednesday may be eventually been seen as a low point. Whereas Brooks had a chance to play himself into a spot in Brazil (particularly with players like Geoff Cameron and, potentially, Michael Parkhurst able to backup Omar Gonzalez, Matt Besler, and Clarence Goodson), his performance against Ukraine made it hard to justify the spot. He was badly, inexplicably out of position on the game’s opening goal. Grade: D.

Edgar Castillo – Castillo regularly draw negative reviews form onlookers for his performance in defense, but that’s part of Castillo’s game. The determining factor is whether he balances those deficiencies with influence going forward. On Wednesday, that influence was rarely seen, part of the reason why he was among the second  half’s first subs. Grade: D+.

(MORE: Ukraine 2-0 USA: Disjointed U.S. display sees fired up Ukraine prevail)

source: Getty ImagesMidfielders

Alejandro Bedoya – With the U.S. rarely able to get anything going in attack (particularly in the first half), Bedoya and Fabian Johnson were  forgotten men, with their team unable to get enough of a hold on the midfield to make use of its wingers. Bedoya, who was a favorite to be in the final 23-man squad before Wednesday’s match, didn’t hurt his stock. Given the nature of the game, though, he also wasn’t given many chances to improve it. Grade: C+.

Sacha Kljestan – The Anderlecht midfielder was the main culprit in the team’s midfield problems. We discussed it in an earlier post, but you can’t have a player give the ball, go, and never get back in position to receive a pass (especially in a two-man midfield). In the second half, Kljestan was pulled off, with Clint Dempsey pulled back into the space he was forced to occupy anyway. Grade: D.

Brek Shea – Shea got limited minutes off the bench – a spell that determines how he should be judged. What you’re really looking for in that role is somebody who can come off the bench, provide a different (in Shea’s case, more direct) look, and give you another option to threaten the defense. Shea’s execution came up short on Wednesday, but we saw what he’s capable of doing. He may be another look in May. Grade: C+.

Danny Williams – That he only got 10 minutes speaks to the impression he made in camp, but once he came on in Cyprus, Williams provided a spark. At one point, the Reading man surged toward the penalty area in a way you couldn’t imagine from Wednesday’s Jermaine Jones. While that moment is unlikely to overshadow what Jurgen Klinsmann saw throughout the camp, it was enough to remind viewers of the player that used to be a regular call up. Grade: C.

(MORE: Ukraine vs. United States: Looking back on our five focal points)


Juan Agudelo – Like Williams, the lack of time was telling. The new Utrecht (by way of Stoke) attacker only received a few minutes at the end of the match, hinting he hadn’t made enough progress in training to justify significant minutes. With Chris Wondolowski and Mike Magee impressing  in January camp, Agudelo’s chances of making the World Cup squad seem thin, at this time. Grade: C.

Terrence Boyd – Dressed, but did not play. His grade may be incomplete (because he didn’t hurt himself during the game), but having failed to win playing time this week, Boyd now looks a longer shot to be on the plane to Brazil. Grade: Inc.


Geoff Cameron – Cameron’s spot on our list wasn’t about making the World Cup squad (he’s definitely going to Brazil). It was about winning the job at right back. On Wednesday, he treaded water. The defense was so bad that you don’t want to judge Cameron too harshly, but on a couple of occasions, he was a part of the chaos. Brad Evans should feel slightly better about his chances of starting game one in Brazil. Grade: C.

Klopp’s Liverpool squad enthusiasm: “Everything is there”

LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 09:  Jurgen Klopp is unveiled as the new manager of Liverpool FC during a press conference at Anfield on October 9, 2015 in Liverpool, England.  (Photo by Alex Livesey/Getty Images)
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It isn’t Dortmund, but that’s a good thing for Liverpool.

Our own Joe Prince-Wright was on the scene for Jurgen Klopp’s unveiling as the latest Reds manager, and the 48-year-old German had a lot to say.

Perhaps most poignant for Liverpool fans are Klopp’s words on the talent he inherits from Brendan Rodgers. Sure there are quips that will hit the headlines, but how about Klopp’s assertion that success shouldn’t take nearly as long as his dramatic work at BVB.

From JPW on Merseyside:

“We did in Dortmund what we had to do, to improve the players, to work for a common idea of play. That is what we did and its the same thing we want to do here. They are not the same players of course,” Klopp told NBC Sports ProSoccerTalk. “These players from Liverpool are better, more experienced in some ways and younger in other cases. Everything is okay, I am here. I am not here only because LFC was calling. I believe in the potential of this team. Four or five strikers you can work with when they are not injured, midfielders is really good, defenders experienced and very young, goalkeeper is really good. Everything is there.”

Everything. A powerful word and one that doesn’t get lost in translation. Liverpool has a batch of world class talent, and Klopp’s is anxious to organize it in world class fashion. Strap in, Anfield.

CONCACAF Cup preview: Ultimate guide to USMNT vs Mexico

Beasley, and other US veterans, have been asked to take the young guys under their wing.
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So here we go: the biggest rivalry in U.S. Soccer, the one that sends fans racing for the stadia for a glimpse of history.

It’s the U.S. and Mexico for the right to go to the 2017 Confederations Cup in Russia, and it will play out at the Rose Bowl on Saturday night.

National pride is on the line, and national jobs may rightly be in jeopardy. Let’s swing through our coverage, and what’s at stake in just over 24 hours time.

The Battles

Who is the key to Saturday’s match? Is it Michael Bradley? Fabian Johnson? Andres Guardado? Will Klinsmann opt for players with Liga MX experience, stay Euro Heavy, or appease the domestic set? Read more here.

The XI

So how will Klinsmann line ’em up? JPW has his preference, some options, and a prediction of what the manager will do.

The history

What are the chances this one finds its way into the upper echelon of matches in the Mexico/U.S. rivalry? This is the company it could join.

Klinsmann’s future

The folks in the anti-Klinsmann brigade seethe with pure detestation of the USMNT boss. Any quote from him is self-serving and dishonest, any success accidental. Beat Germany or the Netherlands in friendlies on the road? Coincidental and Unimportant. Lose a friendly to Brazil? The worst thing ever.

[ MORE: The case for firing Klinsmann after a loss ]

So this match, being meaningful and testing his unbeaten mark vs Mexico, is going to be a clarion call for U.S. Soccer fans. Barring a cataclysmic loss in horrific blowout fashion, he won’t be canned. But a win will be validation for his supporters while a loss would cue a genuine hot seat. And for his detractors, already foaming at the mouth from the words of icon Landon Donovan? Kablammo.